Branscombe Timelines C17

BRANSCOMBE TIMELINES

The Seventeenth Century

The header for each year is preceded with an @ sign to facilitate searching


@1600
11 July, St. Clement's Townstall, Dartmouth: Acot, child of Richard Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [cf: 1598 St. Clement's, Richard Branscombe m. Christa Hert & 1598/9 St. Clement's, poss first child James?]

`The period 1400-1600 was one of very rapid development both in ship-building and in armament, but information is fragmentary, and the period as a whole has been termed a `gap' in nautical knowledge.'

The decade 1600-1610 was a `little ice-age' over most of the northern hemisphere. (cf: 1608)

The East India Company founded:

` ... after the first flush of enthusiasm had died down, it met with increasing difficulty in raising funds to continue the trade ... even when setting out on its first expedition (1601) many of the subscribers failed to fulfill their engagements.'

Approximate year Bradbury House (White House) Hare Street is built.

The period 1600-1715 was the flowering of the south-west wool-weaving trade, centred on Exeter. The serges were renowned as hard-wearing. Barnstaple and Bideford were the main receiving ports for Irish wool. Crediton and Morchard Bishop were local weaving centres.

@1601
Statute of Poor Law. (in force to the middle of the 19th. century) `... distinguishing as it did between `willful' and `impotent' poor, and placing the burden of relief firmly on the local community, it all too often meant, in practice, that the labourer `became virtually imprisoned in his parish.''

24 July: George Waymouth writes to the East India Company, proposing an expedition to discover the north-west passage.

` ... early in 1601, a serious blow was dealt to the infant company by the loss of its Governor, Alderman and Sheriff Smythe, who had taken a leading part in its foundation, and had guided its operations with energy and skill. This unfortunate episode was the outcome of the rebellion of the Earl of Essex, and took place while the company's first fleet, under Captain Lancaster, was still in the Thames awaiting a fair wind for its departure. The fact that the earl, in attempting to rouse the citizens of London against the government, made in the first instance for Smythe's house, excited a suspicion that the sheriff was one of his partisans, and Smythe was arrested and imprisoned in the Tower. With some difficulty, he established his innocence, and after a time he was released; but he remained under a cloud and found it advisable to abstain from taking part in any public affairs until after the death of the Queen ... At the time of departure of Lancaster's fleet the East India Company was in debt to the extent of £9000, and its creditors were clamouring for payment.

September: The East India Company agrees to underwrite another expedition.

`Another hindrance was that the company had allowed itself to be drawn into a scheme for despatching two pinnaces under George Waymouth [Weymouth], to discover a passage to the Indies by the north-west, and members were being pressed to find money for this venture.'

Branscombe: Gilbert Holcombe of Hole, married to Anne Courtney, sells Hole House to Ellis Bartlett, after 500 years of occupation by the Hole family.

Crediton: Eliz Brownscombe marries Bart Luckcome.

@1602
16 April, Stoke Damerel: Eliza Branscombe marries William Fitzgerald.(IGI)

2 May: John (Thomas?) Branscombe and the expedition of Captain George Waymouth leaves Ratcliffe, to find a north-west passage to the Orient, for the East India Company. [Ratcliff Cross, at Ratcliff, on the Thames east of London: `the point from which Tudor and Elizabethan seafarers departed to the unknown. Today a stone in Shadwell Park commemorates their names.']

`He left with the Discovery, 70 tons, George Waymouth as captain, William Cobreth, master; and the Godspeed, 60 tons, John Drew, master, with an experienced Muscovy Company agent, the Reverend John Cartwright, as his mentor. There were provisions for his 34 men for eighteen months. He carried in a tin box a fine illuminated letter from Queen Elizabeth to the Emperor of China, with Latin, Italian and Spanish translations, (currently preserved, in their box, in the Lancashire County Records Office, Preston.) showing that the government regarded the mission as being a serious one. At sea, Waymouth showed himself to be a very competent navigator. He managed, for example, to determine his latitude under unfavourable weather conditions, which was a tribute to his experience as well as his skill. He usefully examined the Labrador coast, and left some valuable original observations on it; in particular he showed that Hamilton Inlet penetrated well into the interior, but was not itself a channel through the mainland. He met uniformly poor weather, though he appears to have located the entry into Hudson Strait around Cape Chidley and, like other venturers into this area before and after, he was met with stout resistance to going any farther from his crew, who eventually forced him, ignominiously, to turn back.

His control over his men was not very effective, and he showed little of that dogged tenacity and fanaticism which had distinguished the pioneer voyages of John Davis, and was soon to bring Hudson to his death, in his Northwest Passage search. The decision to return, however, was laid firmly on Cartwright's shoulders.

Waymouth set himself to complete a manual which he may well have begun some years before, The Jewell of Artes, which he proposed to present to King James in the hope of being supported by him in a further attempt to discover the Northwest Passage. This he did, first in a preliminary version, and then in 1604. Both are in royal bindings of the period, though both somehow passed out of royal custody.'

The muster-roll of officers and crew, numbering 33, for the 1602 Waymouth expedition includes a reference to a Thomas Brownscombe, of Bankfull, Devon, but no John. Thomas is paid 30s.

`Waymouth [Weymouth]'s expedition ... succeeded in penetrating for a considerable distance into what is now known as Hudson's Strait. Emerging from this, the vessels were driven south by contrary winds; the men grew mutinous; and Waymouth decided to return. By September, he was back in English waters. For a while, the idea was entertained of sending him to continue the search; but in January 1603, it was resolved that the pinnaces should be sold and the attempt "utterlie be left of." '

Formation of the Dutch East India Company

`Hudson Strait had been vainly reconnoitered by George Waymouth, in 1602. At the entrance of "Lumley's Inlet", in fog and snow, he discerned that `a great current setteth to the west, the greatest hope of a passage this way', with `no ground in 120 fathom'. Beating north, and then south to clear the ice, and with `his roapes and sailes all frozen', his men mutinied and, after watering from an iceberg which cracked like thunder and `brake in sunder to the great danger of his boates', he returned.

Thirty years later his voyage was appraised by Captain Luke Foxe:

` ... hee neither discovered nor named any thing more then Davis, nor had any sight of Groenland, nor was not so farre north ... yet these two, Davis and he, did (I conceive) light Hudson into his Straightes'.

In Amsterdam Henry Hudson, in 1609, read Waymouth's logbooks, which had come into Dutch hands, and received letters and maps from Captain John Smith, in Virginia, indicating `a short route for sailing to the Indies', by a voyage `around their southern colony on the north'. In the following year Hudson found support in London for this venture, and he sailed in Waymouth's old ship the Discovery, which was to make in all six arctic voyages.'

23 July, Exmouth: Return of the exploratory voyage of cousins Captain Bartholomew Gosnold and Captain Bartholomew Gilbert (not the son of Sir Humphrey), `and divers other gentlemen', from the New England Coast. They had sailed from Falmouth on the 20 March, 1602, with 32 people, aboard the Concord. One was John Brereton, who wrote an account of the voyage, Briefe and true relation of the discoverie of the north part of Virginia. Another of the explorers, Archer, wrote a diary, in which he notes the naming of Cape Cod. `Finally they landed on Cuttyhunk, which they called Elizabeth's Isle, the name now given to the whole group of islands. There they found a little island in the midst of a freshwater lake, which they fortified, and made their home.' Brereton's description of this small refuge, and of the mainland near it, is so lyrical that it has given rise to the speculation that Shakespeare, friend of the Earl of Southampton, one of the patrons of the voyage, might have had it in mind when he created Prospero's magic isle in The Tempest'.

The two ships, Godspeed and Discovery, return to Dartmouth on 5 August, unsuccessful, and John Branksom is paid off (29 November). George Waymouth's journal, including a description of the mutiny, is transmitted to The Company in London, and read at an East India Company Court of the Committees held on 16 September.

25 September, St. Mary Major, Exeter: Laurence Branscombe, son of James, is baptised. (IGI)

Construction of Hatfield House completed, using bricks scavenged from the palace of 1497.

@1603
28 January, Littleham: Ellys Branscombe of Littleham marries Jone Wheaton. [poss 7 children: Wilmot (bp. 1607, poss m. 1638 Simon Hooper?), William (bp. 1609, poss d. 1630?), Jone (bp. 1612), Dyna (1614-1615), Elizabeth (bp. 1616, poss m. 1656 Thomas Langford?), Elias (bp. 1619), Thomas (bp. 1622, poss m. 1646 Susanna Elson, poss d. 1660?). The Littleham registers before this date have been lost]

January: It is resolved by the East India Company that the pinnaces Discovery and Godspeed, employed by George Waymouth in his abortive voyage to discover a north-west passage (1602) should be sold and the attempt "utterlie be left of".

24 March: Reign of Queen Elizabeth I ends (since 1558), the last of the Tudor Dynasty (1485-1603). James I (VI of Scotland) succeeds to the throne (to 1625), the first of the Stuart Dynasty (1603-1714).

15 July: Sir Walter Raleigh, formerly a favourite of Elizabeth, is arrested for treason, and locked in the Tower of London with his family and servants for twelve years (to 1616)

Bristol merchants invest in a voyage of discovery to `the north part of Virginia' (New England), principally to bring back a cargo of Sassafras, which was regarded as the best cure for the "French Pox" - venereal disease. The voyage is commanded by Martin Pring, a young captain of 23. His fleet consisted of the Speedwell, and the Discoverer.

Beginning of Tokugawa shogunate, in Japan. (to mid-19th.century?)

Sir William Pole, antiquary, is Sheriff of Devon.

Charles Blount created Earl of Devon by patent. The title has been dormant since 1556. [title extinguished again when Blount dies, in 1606]

Crediton: Thos Brownscombe marries Agn Wotton.

@1604
29 January, Crediton: Philip Brenscombe marries Sibill Buchal.

George Waymouth presents his The Jewell of Artes to King James, in the hope of being supported by him in a further attempt to discover the Northwest Passage. (cf: 1602)

` ... a fine piece of work, well-written, comprehensive, and illustrated with a remarkable series of drawings and volvelles'. The largest section covers navigation instruments, a further one shipbuilding (his own family trade), and another Engines (miscellaneous devices). [also first designs for `model towns' in North America]

OED says the word profit is used for the first time in a written document, but only in Aberdeen!

Walter Yonge commences his diary while resident in Colyton. (to 1628)

7 October, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: William, son of William Braunscombe, is christened. (IGI) [there is no record, so far, of William senior's marriage. A William of this parish makes his will in 1635. Poss siblings: Thomas (1607), Elizabeth (1609), Joan (1612)]

@1605
Captain George Waymouth explores parts of `New England' in the Archangel. He is engaged by Plymouth merchants and Sir Thomas Arundell. He returns with five Eastern Abenaki Indians. Also on board, James Rosier, who writes True Relation, The first account of the exploration and attempted settlement of Maine.

`In 1605 there sailed into Plymouth Sound a little craft under Captain George Weymouth [Waymouth]. He had returned from the discovery of the St. George's River and the Penobscot (Maine) and brought with him five Indians. Never before, surely, had such strange passengers gazed with such wondering eyes upon the shapes of the Hoe and the slate roofs of the little town by the Pool. He gave three of these visitors to Sir Ferdinando Gorges, Governor of the Hoe Fort, who taught them to speak English. While Marinda, Shetwarroes and Tisquantun discoursed to him of the wonders and resources of their native land, his active mind was revolving plans for further colonisation and settlement.'

The remaining two Indians were delivered to London. One of these, Tahanedo, was returned to his home by the Popham colony, in 1606.

Original registers of baptisms, marriages and deaths in Dawlish exist from 1627-1975. An index of marriages exists, covering 1605-1837. There are also non-conformist records of the years 1814-37.

25 March, Clyst St. George: Elisabeth Branscombe buried. `vicesimo quinto die martij supulta est Elisabetha Branscombe'

31 October: Guy Fawkes arrested, Westminster Palace. `Fawkes hid in the cellar with a huge amount of cordite and timber hidden in barrels. He hoped, he said later, to blow James I and the Scots back to Scotland. His brothers-in-arms would then kidnap the king's eldest daughter, Lady Elizabeth, and put her on the English throne as a puppet ruler. Fawkes was not burnt, as bonfire night suggests. Instead, he suffered ten days of torture on the rack before being hung, drawn and quartered, opposite the old palace in Westminster. Weak and ill, he had to be helped up the ladder to his execution on the scaffold, where he asked forgiveness from the king. Later his head, and those of three others, were stuck on spikes on London Bridge, as a warning to other rebellious Catholics.

It was also about this time that William Shakespeare finished writing King Lear.'

@1606
20 December, Ratcliffe: First Virginia colonists depart, aboard the Susan Constant, the Godspeed, and the Discovery. [the last two probably Waymouth's vessels from 1602, and Weldon's, 1604-1606]

`There was no fanfare. There was apparently not even any announcement-in fact, only two of the colonists have left mention of the date. Yet that sailing laid the foundation for the British Empire.'

John Brounsecoumbe of Whitstone makes his will. [a John is assessed in the 1524, 1544 & 1581 subsidies for Whitestone, about four miles west of Exeter. In 1609, John Branscombe marries Thomasine Parry in Whitestone]

The Earldom of Devon extinguished on the death of Charles Blount, created Earl by patent in 1603. [title recreated in 1618]

Exeter, St. David's: Rbt Bronnscome marries Eliz Willins.

@1607
12 April, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Thomas, son of William Branscombe, is christened. (IGI) [there is no record, so far, of William senior's marriage. A William of this parish makes his will in 1635. Poss siblings: William (1604), Elizabeth (1609), Joan (1612)]

15 April, Littleham: Wilmot, first child of Elias Branscombe & Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham), is baptised. [poss m. 1638 Simon Hooper? Poss siblings: William (bp. 1609, poss d. 1630?), Jone (bp. 1612), Dyna (1614-1615), Elizabeth (bp. 1616, poss m. 1656 Thomas Langford?), Elias (bp. 1619), Thomas (bp. 1622, poss m. 1646 Susanna Elson, poss d. 1660?)]

27 October: Captain George Waymouth is granted a pension of 3s.4d per diem, `until such time as he shall
receive from His Majesty some other advancement.'
[There is some evidence this is "hush money" to stop him talking to the Spanish about his discoveries]

Raleigh Gilbert founds the first Plymouth settlement in Virginia. It was abandoned after one year, and Raleigh returned to Devon, to inherit Compton Castle.

Jamestown, Virginia. The first permanent English settlement.

Will of John Brounston of Morchard Episcopi (Morchard Bishop), proved in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.

@1608
14 November, Sandford: Elizabeth, wife of Robert Brownscombe, buried.

Plymouth settlement in Virginia revived. (cf: 1607)

French settle in Quebec.

Mini ice-age in Northern Europe: the Thames freezes over.

The will of Thomas Brounsdon of Shipstor is administered.

@1609
4 January, Feniton: Dorothye Brannscombe marries Josias Skinner. (IGI) [daughter of weaver Osmond Branscombe & Joan. Siblings: Peter, Grace, Thomas, George, Joane? Josias may be related to George Skinner, rector of Feniton in 1614, when Osmund's will is proved. According to that will, Dorothy & Josias have at least one child, Elizabeth]

18 January, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Elsabeth, daughter of William Branscum, christened. (IGI) [there is no record, so far, of William senior's marriage. A William of this parish makes his will in 1635. Poss siblings William (1604), Thomas (1607), Joan (1612)]

24 April, Whitestone: John Brownscombe & Thomasine Parry marry. [a John Branscombe is assessed in the 1524, 1544 & 1581 subsidies for Whitestone, about four miles west of Exeter. In 1606, John Branscombe of Whitestone makes his will. This John & Thomasine appear in the records for Whitestone & Aishbury for the next fifty years. They may have the following children: Thomas (1612), Agnes (1616?), Susanna (1619), William (1620-1620?), Alice (1621). A John makes his will in 1622, although John & Thomasine are still around in 1660, to pay the poll tax. Thomasine makes her will in 1641. She is assessed separately for property in Aishbury, in the 1642 assessment]

17 October, Littleham: Jane Branscombe buried. [poss mother of Ellis Branscombe, m. 1603 Littleham, Joan Wheaton?]

23 November, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Oliver Brenscombe, son of Avice, is baptised. (IGI)

10 December, Littleham: William, second child of Ellis Branscombe & Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham), is baptised. [poss d. 1630 Littleham, unmarried? Poss siblings: Wilmot (bp. 1607, poss m. 1638 Simon Hooper?), Jone (bp. 1612), Dyna (1614-1615), Elizabeth (bp. 1616, poss m. 1656 Thomas Langford?), Elias (bp. 1619), Thomas (bp. 1622, poss m. 1646 Susanna Elson, poss d. 1660?)]

Nicholas Wadham, last male heir of the family of Edge Barton and Merifield, dies. His widow Dorothy [daughter of Sir William Petre], aged 75, `carried out his wishes with such vigour and promptitude that in spite of the obstructive tactics of a co-trustee, the new college [Wadham College, Oxford] was built and occupied before she died, nine years later.' [Wyndham says Somerset masons helped build it]

John Brownscombe of Exeter makes his will.

Second Virginia Company formed.

The telescope is invented, in Holland.

@1610
17 September: Osmond Brownscombe of Feniton, weaver, makes his will. [proved 3 June, 1614]

Thomas Cross carves his name into the window surround at Edge. He may have been a servant of Dorothy Wadham?

The Prince of Wales' feathers are carved next to his name.

@1611
King James version of the Bible published.

Sir Thomas Gates, Governor of Virginia, 1611-1614. (Born in Colyford)

The eminent London merchant, Sir James Bond, commissions George Waymouth, Gentleman, to build and equip a ship for him. He is to get together timber, and all necessities to construct a vessel of forty tons, to make a voyage of twenty men for one year. He lived long enough to build at least one more ship, and to earn the envy and hatred of a more famous shipbuilder, Phineas Pett, who maintained he was finally disgraced for his inadequacies.

John Speed's famous atlas, The Theatre of the Empire of Great Britain, is published. It contained county maps, and remained in print until 1770. The map of Wiltshire shows Shaw, North Lydiard, Lydiard Bagpuize, Purton, Rodbourne, Eastcott and Swindon.

30 September, Charleton, Devon: William, son of Geo. & Joane Brownescom baptised. [this is the only entry for Branscombe in this parish, baptisms 1560-1719, burials 1561-1812, marriages 1562-1720]

@1612
12 April, Whitestone: Thomas Brownscombe, son of John, is baptised. [poss child of John & Thomasine (Parry - m. 1609 Whitestone? poss siblings: Agnes (1616?), Susanna (1619), William (1620-1620?), Alice (1621)]

26 May, Littleham: Jone, daughter of Ellis Branscome, is baptised. [poss third child of Ellis Branscombe & Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham). poss siblings: Wilmot (bp. 1607, poss m. 1638 Simon Hooper?), William (bp. 1609, poss d. 1630?), Dyna (1614-1615), Elizabeth (bp. 1616, poss m. 1656 Thomas Langford?), Elias (bp. 1619), Thomas (bp. 1622, poss m. 1646 Susanna Elson, poss d. 1660?)]

3 August, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Nicholas, son of Richard Brenscomb, is baptised. (IGI) [Richard a mariner? cf: 1619 Survey. This Nicholas poss father of Nicholas of Dawlish? see 1641 Protestation. cf: 1614 for poss bp. of brother Martin, 1615 for poss sister Margaret & 1623 for poss brother Henry]

27 September, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Joan, daughter of William Branscum, christened. (IGI) [there is no record, so far, of William senior's marriage. A William of this parish makes his will in 1635. Poss siblings William (1604), Thomas (1607), Elizabeth (1609)]

25 October, Allhallows London Wall: Eliz Branscom, marries Robert Slater. (IGI)

Nicholas Wadham founds Wadham College, Oxford. [posthumously]

Resolution, Captain Thomas Button, and Discovery, Captain John Ingram, set sail in April, to discover the north-west passage for the East India Company. (cf: 1602)

The will of Mark Brownscombe, of Upton Hellions, is administered in the ?court? [Crediton. cf: 1619 - duplication?]

@1613
?Dawlish: (Alice/Aline?) Braunscomb, & (Vobhr? Gregory?) marry.

?May, Sandford: Edward Brownscombe buried.

The will of Edward Brownscombe of Sandford is proved in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter,

Bovey Tracey: Al Brannscoumbe marries Rbt Gregory.

@1614
27 March, Mamhead: Agnes, daughter of John Brownscombe, baptised. [poss siblings: John (bur. 1615), Margery (bp. 1616)]


3 June, Feniton: Will of Osmond Brownscombe, weaver of Feniton, proved, in the Archdeaconry Court of Exeter.

`To be buried in the churchyard of Fenyton

To Petter Brounscombe, my son, 33s 4d or my featherbed, and other goods including my best brasse pann which I had before I maryed my wife that now is, and 3 tin platter dishes marked with a broad axe

To my daughter Grace now the wife of William Saunders, household goods
To Dorothy, my daughter now the wife of Josias Skynner, household goods.
To my son Thomas Brownscomb 33s 4d
To my son George Brownscombe, goods
To George Brounscombe, the younger, goods.
To my daughters children, William, Thomas and Elizabeth Saunders, 3s 4d each
To my son Thomas his children 10s
To Joane Gould, Katherine and Chrisabel Gould my daughters children 12d each
To Elizabeth Skynner, my daughter's child 3s 4d
To the poor of Fenyton 3s 4d

Residue to my wife Joane, executrix

Overseers: John Ware & William Saunders

Witnesses: George Skinner, rector of Finiton, Jacobus Saunder, John Weare, William Gould, George Brownscombe, William Saunder

Inventory: £17.10.4d


4 September, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Martin, son of Richard Brenscom, baptised. (IGI) [poss brother of Nicholas, bp. 1612, sister Margaret, bp. 1615 & brother Henry bp. 1623? Richard may be a mariner - see 1619 Survey]

Branscombe family deeds for Drupe, Colaton Raleigh, 1614-1739.
(EPNI)

`Drupe Farm (now transformed into holiday cottages) was, in 1330, the home of William atte Thrope. In 1388 it was called Thorp and became Droope in 1679. The name is interesting in being the only example of the Old English Thorp (roughly, a dependent or outlying dairy farm belonging to a village or manor) which has been noted, in Devon.'

Approximate year of birth of Thomas Branscombe. (IGI)

26 December, Littleham: Dyna, poss fourth child of Ellis Branscombe & Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham), is baptised. [d. 1615? poss siblings: Wilmot (bp. 1607, poss m. 1638 Simon Hooper?), William (bp. 1609, poss d. 1630?), Jone (bp. 1612), Elizabeth (bp. 1616, poss m. 1656 Thomas Langford?), Elias (bp. 1619), Thomas (bp. 1622, poss m. 1646 Susanna Elson, poss d. 1660?)]

@1615
13 March, Mamhead: John, son of John Brownscombe, buried. [poss siblings: Agnes (bp. 1614), Margery (bp. 1616)]

12 May: Marriage License granted to Thomas Pooke of Silferton and Emeline Brownscombe of Tiverton. [cf: 1619 land transaction. Emeline may be the daughter of William Branscombe of Tiverton?]

26 August: William Branscombe of Plymouth paid for two days' work, at 10p per day, as a "server" on the construction of the Hospital of Orphans Aid. [first of a series of payments to October 7. Servers are listed alongside masons, so may have been the early term for a "bricky's labourer"!]

28 September, Littleham: Dyna Branscomb buried. [poss fourth child of Elias Branscombe & Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham)? poss siblings: Wilmot (bp. 1607, poss m. 1638 Simon Hooper?), William (bp. 1609, poss d. 1630?), Jone (bp. 1612), Elizabeth (bp. 1616, poss m. 1656 Thomas Langford?), Elias (bp. 1619), Thomas (bp. 1622, poss m. 1646 Susanna Elson, poss d. 1660?)]

?December, Sandford: Charity Brownscombe, widow, buried.

The will of Charitie Brownscombe of Sandford is proved in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.

24 December, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Margaret, daughter of Richard Brenscom, is baptised. (IGI) [poss sister of Martin (1614), Nicholas (1612), Henry (1623)? Richard may be a mariner - see 1619 Survey]

Raphe Hamor, True Discourse. An early eye-witness account of the colonisation of America. Includes a description of the baptism and marriage of Pocahontas.

Bovey Tracey: Mgt Brownscombe marries John Beard.

@1616
17-20 February, County of Middlesex Sessions of Peace & Gaol Delivery, 1615/16:

`Nicholas Chester of St. Bride's, silkweaver, to give evidence against Edward Brownscomb, for stealing a carpet "of Aris work" and other things. The said Edward detained in gaol.'

11 August, Littleham: Elizabeth Branscomb baptised, poss fifth child of Ellys & Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham). [poss m. 1656 Thomas Langford? Poss siblings: Wilmot (bp. 1607, poss m. 1638 Simon Hooper?), William (bp. 1609, poss d. 1630?), Jone (bp. 1612), Dyna (1614-1615), Elias (bp. 1619), Thomas (bp. 1622, poss m. 1646 Susanna Elson, poss d. 1660?)]

26 August, Mamhead: Margery, daughter of John Brownscombe, baptised. [poss siblings: Agnes (bp. 1614), John (bur. 1615)]

New England named.

Sir Walter Raleigh released from twelve years' imprisonment in the Tower of London [cf: 1603]. He sets off for South America, to look for gold, but disobeys James I's order not to attack Spaniards [cf: 1618].

Dirk Hartog nails up his pewter plate in Western Australia.

@1617
6 October, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Henry Branscome marries Honor Turner. (IGI) [IGI notes `relative of John R Turner']

5 November, All Hallows, London Wall: John, son of Alexander & Margery Branscomb, baptised. [Alexander's first wife - buried 8 November cf: 1620 Effyn]

8 November, All Hallows, London Wall: Margaret, wife of Alexander Branscombe, buried.

The will of John Brownscombe of Crediton is proved, in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.

Exeter, St. Thomas: Wm Brownscum marries Agn Mortimore.

@1618
27 January: Marriage License granted to Edmund Braunscombe of Dawlish and Mary Kennard of Powderham.

27 January: Marriage License granted to Giles Ridgeman of Dawlish and Agnes Wichalse of Powderham.

16 May, Branscombe: Dame Dorothea Wadham dies, Edge Barton.

Carried from Eg the 18th May. Buried beside her husband, Sir Nicholas Wadham, (died: 1609) in the Wadham transept of Ilminster church. Sir Nicholas founded Wadham College, Oxford, although Dame Dorothy actually carried out his will in this regard, finishing the college construction in June 1614, and then ruling its' destiny until she died.

`She spent her widowhood at Edge, but was buried beside her husband in the Wadham chapel in Ilminster church. Nicholas had no male heir, and the estates passed to his sister Florence, whose husband, John Wyndham, had died in 1572. On her death a "fair inheritance" (according to the seventeenth-century historian, Tristram Risdon) "was divided among three worshipful families, Strangeways, Windham and Martin." Merifield became the sole property of Florence's son, Sir John Wyndham, who took a dislike to the house and razed it to the ground. The site is still known locally as Wadham's Castle, but no buildings survive. Edge also suffered, but less drastically, for it passed jointly to the families of Wyndham and Strangeways ... As far as is known the house was occupied by tenant farmers from 1618 until 1933.'

22 June: Elizabeth Brownscombe, (EPNI)

Sir Walter Raleigh is beheaded, on the order of James I, for disobeying instructions not to attack the Spanish, on a voyage to South America.

William Cavendish created Earl of Devonshire by patent. [true hereditary entitlement actually remained dormant in the seven dispossessed successive heirs of Edward Courtenay (1553), owners of Powderham Castle. Recovered by virtue of this evidence by William, Viscount Courtenay of Powderham, in 1831]

@1619
4 January & 22 July: Elizabeth Bronscombe, (EPNI)

10 March, Tiverton: Lease of a parcel of 10 acres at Howdon, and a quarter of Ashley Park to Thomas Pooke, husbandman of Silverton, from John Trelawney esquire of Trelawne, Cornwall, in reversion (?) of William Branscombe. (EPNI)

3 May, Whitestone: Susanna Brownscombe, daughter of John, is baptised. [poss child of John & Thomasine (Parry - m. 1609 Whitestone? poss siblings: Thomas (1612), Agnes (1616?), William (1620-1620?), Alice (1621)]

13 June, Littleham: Ellis Branscomb baptised. Possibly sixth child of Ellis & Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham)? [poss siblings: Wilmot (bp. 1607, poss m. 1638 Simon Hooper?), William (bp. 1609, poss d. 1630?), Jone (bp. 1612), Dyna (1614-1615), Elizabeth (bp. 1616, poss m. 1656 Thomas Langford?), Thomas (bp. 1622, poss m. 1646 Susanna Elson, poss d. 1660?)]

22 June, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: Pascowe, daughter of Roberte Brownscombe baptised. (EPNI) [buried, 1620]


THE DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM'S SURVEY OF MARINERS & SHIPS, 1619

`A book of all the shipping, with their ages, names, burthens & ordnance, as also of all mariners, sailors and fishermen, with their names, ages and places, etc.'

Plymouth mariners at home

George Waymouth 48

Plymouth sailors at home

Richard Bremcombe 40

[lives in St. Andrews parish? May be father of Nicholas (1612), Martin (1614), Margaret (1615), Henry (1623), & poss grandfather of Nicholas of Dawlish?]

Plymstock mariners at home

George Bronsombe 40

Dawlish masters/mariners

John Waymouth 42

Dawlish sailors

Thomas Branscomb 30
Edward Branscomb 41
Thomas Waymouth 20

Shipping of Dawlish

Marye, 20 tuns, Newfoundland
Mayeflower, 12 tuns, at home

St. Marychurch mariners & sailors:

Christopher Waymouth 25
Christopher Waymouth 30
Andrew Waymouth 22
Anthony Waymouth 20
Digory Waymouth 32
George Waymouth 18
Richard Waymouth 60
Richard Waymouth 35
Robert Waymouth 30
Robert Waymouth 30
William Waymouth 60
William Waymouth 35
William Waymouth 34
William Waymouth 28

Cockington mariners/sailors:

George Way 20

Dartmouth mariners/sailors from home:

John Waymouth 35

Branscombe sailors:

Francis Bartlett 23
Humphrey Sholdner 24

Sailor
a member of a ship's company below the rank of officer, who was professionally engaged in the sailing of the vessel.

Mariner
had two separate definitions. In one sense, it referred to any man employed on a ship ... but it also applied to the most senior class of seamen, sometimes indicating masters of ships who entered into voyages on their own account. Many of those described simply as sailors would have regularly served aboard the New England and Newfoundland fishing fleets.

Plymouth had a total of 278 seamen, in this survey Dartmouth 446.

What emerges most clearly is the great concentration of seamen in the area to the east of Dartmouth: not only just across the River Dart at Kingswear (93), and Brixham (153), but in such Torbay parishes as Paignton (100), and St. Marychurch (144). With 42% of the total, this was clearly the centre of south Devon's mariner population. Dawlish is another notable parish, with 133. The only places in east Devon with significant numbers of seamen were Sidmouth (103), and Beer & Seaton (80).

The survey shows that there was, in some cases at least, a great lack of imagination in the naming of ships: it was not uncommon to find several ships of the same name within the same port. For example, in 1619 there were three ships called the Hopewell, of Dartmouth, and in 1626, there were six ships called the John, in Dartmouth and Torbay. The Blessing, the Providence and the Prosperous were also particularly popular names.

Raleigh Gilbert of Greenway on the River Dart, is listed as being a ship owner.

In south Devon, ships were spread along the entire length of the coast, but the greatest number, not only in terms of the total number of ships, but also in tonnage, was located in and around Dartmouth (39%). Plymouth was second in rank in Devon.


DARTMOUTH CORPORATION SURVEY OF SHIPS, 1619:

Mr. Gourney & partners own the Anne, and the Silphine.

Mr. Thomas Gourneye owns the Christofer.


The founding of Batavia, the beginning of the Dutch colonial empire in the east Indies.

The will of Marcks (Mark?) Brownscombe of Upton Hellions, is proved in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter. [Crediton. cf: 1612, 1620 - duplications? Also cf: 1694 - Andrew Brownscombe of Upton Hellions]

Geo. Branscombe, butcher of Feniton, aged 38. [poss George, b. ABOUT 1571, son of weaver Osmund Branscombe & Joan, of Feniton, and mentioned in Osmond's will of 1614, where there is also mention of George the Younger, possibly this George's son? A George junior is issued with a marriage license on 25 January 1630/31. George senior may have the following siblings: Peter, Grace, Dorothy, Thomas, Joan?]

@1620
15 January, St. Edmund's, Exeter: John Bronscome buried. (EPNI)

23 March, Whitestone: William Brounscombe buried. [poss child of John & Thomasine (Parry - m. 1609 Whitestone? poss siblings: Thomas (1612), Agnes (1616?), Susanna (1619), Alice (1621)]

30 March, St. Peter's, Cornhill, London: Francis Brounescombe baptised, son of Alexander and Effyn.

`Thursday, 30 March: Francis son of Alexander Brounescome and Effym his wife brought at bed at Mr. Vowelles house'

15 April, Crediton: Alice, daughter of Robert Bronescombe, is christened. (IGI)

24 April, St. Edmund's, Exeter: Jane Bronscom, & Robert Herden married.

19 October, Chardstock: William Bascombe marries Joan Chub.

5 November, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: Pascowe, daughter of Robert Brounscomb, buried. (EPNI) [baptised, 1619]

According to the Visitation of Devon for this year, Honor, daughter of Thomas & Catherine Mapowder of Holesworthy, Devon (Holsworthy, nr. Bude?), is married to a Branscom of Morchard (Morchard Bishop? Mortham?). [cf: Branscombe of Morton, 1359 & Mapowder, 1699]

The Mayflower sets sail from Rotherhithe for New England, carrying the 102 Pilgrims, including 35 "Brownists", that is, separatists from the Church of England, whose position was thus more extreme than that of the Puritans in general.

`The period in which the Pilgrims lived was oppressive. People were burnt at the stake for saying things that upset the church or state authorities. There was no freedom of religion.

People died for believing in the wrong God. In fact the Spanish Inquisition was developed to hunt down and torture people who were suspected of not having the right religious beliefs. The Roman Catholic church dominated the world and the armies of Europe enforced its rules and regulations. The Thirty Years War tore Europe apart during the period as Catholics and Protestants fought over the fundamental questions of religion.

For decades it was an uncertain and violent world as the Spanish, Dutch and English fought over colonial possessions claiming different parts of America. Explorers like Sir Walter Raleigh were in favor one moment and then beheaded the next. The English King Henry VIII had broken with the Roman Catholic Church, creating the Church of England to facilitate his divorce and the seeds of bitter religious strife began to take root.

The England that the Pilgrims left was an England undergoing great change and upheaval. During the first quarter of the seventeenth century James I authorised the new Bible, Shakespeare was writing provocative plays like "Hamlet" portraying the problems of kings and princes. Ben Jonson was irritating people with his satirical essays, Milton was elevating people's thoughts with such poetic works as "Paradise Lost", John Donne was seducing his ladies with love poems and Francis Bacon was startling society with his scientific essays and lectures.'

Among 2885 emigrants from England to New England who departed during the next thirty years:

Robert Weymouth of Dartmouth, who settled in Kittery, Maine.

John Carter of Branscombe, who settled in Charlestown, Massachusetts.

First weekly newspaper in Europe published in Amsterdam.

Burial of the Emperor Wauli near Beijing - the most spectacular Ming tomb.

The will of Mark Brownscombe of Upton Hellions is administered. [cf: 1612,1619 - duplications? Also cf: 1694 - Andrew Brownscombe of Upton Hellions]

@1621
14 February, Talaton: Peter Branscombe marries Joan Escott. (IGI)

7 October, Whitestone: Alice Brownscombe, daughter of John, is baptised. [poss child of John & Thomasine (Parry - m. 1609 Whitestone?). Poss siblings: Thomas (1612), Agnes (1616?), Susanna (1619), William (1620-1620?)]

The wills of Joane & Thomas Branscombe of Chudleigh are proved the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.

George Brunscombe of Shobrooke (Crediton) and Robert Brownscombe of Cullompton make their wills.

The will of William Bronscombe of Tiverton is proved.

@1622
25 May: Captain John Brooke, Mate Bright, and 142 crewmen of the British East Indiaman Tryal shipwrecked on the western Australian coastline. The heavily-laden vessel had set sail for Java from Plymouth on 4 December 1621. On board was a valuable cargo of trade goods, including golden ornaments, which were highly prized by the Javanese nobility, and about 400 gold doubloons, intended for the Company's trading post at Djakarta. None of this treasure was to reach its destination. Instead, it was scattered across the seabed off the coast of Western Australia. Brooke finally reached Djakarta, then known as Batavia, on 26 June, after a journey of over 1000 kms, in a longboat. Bright sheltered on Barrow Island with another group of survivors, then followed Brooke, arriving in Java on 7 July. Almost one hundred of the crew perished in the shipwreck.

23 June, Littleham: Thomas, poss. seventh and last child of Ellis Branscombe & Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham), is baptised. [poss m. 1646 Susanna Elson? Poss d. 1660? Poss siblings: Wilmot (bp. 1607, poss m. 1638 Simon Hooper?), William (bp. 1609, poss d. 1630?), Joan (bp. 1612), Dyna (1614-1615), Elizabeth (bp. 1616, poss m. 1656 Thomas Langford?), Elias (bp. 1619)]

17 August: Marriage License granted to Tristram Braunscombe of Upton Pyne and Alice Tayler of same.

21 November, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Henry Brenscome marries Jane Webb.(IGI) [IGI notes `relative of Rudolph J Wiley']

1 December, Sandford: Agnes Bunsonne [Branscombe?] & John Jacobbe marry.

15 December, Crediton: Christopher, son of William Brownscombe, christened. (IGI)

Year of an account of the founding of Plymouth in America, in the so-called Mourt Relation. Based in part on Governor William Bradford's history, otherwise destined to remain unpublished for over 200 years.

John Brounscombe of Whitstone makes his will. [A John m. 1609 Whitestone, Thomasine Parry. Poss son of John of Whitestone, mentioned in the 1524, 1544 & 1581 Subsidies for Whitestone, which is about four miles west of Exeter. John & Thomasine may have the following children: Thomas (1612), Agnes (1616?), Susanna (1619), William (1620-1620?), Alice (1621). A John & Thomasine are still around in Whitestone in 1660, to pay the poll tax. Thomasine makes her will in 1641. She is assessed separately for property in Aishbury, in the 1642 Assessment]

`The first regularly published newspaper was the Weekley Newes from Italy, Germany etc., issued in 1622 by Nicholas Bourne and Thomas Archer. Instantly, they were joined by a rival, Nathaniel Butter, who had previously shown that he possessed the true journalistic instinct, by published one-off sheets with details of sensational Yorkshire trials in 1605, and also foreign news, but he missed a golden opportunity to pre-empt the title Newes of the World by choosing the modest Newes from most Parts of Christendom. The first newspaper merger followed and the Butter-Archer team produced Newes of the Present Week. This did not necessarily appear every week, since sometimes there was not a lot happening. Even in the good weeks, the news was contained in a single quarto sheet, but it was publicly available and continued for years.'

Chudleigh: Eliz Brounscombe marries Ric Headon.

Crediton: Thos Brownscombe marries Thom Delve.

@1623
31 August, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Henry, son of Richard Brenscome, christened. (IGI) [cf: 1619 Survey - Richard may be a mariner & poss grandfather of Nicholas of Dawlish? Other children Nicholas (1612), Martin (1614), Margaret (1615)]

`29 Irish persons [were given poor relief] in Dawlish, as well as other persons described as Out of the Lowe Countries, or Out of fflaunders.'

The right of Sanctuary is abolished for criminals.

@1624
7 February, St. David's, Exeter: Simon Branscombe marries Joane Grigge. (IGI)

1 May: Marriage License granted to John Branscombe of Zeal Monachorum and Thomasin Colliton of same..

19 September, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Agnis Branscum, daughter of William Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Poss William bp. 1604 this parish, son of William? cf: 1625 - duplication?]

Captain John Smith, General Historie of Virginia, published.

`Granting a monopoly was the easiest way for the monarch to encourage a trade or an industry, and was also a way to reward courtiers, who did not get salaries and hoped for substantial favours of just this sort. Because grants to courtiers came to be seen as an abuse, monopolies to individuals were prohibited in 1624, but corporations could still receive them, and they continued to be the basis for trade outside Europe in the seventeenth century.'

Crediton: Hy Brownscombe marries My Elston.

@1625
19 September, St. Thomas, Exeter: Agnis, daughter of William Branscum, baptised. (IGI) [cf: 1624 - duplication? William's will, 1635]

Reign of King James I (VI of Scotland) ends (since 1603). Charles I succeeds to the throne (to 1649).

Dutch colonists found New Amsterdam. (New York)

War between England and Spain. `All ships bound for Newfoundland were held back until the Navy had its supplies and crews ensured.'

The wills of Wilmote Brounscombe, widow of Tiverton, and Alice Brownscombe of Crediton, are proven in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.
[Wilmota Bronscombe is taxed in the 1544 Subsidy at Stockleigh English, near Crediton]

Crediton: Jn Brownscombe marries Suz Potter.

@1626
7 June, Crediton: Catheryn, daughter of Robert Brownscomb, is christened. (IGI)

17 July, Heavitree: James, son of John Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss sibling: Richard (1633). John of Heavitree signed the 1641 Protestation]

The wills of John Brownscomb and Edmond Brownscombe of Exeter are administered in the Archdeaconry.

The plague of 1626 led to a serious breakdown of control of the Freedom of the City of Exeter, when tradesmen began to move outside the walls in considerable numbers and to keep shops and hold markets in the suburbs, defying the customary restriction on trading to freemen.' [cf: 1679 - end of the plague in England]

John Bill's map of Wiltshire shows Swindon, Chiseldon, Wootten Bassett, Cricklade, and Shaw!

John Aubrey born (to 1697).

@1627
Original registers of baptisms, marriages and deaths in Dawlish exist from 1627-1975. An index of marriages exists, covering 1605-1837. There are also non-conformist records of the years 1814-37.

Stoke Fleming: John Paige, London merchant, born.

`Like most of the `new merchants' Paige was a Londoner only by adoption. His migration from Stoke Fleming ... was one instance in an established pattern of mobility which had had consequences for London trade ... Paige was first sent to London, after an apprenticeship in Tenerife, by his master Gowen Paynter. Paynter, another West Countryman, was the fifth son in a family of traders and sea captains from Dawlish [cf: Joan Branscombe's will, 1590]. He had been a factor at Tenerife in the 1630s for three London merchants; John Paynter, probably his older brother, and Robert and Richard Lant, sons of an Exeter city mayor and leading City merchants in the Spanish trade.'

@1628
January: Dove, a pinnace, being victualled at Gravesend for a voyage to Bantam for the East India Company. Nicholas Brinscombe will be in the crew. [poss bp. 1612 Plymouth, son of mariner Richard, now aged about 14? Poss father of Nicholas of Dawlish? cf: 1641 Protestation for Dawlish]

18 February: Marriage License granted to Humphrey Pitt of Crediton and Elizabeth Branscombe of same.

2 May, St. Edmund's, Exeter: Thomas Bronscom, servant to Richard Payne, buried. (EPNI)

18 May, Newton St. Cyres: Alice Brownscombe marries William Kemmell. (IGI)

12 June, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: John Branscombe marries Richorde Lucombe.

@1629
June: `The Dutch ship Batavia went aground on the Abrolhos Islands, off the Western Australian coast, near the present town of Geraldton. More than two hundred passengers and crew managed to struggle ashore, and set the scene for one of the bloodiest events in Australian history. Within two days of going aground, Captain Pelsaert, with a small boat and a picked crew, began to explore the islands and mainland for water, prior to sailing north to Batavia. Four Aborigines were sighted on the Australian mainland, but these evaded the Dutch attempts to approach them.'

13 June, Crediton: Charitie Brownscombe marries Thomas Avery. (IGI)

8 August, Shillingford St. George, Devon: John & Mary, son and daughter of John Branscombe, christened.. (IGI)

8 October, Chelvey, Somerset: Walter Brenscombe marries Elizabeth Beacham. (IGI)

Crediton: Phil Brownescombe marries Gra Phillip.

@1630
25 January: Marriage License granted to George Brownscomb junior, of Feniton, and Grace Goule of same. [cf: 1619 poss son of George the butcher?]

12 September, Feniton: Peter, son of Peter Braunscombe, baptised. (IGI) [Peter senior poss son of weaver Osmund & Joan. cf: 1614 will. Peter junior may marry Dorothy Palmer in Feniton in 1649. They may have the following children: Joan (1654), Susanna (1656), Peter (1659), Martha (1664), Nathaniel (1665), Mary (1666), Hanna (1668). Peter junior's will may be administered in 1671]

25 September, St. David's Exeter: Agnis Branscombe marries Gilbert Carpenter.

19 November, Littleham: Bachelor William Branscombe buried (drowned). [poss bp. 1609 Littleham, second child of Ellis & Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham)? Poss siblings: Wilmot (bp. 1607, poss m. 1638 Simon Hooper?), Jone (bp. 1612), Dyna (1614-1615), Elizabeth (bp. 1616, poss m. 1656 Thomas Langford?), Elias (bp. 1619), Thomas (bp. 1622, poss m. 1646 Susanna Elson, poss d. 1660?)]

11 December, Littleham: Ellize Branscombe buried. [poss Ellis, father of William above, and husband of Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham?), OR his son Ellis (bp. 1619)?]

Thomas Halsey of Great Gaddesden, Hertfordshire, Pilgrim, emigrates to New Jersey. Some of his land, in Southampton, Long Island, NY, is still owned by his descendants.

Thomas Holcombe, born at Hole House, Branscombe, son of Gilbert, sails to America in the Mary and John, to found the American Holcombes.

@1631
27 February, St. Edmund's, Exeter: Annis Bronscomb, buried.
(EPNI) [Agnes?]

@1632
Letter from William Hoare, of the East India Company in Bantam, to the Company offices in London, dated 30 January, received 4 September, per London. Crew list of pinnace Dove, engaged in spice trade, includes Nicholas Brinscombe.[poss bp. 1612 Plymouth, son of mariner Richard, now aged about 20? Poss father of Nicholas of Dawlish? cf: 1641 Protestation for Dawlish]

`When English merchants moved out into the world beyond Europe, it was natural enough that the Spice Islands became their ultimate objective. Transport cost so much that it was virtually impossible to make a profit by importing anything that could be produced locally; although salt cod was brought across the Atlantic, in general nothing but luxury goods like gold, silver, furs, and spices would yield a reasonable return after paying for a costly ocean voyage ... Spices suited this situation very well: they had a high value in proportion to their weight, they could not be produced in Europe, and they were always valued by rich people, who used them to mask the taste of the not-too-well preserved meat which was the best that anyone could hope for in the winter.'

Construction of Taj Mahal at Agra.

The will of William Brounscombe of Crediton, is lodged in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.

`The Star Chamber forbade the dissemination of foreign news in 1632, unless an expensive licence was bought.'

@1633
22 April, Heavitree: Richard, son of John Branscombe, baptised. (IGI) [poss sibling: James (1626). John of Heavitree signed the 1641 Protestation]

15 November, Dawlish: Brownscombe? buried. [unclear]

The Inquisition of the Roman Catholic Church forces Galileo Galilei, one of the founders of modern science, to recant, under torture, his theory that the Earth moves around the Sun. As he left the courtroom however, he was reported to have muttered "all the same, it moves".

Robert Waymouth joins the early settlers of Kittery, Maine, the colony organised by Francis Champernowne of Kingswear. He is mentioned in the will of Maine's first governor, Ferdinando Gorges [cf: 1605] in 1661, but is already dead by then.

@1634
William Wood: New England Prospect.

5 May, Whitestone: Agnes Branscombe marries John Pearse. (IGI) [poss child of John & Thomasine (Parry - m. 1609 Whitestone? poss siblings: Thomas (1612), Susanna (1619), William (1620-1620?), Alice (1621)]

23 August, St. M.M., Taunton: Dorothy Branscombe marries William Passion/Passons?].

Captain Bailey, a retired sea-captain, sets up the first Hackney Coach in London, at a stand by St. Clement Danes.

Rubens paints the Adoration of the Magi as an altarpiece for the Convent of the White Nuns at Louvain, Belgium. [now at King's College Chapel, Cambridge]

Crediton: Gra Brownescombe marries Ben Allyn.

@1635
4 February, St. Paul's Exeter: Edward Brancescom marries Jane Auggett.(IGI) [cf: 1638 - duplication?]

8 July: Elizabeth Branscombe and 13 others to be taken from Newgate prison, and delivered to Captain Thomas Hill or Captain Richard Carleton, for transportation to Virginia. To be executed, if she returns.

`Between 1615 and 1775 approximately 50,000 men, women and children were forcibly transported from Great Britain to the American Colonies. By far the largest number were convicted felons, who were destined to toil as plantation servants in the tobacco-growing colonies of Virginia and Maryland ... few of the felons contrived to return to their native country when their sentences expired, and it must be assumed that the great majority were assimilated into American colonial society. Statistically, therefore, they are the ancestors of hundreds of thousands of Americans living today ... to an overwhelming degree, the Colonies were settled by the poor, the dispossessed, and the lawless ... transportees were placed upon ships - usually ex-slavers - and sent to the tobacco colonies where they were sold to the highest bidder for a period of servitude lasting from seven to fourteen years. The arrangement was a happy one for England ... and continued right up to the Revolution.'

27 September, St. Andrew's, Holborn: Elizabeth Branscum marries Thomas Kelaway.

28 October, Sandford: John Bruncecombe, & Dorothy Laughton marry.

20 November, Dawlish: Thomas Brimicombe/Branscombe? buried. [poss. Thomas, mariner, aged 30 in the 1619 Survey?, although there is still a Thomas in Dawlish in 1641]

Date of oldest bell of peal of six at St. Winifred's, Branscombe.

Sir William Pole, antiquary of Colcombe, dies.

`A great Devonshire antiquary whose Collections have been quarried by generations of local historians and genealogists.'

Colcombe Castle, 1 km north of Colyton, came to the Courtenay family in the eighteenth century.

William Brannscombe of St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter, makes his will. [Poss children: William (1604), Thomas (1607), Elizabeth (1609), Joan (1612), all bp. this parish]

The will of Joan Brannscombe of Broad Clyst, is administered in the Archdeaconry of Exeter.

@1636
29 June, Newton St. Cyres: Alice Brownscombe christened, daughter of Philippe and Alice. (IGI)

17 October, Branscombe: John Michell and Nicholas Hewes of Branscombe, gentlemen, and others, surrender their rights in the rectory, parsonage impropriate, tithing garb and sheaf of Branscombe, and also the parsonage barn, to the Dean and Chapter of Exeter Cathedral. [cf: 1705 Elizabeth Michell, only daughter and heir of Benjamin Michell of Seaside, Branscombe. Married 1726 John Heard of Bridgwater, mother of Elizabeth, b. 1726/7 and m. 1747 to James Branscomb of Exmouth .Also cf: 1685 Judge Jeffreys refugees at Seaside Farm]

Most authorities credit Louis XIV with popularising the forerunner of the necktie, the cravat. It was named after the French word for `Croatian'. When a band of Croat mercenaries visited his court in 1636, Louis admired the silk handkerchiefs they wrapped around their necks and tied in front. He made the cravat a prestigious ornament of apparel.

`From the fall of 1636 through the spring of 1637, the English in New England waged a punitive war against the Pequot Indians. The Anglo-Pequot conflict was the outgrowth of a 1634 Pequot assault on an English trading barque on the Connecticut River, which resulted in the death of Captain John Stone and his crew.'

@1637
9 January, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Nicholas Branscombe marries Sussana Sawdon/Samdon? (IGI) [cf: 1677 for possible duplication? Nicholas may be the son of mariner Richard of Plymouth, bp. 1612? May also be the crew member of the pinnace "Dove" which makes a voyage to Bantam for the East India Company, in 1628? May be the Nicholas who baptises a son, Thomas, in Dawlish, 1657?]

23 January, Zeal Monachorum: The will of Thomas Brounscombe is proved before the Court of the Archdeaconry of Barnstaple.

29 January, St. M.M., Taunton: Joane Branskombe marries William [Papp(er)?].

16 April, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Henry Branscomb marries Ann Love. (IGI)

15 October, Bishops Nympton: Anne, daughter of John Brownscombe and Agnes, christened. (IGI)

Thomas Morton: New English Canaan. Contemporary description of early American colonisation.

Crediton: My Brownescombe marries Pet Lupton.

@1638
17 January, Littleham: Wilmot Braunscombe marries Simon Hooper. [Wilmot poss bp. 1607 Littleham, first child of Ellys Branscombe & Jone (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham)? Poss siblings: William (bp. 1609, poss d. 1630?), Dyna (1614-1615), Elizabeth (bp. 1616, poss m. 1656 Thomas Langford?), Elias (bp. 1619), Thomas (bp. 1622, poss m. 1646 Susanna Elson, poss d. 1660?). Simon & Wilmot may have at least 2 children: William (1639), Jane (1645-poss 1667?)]

4 February, St. Paul's, Exeter: Edward Brancescom, marries Jane Auggett. (IGI) [cf: 1635 - duplication?]

21 July, St. Mary Major, Exeter: Susan Bramscombe marries Giles Westcott. (IGI)

Captain John Underhill, News From America. Contemporary account of new colonies.

Delhi replaces Agra as Mughal capital. Red Fort constructed.

Whitstone: poss marriage of Susanna Braunscombe?

@1639
Scottish Rising. (to 1640)

26 January, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Thomas, son of Alexander Bronescombe is christened. (IGI) [cf: 1620 Alexander & Effyn, 1696 will of Richard Hayne]

17 November, Littleham: William, son of Symon Hooper, baptised. [poss first child of Simon Hooper and Wilmot (Branscombe - m. 1648 Littleham)? Poss sibling: Jane (1645-poss 1667?)?]

Dawlish: Nich Brownscombe marries Eliz Murry.

Crediton: Mgt Brownscombe marries Sym Phillip.

@1640
Dawlish: Branscombe & (?) marriage? [only a possible]

Thomazin Bromscombe of Whitston makes her will.
[cf: 1641 - duplication? poss m. 1609 Whitestone, John Branscombe? Whitestone is about four miles west of Exeter. John & Thomasine may have had the following children: Thomas (1612), Agnes (1616?), Susanna (1619), William (1620-1620?), Alice (1621). John & Thomasine are still around in Whitestone in 1660, to pay the poll tax. Thomasine is assessed separately for property in Aishbury, in the 1642 Assessment]

William Bartlet of Branscombe makes his will.

@1641
13 March, Upottery: Mary, daughter of Richard Brannscombe baptised. (IGI)

29 April, St. Martin's, Exeter: Marga Branscomb marries Thomas Berry. (IGI)

12 October, Bishop's Hull, Somerset [Taunton]: Edward, son of Thomas Branscombe, marries Amy Hadden of Creech.

22 August, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: Joshua Braunscombe signs the Protestation. (EBMI) [cf: 1641 Protestation returns for St. Mary Arches, below. Also cf: 1652/3 when Joshua, son of Joseph is baptised in St. Olave, followed by Joshua, son of Joshua, a year later in the same parish]

The unrest which prevails in parliament during the passage of a bill for the Attainder (?) of the Earl of Strafford, leads to the national forced "referendum" known as the Protestation. It was a declaration in support of `... the true reformed Protestant Religion ... against all Popery and Popish Innovations within the Realm.' It was designed to dissuade the king from using his army to threaten parliament, and rescue Strafford, who was confined in the Tower of London. Eventually the tension led to the Civil War, in August 1642 ... The returns are of considerable value to the genealogist and local historian. Not until two hundred years later, with the advent of the first named census returns, is there to be found such a complete listing, parish by parish, of every adult male inhabitant. [However, there are 56 parishes missing in Devon, 48 of which are from the south-east corner of the county, between Exeter and the Dorset border]


PROTESTATION OF 1641

CULLOMPTON PARISH - HAYRIDGE HUNDRED

Robert Brownscombe
Richard Brinscombe

FENITON PARISH - HAYRIDGE HUNDRED

George Branscombe
Peter Branscombe - Overseer

UPLOWMAN PARISH - TIVERTON HUNDRED

Bartholomew Branscombe
John Brownescombe

HEAVITREE PARISH - EXETER

John Branscombe

ST.LEONARD'S PARISH - EXETER

Alexander Brounscombe

ST.MARY ARCHES PARISH - EXETER

Joseph Branscomb

[Joseph is probably a locksmith, apprentice of William Hoppin(g), clock maker, and mentioned in William's will of 1643. In 1646, Joseph Brownscombe, locksmith, becomes a Freeman of Exeter. In 1652, Joshua, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Olave's, followed in 1656 by a son John. In the 1660 Poll Tax, Joseph and his wife are registered at St. Olave's. Also in 1660, another son, Thomas, is baptised to Joseph, this time in St. Mary Arches. The following year, William is baptised, and in 1662 another (or the same?) William. In 1673, Joseph, a locksmith, son of Joseph, succeeds his father as a Freeman of Exeter. In 1683, Mary, daughter of Joseph, is baptised in St. Thomas. Also cf: Branscombe, Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh, lands & marriage settlements ... (EPNI) 96M/47/15]

UPTON HELLIONS PARISH - WEST BUDLEIGH HUNDRED

Andrew Braunscomb
John Brounscomb
Mark Brounscomb

[cf: 1612,1619,1620 - wills of Mark of Upton Hellions. Also cf: 1694 - Andrew Brownscombe of Upton Hellions]

GREAT TORRINGTON PARISH - FREMINGTON HUNDRED

Robert Brimscomb

COOKBURY PARISH - BLACK TORRINGTON HUNDRED

Richard Bromacombe
William Bromacombe
Gregory Bromcombe

DAWLISH PARISH - EXMINSTER HUNDRED

Nicholas Bronscombe

[poss son of Richard, mariner of Plymouth, bp. 1612 St. Andrew's? Poss m. 1637 Exeter, Susanna Sawdon? Poss father of Nicholas of Dawlish, m. 1677 Exeter?]

Thomas Bronscombe
John Hunte
Thomas Hunte
Henry Voyse
Richard Waymouth
Richard Daling - Overseer

MORCHARD BISHOP PARISH - CREDITON HUNDRED

Thomas Brownston

COLEBROOKE PARISH - CREDITON HUNDRED

John Brounscombe

CREDITON PARISH - CREDITON HUNDRED

John Brownscombe
Robert Brownscombe
Robert Brownscombe
Robert Brownscombe
Thomas Brownscombe
William Brownscombe

KENNERLEIGH PARISH - CREDITON HUNDRED

Robert Brunscombe

NEWTON ST.CYRES PARISH - CREDITON HUNDRED

Edward Bowenscombe
Edward Brounscombe
John Brounscombe
Philip Browenscombe

BISHOPS NYMPTON PARISH - WITHERIDGE HUNDRED

John Brownescombe


SOMERSET PROTESTATION RETURNS 1641

CORFE PARISH - TAUNTON DEAN HUNDRED

Richard Bradscume
John Barascume


SOMERSET SUBSIDY ROLLS 1641

OTHERY PARISH - WHITLEY HUNDRED

Margaret Haulsey G3

DRAYTON PARISH - ABDICK & BULSTONE HUNDRED

Alice Hambridge G4


The Irish Troubles.

John Ogilby, map-maker, is in Dublin running a theatre.

Thomazin Brownescombe of Whitston makes her will. [cf: 1640 - duplication? Poss m. 1609 Whitestone, John Branscombe? Whitestone is about four miles west of Exeter. John & Thomasine may have had the following children: Thomas (1612), Agnes (1616?), Susanna (1619), William (1620-1620?), Alice (1621). John & Thomasine are still around in Whitestone in 1660, to pay the poll tax. Thomasine is assessed separately for property in Aishbury, in the 1642 Assessment]

William Brownescombe, of Crediton - testamentary cause.

`The printing of domestic news began when the Star Chamber was suppressed, in 1641. Starting in a modest way, the first Diurnalls
or Mercuries concentrated on political news and comment, mainly critical of the King.'

Whitestone: poss marriage of Thomas Braunscombe and Thomasine Splatt?

Crediton: William Brownscombe, testamentary cause (1641-1648).

Crediton: Thos Brownscombe marries Urs Narramore.

@1642
17 March, St. M.M., Taunton: Thomas Branscomb marries Elizabeth Pardie.

8 August, Dawlish: William Branscombe buried. [reasonably clear]

13 December: In the morning, Abel Tasman sights `a large, high-lying land', which proved to be the south Island of New Zealand, but his course was too far to the north to see even the snowy summits of the ranges that guard the western ramparts of Otago.


1642 ASSESSMENT

AISHBURIE PARISH:

Thomasin Brownescombe assessed at 16s 3d.

[poss m. 1609 Whitestone, John Branscombe? Whitestone is about four miles west of Exeter. John & Thomasine may have had the following children: Thomas (1612), Agnes (1616?), Susanna (1619), William (1620-1620?), Alice (1621). John & Thomasine are still around in Whitestone in 1660, to pay the poll tax. Thomasine makes her will in 1641]


SOMERSET SUBSIDY ROLLS 1642

HILBISHOOPES PARISH - TAUNTON HUNDRED

Thomas Branscombe 0s 5d

[this is Bishops Hull - probably Thomas senior. cf: Protestation Returns 1642]

LYLSDON PARISH - NORTH CURRY HUNDRED

William Halsey 3s 0d


SOMERSET PROTESTATION RETURNS 1642

TAUNTON PARISH - TAUNTON DEAN HUNDRED

William Halsey

DUNSTER PARISH - CARHAMPTON HUNDRED

John Branscombe

HULL TITHING - BISHOP'S HULL PARISH - TAUNTON DEAN HUNDRED

Edward Branscombe
Thomas Branscombe senior
Thomas Branscombe junior

[this may be one family - Edward & Thomas junior may be brothers, Thomas senior their father. See 1641 for possible marriage of Edward. Thomas junior may have married in this year, Elizabeth Pardee, in Taunton district & emigrated to Sussex County, Delaware, cf: 1687]


Taunton, Somerset: poss year of marriage of Thomas Branscombe and Elizabeth Pardee? (IGI)

English Civil War. (to 1651)

@1643
20 May, Dawlish Agnes Branscombe marries Robert Tripe? [cf typed ms. by P.R. Whiteaway, "The History of Rixdale Farm, Dawlish and the Tripe Family", WCSL Exeter]

24 October, Exeter: Joseph Branscombe named in the will of William Hopping of Exeter. Joseph is a locksmith, apprenticed to William, a clock-maker. William's father constructed the famous clock of St. Mary Steps church. The will gives to Joseph `my great buke horn and my vice in the new shop'. Later members of the Hoppin family worked as locksmiths in Exeter well into the eighteenth century. `Three of Hoppin's apprentices became freemen of Exeter - Branscombe, Peter Halstaffe the elder and John Peryam, gunsmith'. [Joseph is registered in the St. Mary Arches parish, in the 1641 Protestation returns. In 1646, Joseph Brownscombe, locksmith, becomes a Freeman of Exeter. In 1652, Joshua, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Olave's, followed in 1656 by a son John. In the 1660 Poll Tax, Joseph and his wife are registered at St. Olave's. Also in 1660, another son, Thomas, is baptised to Joseph, this time in St. Mary Arches. The following year, William is baptised, and in 1662 another (or the same?) William. In 1673, Joseph, a locksmith, son of Joseph, succeeds his father as a Freeman of Exeter. In 1683, Mary, daughter of Joseph, is baptised in St. Thomas. Also cf: Branscombe, Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh, lands & marriage settlements ... (EPNI) 96M/47/15]

`The Royalists started in Oxford the Mercurius Aulicus in 1643, trumped by the London-published Parliamentarian Weekley Intelligencer, and the Mercurius Civicus, which was illustrated. having used the power of the press to help him win, Cromwell suppressed it, and licenced only the official Mercurius Politicus (editor John Milton) and the Publick Intelligencer (editor, the brilliant polemicist Marchmont Nedham).'

Crediton: Rbt Brownscombe marries Thom Temblett.

@1644
2 June, Crediton: Ambrose, son of Grace Brownscombe, christened. (IGI)

Dawlish: William Branscombe buried. [only a possible]

Manchus found Ch'Ing dynasty, China.

Globe Theatre, in Globe Alley Southwark since 1599, burns down.

Crediton: poss marriage of Mary Brounscomb alias Bounsell?

@1645
19 January, Littleham Jane, daughter of Symon Hooper, baptised. [poss d. 1667? Poss second child of Simon Hooper and Wilmot (Branscombe - m. 1648 Littleham)? Poss sibling William (1639)?]

Tasman circumnavigates Australia, and discovers New Zealand. [cf: 1642]

`In the ... parish of Colyton, out of a population which at that time could not have exceeded a thousand souls, there died in the two years 1645-6, of `the sicknesse', as the recording minister
notifies in the margin of the grand old register, four hundred and fifty-eight persons.' (Hamilton Rogers, "Memorials of the West", 1888, p.9)

Civil War: Salcombe Regis said to be the last place to hold out for King Charles.

@1646
18 February, Feniton: Elizabeth Brannscombe marries William Stoakes. (IGI)

30 March, Littleham: Thomas Branscomb, marries Susanna Elson. [Thomas bp. 1622, poss fifth & last child of Elias & Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham? Poss siblings of Thomas: Wilmot (bp. 1607, poss m. 1638 Simon Hooper?), William (bp. 1609, poss d. 1630?), Dyna (1614-1615), Elizabeth (bp. 1616, poss m. 1656 Thomas Langford?), Elias (bp. 1619). Poss children of Thomas & Susanna: William (1647, poss m. 1676 Mary Crutchet?), Art (1649), Thomas (1652, poss m. 1702 Joan Adams? Poss d. 1715), James (1656), Sarah (1659, poss m. 1683 Thomas Wish)?]

11 September: Joseph Brownscombe, locksmith, apprentice of William Hopping, deceased, admitted to the freedom of the city of Exeter. [Joseph is registered in the St. Mary Arches parish, in the 1641 Protestation returns. Apprentice of William Hoppin(g), clock maker, and mentioned in William's will of 1643. In 1652, Joshua, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Olave's, followed in 1656 by a son John. In the 1660 Poll Tax, Joseph and his wife are registered at St. Olave's. Also in 1660, another son, Thomas, is baptised to Joseph, this time in St. Mary Arches. The following year, William is baptised, and in 1662 another (or the same?) William. In 1673, Joseph, a locksmith, son of Joseph, succeeds his father as a Freeman of Exeter. In 1683, Mary, daughter of Joseph, is baptised in St. Thomas. Also cf: Branscombe, Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh, lands & marriage settlements ... (EPNI) 96M/47/15]

John Aubrey (1629-97) comes across the Great Circle of Avebury, while riding to hounds.

`He was so excited by the place that he declared it " ... to exceed Stonehenge as a cathedral does a parish church."' (Godwin & Anderson, p.33)

In the reign of King John, there had been as many as twenty-eight little sandstone churches in Exeter City. But in 1646, an ordnance of Parliament resulted in all but four (St. Petrock, St. Mary Major, St. Mary Arches and St. Edmund) being sold, or used as burying places, or as schools. Happily, many were bought by their parishioners and, two years later, were returned to their proper parochial uses. But immense damage had been done, and some never fully recovered All Hallows on the Walls remained in a ruinous condition until the nineteenth century, when it was wholly removed ... and replaced ... in 1845, with a church of the same name built on a site to the north of the old one.

Crediton: Rbt Brownscomb marries Amy Snow. [cf: 1686, 1694 for other Branscombe/Snow marriages]

@1647
The Commonwealth.

`Exeter's relationship with the English Crown remained a constant: the Semper Fidelis motto bestowed by Elizabeth I saw it through the Civil War with the adaptability of the Vicar of Bray, and it only drew the line at James II, supporting the Duke of Monmouth's rebellion before welcoming William of Orange.'

8 July, Holy Trinity (Christ Church), Cork, Ireland: John Branscom, marries Ann Belcher. (IGI)

2 November, Crediton: Alice Brownscomb marries Robert Gullock. (IGI)

5 December, Littleham: William, first child of Thomas Branscomb of Littleham & Susanna (Elson - m. 1646 Littleham), baptised. [poss m. 1676 Mary Crutchet? Poss siblings: Thomas (1652, poss m. 1702 Joan Adams? Poss d. 1715), James (1656), Sarah (1659, poss m. 1683 Thomas Wish)?]

Dawlish: Eliz Brounscombe marries Jn Lumber.

Crediton: Al Brounscombe marries Rbt Gullocke.

@1648
Crediton: William Brownscombe, testamentary cause (1641-1648).

@1649
14 October, Littleham: Arthur, son of Thomas Branscombe, is baptised.

17 October, Feniton: Peter Brannscombe marries Dorothy Palmer. (IGI) [Peter poss bp. 1630 Feniton, son of Peter, grandson of weaver Osmund & Joan. His father's will may be made this year, or it could be Peter junior's, administered in 1671? Dorothy & Peter may have the following children: Joan (1654), Susanna (1656), Peter (1659), Martha (1664), Nathaniel (1665), Mary (1666), Hanna (1668)]

Peter Osmond/Branscombe of Feniton makes his will. [The will of Osmond Branscombe, weaver of Feniton, is proved in 1614. The will of Peter Branscombe of Feniton, probably his grandson, is administered in 1671. This may be the son of Osmund & Joan, Peter junior's father]

Reign of Charles I ends, (since 1625) when he is beheaded by hangman Richard Brandon. It marks the start of the Interregnum, when various governments of the Commonwealth and Protectorate take over until the Restoration of 1660. `During this period, many ecclesiastical records are fragmentary and probate records will be found in the PCC records at the PRO Chancery Lane.'

Russians reach the Pacific Ocean.

Littleham: Poss year of birth of Art[hur?], child of Thomas Branscombe of Littleham & Susanna (Elson - m. 1646 Littleham)?

@1650
1 August, Holy Trinity (Christ Church), Cork, Ireland: John, son of John & Ann Branscom, baptised. (IGI) [cf: 1658/9, 23 January - George baptised]

Classic Maori period begins on the South Island of New Zealand.

In literature, `coomb' appears in the second half of the sixteenth century, probably introduced from local use; a century later it was still treated as a local southern word.

Branscombe family lands & marriage settlements at Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh. (to 1715) (EPNI)

The first of the Branscombe/Hart marriage settlements (to 1715). [cf: 1712 Branscombe/Hart marriage in Exeter]

Richard Clapp of Sidbury, a sequestration official, sold a tenement in Branscombe to Richard Huse of that parish, and another Branscombe man, Elliss Bartlett (assessment commissioner from 1657) bought a tenement there in 1650 from two carpet-bagging Londoners who had been the first purchasers from the trustees. [cf: 1656 - Grace Clapp]

Littleham: A gap in the burial register, 1650-1657.

Exeter, St. Mary Steps: Jn Branscom marries Ans Squyer.

@1651
1 April: Elizabeth Brinstcome, 'of Banton's of Taws[stock]', is apprenticed for 7 years to Ley of Barnstaple.[Edward Banton/Bainton/Bauton, a general labourer (?) on the Tawstock estate of Henry, fifth Earl of Bath and Rachel, Countess of Bath]

`As late as 1651, a map of Virginia placed the Pacific Ocean a mere 10 days' trek from the head of the James River.'

Prince Charles, later Charles II, hides in an Oak tree in Boscobel Wood during his flight to France, after defeat at the Battle of Worcester. He is reputed to have taken refuge in Bovey House.

End of English Civil War. (since 1642)

[As a result of the Civil War] `... feudal tenures were abolished and replaced by modern freehold ... the English landed class turned lordship into ownership and instead of feudal lords became real owners of the land. This was the most important change in the whole of English history. Instead of drawing labour services or fixed feudal dues in money or kind from their estates, like the Russian or French landlords who could not increase their incomes without cheating or oppressing their peasants, the English landlords could do what they liked with their land. They could farm it, let it to the most efficient farmer for the highest rent, mine the minerals under it, build on it or let it on long leases to developers, or of course sell it for any of these purposes. This freedom to do as they pleased with their land ... was to have a great effect on the coming of the Industrial Revolution and the building of the railways ... this helps to account, too, for the exceptional size and prosperity of the `middle ranks'. The rising incomes of the landed class were spent on consumer goods and improvements to their estates which put money into the pockets of the manufacturers and traders and, as it were, `primed the pump' of the whole economy so that almost everyone had money to spend and almost everyone benefited from the resultant prosperity. Income and small amounts of capital were thus widely diffused, and thousands of small but ambitious businessmen actively sought opportunities for increasing their profits and expanding their turnover.'

@1652
30 May, St. Olave's, Exeter: Joshua, son of Joseph Branscom, christened. (IGI) [Joseph is registered in the St. Mary Arches parish, in the 1641 Protestation returns. Apprentice of William Hoppin(g), clock maker, and mentioned in William's will of 1643. In 1646, Joseph Brownscombe, locksmith, becomes a Freeman of Exeter. In 1656, John, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Olave's. In the 1660 Poll Tax, Joseph and his wife are registered at St. Olave's. Also in 1660, another son, Thomas, is baptised to Joseph, this time in St. Mary Arches. The following year, William is baptised, and in 1662 another (or the same?) William. In 1673, Joseph, a locksmith, son of Joseph, succeeds his father as a Freeman of Exeter. In 1683, Mary, daughter of Joseph, is baptised in St. Thomas. Also cf Branscombe, Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh, lands & marriage settlements ... (EPNI) 96M/47/15]

16 August, Littleham: Thomas, second child of Thomas Branscomb & Susanna (Elson - m. 1646 Littleham), baptised. [poss m. 1702 Joan Adams? Poss d. 1715? Poss siblings: William (1647, poss m. 1676 Mary Crutchet?), Art (1649), Thomas (1652, James (1656), Sarah (1659, poss m. 1683 Thomas Wish)?]

First London coffee-house opened in Cornhill, by Pasqua Rosée, a Turk.

Foundation of Cape Colony by the Dutch.

Crediton: Thom Brownescombe marries Jn Hollerd.

@1653
28 February, St. Olave's, Exeter: Joshua, son of Joshua Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [cf: 1652 Joshua, son of Joseph, baptised in St. Olave]

2 December, Heavitree: Elizabeth, daughter of Richard Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Richard poss b. 1623, son of John? Other poss children of Richard: Elizabeth (1655), John (1657), Mary (1660), James (1663), Katheren (1667), Richard (1670), Richard (1671), Mary (1672)]

The registration of baptisms, marriages & burials passes from ecclesiastical to civil authority, under Cromwell's Commonwealth.

Crediton: Thos Brownescombe marries My Lowman & Jn Brownescombe marries My Terry.

@1654
26 January: A complaint of Thomas Holford of London, white baker, against Michael Chadwell & John Crispe, mentions a tenement occupied by Robert Brancome in Chipping Norton, Oxfordshire.

22 January, Broomfield, Somerset: Clemency Branscombe marries Stephen Young. (IGI) [relative of Brigham Young? cf: IGI entry for 23 Jan 1655 - poss daughter?]

1 February, Feniton: Jone, daughter of Peter Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Peter poss bp. 1630 Feniton, son of Peter, grandson of weaver Osmund & Joan. Peter's will may be administered in 1671? He married Dorothy Palmer, 1649 Feniton. Poss other children: Peter (1659), Martha (1664), Nathaniel (1665), Mary (1666), Hanna (1668)]

Littleham-cum-Exmouth: The Churchwardens' Accounts for the parish church of St. Margaret & St. Andrew this year include:

Paid to Andr. Peryam and his two men for drawinge of stones and laying ye Ch. flore being 28 da. worke ... 1.16.0.

Crediton: Fra Brownescombe marries Mgt Smale.

@1655
23 January, Somerset: Clemency Branscombe marries ? (IGI) [IGI claims this is a marriage, although it notes `no parents are listed', indicating it really means it's a christening. It's an unusual entry, with the note, `Rel: Brigham Young. cf: 1654 22 Jan., a similar entry regarding the marriage of Clemency Branscombe and Stephen Young]

20 September, St. Peter's, Exeter: John Branscombe marries Ann Lea. (IGI) [IGI notes `of Knowstone, Devon, relative of Thomas Harding'. Poss settled Oakford, which is 5 miles east of Knowstone? Poss children: Hugh (1658), Joyce (1661), John (1664), Mary (1666)]

2 December, Heavitree: Elizabeth Branscombe, daughter of Richard, baptised. (IGI) [Richard poss b. 1623, son of John? Other poss children of Richard: Elizabeth (1653), John (1657), Mary (1660), James (1663), Katheren (1667), Richard (1670), Richard (1671), Mary (1672)]

Crediton: Eliz Brownescombe marries Walt Tapper.

@1656
9 February, Feniton: Susanna, daughter of Peter Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Peter poss bp. 1630 Feniton, son of Peter, grandson of weaver Osmund & Joan. A Peter's will administered in 1671. Peter married Dorothy Palmer, 1649 Feniton. Poss siblings: Joan (1654), Peter (1659), Martha (1664), Nathaniel (1665), Mary (1666), Hanna (1668)]

22 March, St. Olave's, Exeter: John, son of Joseph Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Joseph is registered in the St. Mary Arches parish, in the 1641 Protestation returns. Apprentice of William Hoppin(g), clock maker, and mentioned in William's will of 1643. In 1646, Joseph Brownscombe, locksmith, becomes a Freeman of Exeter. In 1652, Joshua, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Olave's. In the 1660 Poll Tax, Joseph and his wife are registered at St. Olave's. Also in 1660, another son, Thomas, is baptised to Joseph, this time in St. Mary Arches. The following year, William is baptised, and in 1662 another (or the same?) William. In 1673, Joseph, a locksmith, son of Joseph, succeeds his father as a Freeman of Exeter. In 1683, Mary, daughter of Joseph, is baptised in St. Thomas. Also cf: Branscombe, Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh, lands & marriage settlements ... (EPNI) 96M/47/15]

26 May, Woodbury, Devon: John Branscombe marries Grace Clapp. (IGI) [this is the first Woodbury reference in the database. There may be some connection, through the christian names of John & Grace's children, to Philip Brenscome & Sibill (Buchal - m. 1604 Crediton) and Phil Brownscombe of Crediton (1597). Poss children: Grace (1657), John (1659), William (1661), Philip (1664), Samuel (1665), Samuel (1670). Poss John's will administered, 1698, Broad Clyst?]

20 August, St. Peter's, Exeter: Mary Branscombe marries Peter Wickett. (IGI)

14 September, Littleham: James, third child of Thomas Branscomb of Littleham & Susanna (Elson - m. 1646 Littleham), born. [poss siblings: William (1647, poss m. 1676 Mary Crutchet?), Art (1649), Thomas (1652, poss m. 1702 Joan Adams? Poss d. 1715), Sarah (1659, poss m. 1683 Thomas Wish)?]

1 December, Littleham: Elizabeth Branscomb, third child of Elias & Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham), marries Thomas Langford. [poss bp. 1616 Littleham? Poss siblings: Wilmot (bp. 1607, poss m. 1638 Simon Hooper?), William (bp. 1609, poss d. 1630?), Dyna (1614-1615),Elias (bp. 1619), Thomas (bp. 1622, poss m. 1646 Susanna Elson, poss d. 1660?)]

Spanish and Portuguese Jews, fleeing the Inquisition, establish the first Jewish congregation in London since 1290.

Crediton: Wm Brownscomb marries Reb Gibbins.

@1657
5 April, Woodbury: Grace, daughter of John Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss first child of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss siblings: John (1659), William (1661), Philip (1664), Samuel (1665), Samuel (1670)]

15 April, St. Gregory's, Dawlish: Thomas, son of Nickolas Brancombe, christened. (IGI) [Nicholas poss son of Richard, mariner of Plymouth, bp. 1612 St. Andrew's? Poss m. 1637 Exeter, Susanna Sawdon? Poss sibling: Nicholas of Dawlish, m. 1677 Exeter?]

26 December, Heavitree: John, son of Richard Branscomb, christened. (IGI) [Richard poss b. 1623, son of John? Other poss children of Richard Elizabeth (1653), Mary (1660), James (1663), Katheren (1667), Richard (1670), Richard (1671), Mary (1672)]

`Shepherds Bush Green is a triangular piece of grass an acre or two in extent. There seems to be no recognized derivation of the curious name. At Shepherd's Bush, in 1657, one Miles Syndercomb hired a house for the purpose of assassinating Oliver Cromwell as he passed along the high road to the town. The plot failed, and Syndercomb was hanged, drawn and quartered in consequence.' (Besant) [if he had waited a year, he could have saved himself the trouble!]

Littleham: A gap in the burial register, 1650-1657.

@1658
26 January, Okeford (Oakford): Hugh Brownscombe baptised, son of John. [poss John & Ann (Lea - m. 1655 St. Peter's, Exeter)? IGI notes `of Knowstone, Devon, relative of Thomas Harding'. Poss other children: Joyce (1661), John (1664), Mary (1666). This is the first entry for Oakford in the current database. Bentley's history of the parish says Brunscombe is not among the top 24 most common names between 1568-1840, but is among the hundred or so others that have more than ten entries in that period. He claims 31 occurrences. He doesn't mention Brownscombe, so it's not clear if this first baptism is part of the 31. The top three names in the Oakford registers, according to Bentley, are Mogford, Radford & Carpenter]

2 October, St. Winifred's, Branscombe: William and Robert Lee, father & son, buried together in the same grave.

READER ASKE NOT WHO LYES HERE
UNLESSE THOU MEANST TO DROP A TEAR
FATHER AND SON HEERE JOYNTLY HAVE
ONE LIFE ONE DEATH ONE TOMB ONE GRAVE
IMPARTIALL HAND THAT DURST TO SLAY
THE ROOTE AND BRANCH BOTH IN ONE DAY
OUR COMFORT IN THERE DEATH IS THIS
THAT BOTH ARE GONNE TO JOY AND BLISS

THE WINE THAT IN THESE EARTHEN VESSELS LAY
THE HAND OF DEATH HATH LATELY DRAWN AWAY
AND AS A PRESENT SERVD IT UP ON HIGH
WHILST HEERE THE VESSELLS WITH THE LEES DOE LYE

9 December, Sandford: Mark Brownscombe, servant to John Colebrone, buried. [cf: 1612,1619,1620 - wills of Mark Brownscombe of Upton Hellions]

Death of Sir Oliver Cromwell. His body is laid out at Somerset House in the Strand. His unpopularity prompted the crowd to throw muck and rubbish at the outside of the building.

@1659
23 January, Holy Trinity (Christ Church), Cork, Ireland: George, son of Clement & Mary Branscom, is baptised. (IGI) [cf: 1662, sister Eliz baptised]

10 February, St. Sidwell's, Exeter: John Branscombe marries Elizabeth Gribble. (IGI)

4 June, Exeter: Lease agreement between Joshua Branscombe, locksmith, and William Pyne, merchant, regarding a wall to be built in a garden owned by Joshua, off Arch Lane, thereby sub-dividing it.

`The west moiety of the garden late in the tenure of Robert Summers of Exeter, apothecary, and now in the tenure of the said Joshua Branscombe, together with a way from the premises through the dwelling house, courtlage and lane adjoining, and belonging to said Joshua Branscombe, and so through the entrance now used into the said garden, which said west moiety of said garden is to be divided from the east moiety by a clobb wall of seven feet high besides the coping, and footed with stone, to be made at the equal costs of said William Pyne and Joshua Braunscombe, within the next twelve months.' [lease surrendered 1672. The 1587 map of Exeter by R. Hogenberg and the 1618 map in Braun & Hoghenbegh's "Civitates Orbis Terrarum" shows a garden in this location]

4 August, Littleham: Sarah, fourth child of Thomas Branscomb of Littleham & Susanna (Elson - m. 1646 Littleham), baptised. [poss m. 1683 Thomas Wish? Poss siblings: William (1647, poss m. 1676 Mary Crutchet?), Art (1649), Thomas (1652, poss m. 1702 Joan Adams? Poss d. 1715), James (1656)?]

24 August, Feniton: Petter Branscombe, son of Peter, baptised. (IGI) [Peter senior poss bp. 1630 Feniton, son of Peter, grandson of weaver Osmund & Joan. A Peter's will administered in 1671. Peter senior married Dorothy Palmer, 1649 Feniton. Poss siblings: Joan (1654), Susanna (1656), Martha (1664), Nathaniel (1665), Mary (1666), Hanna (1668). There is no record, so far of a marriage for this Peter, although a Peter, son of Peter, is baptised in Feniton, 1704]

5 December, Woodbury, Devon: John Branscombe, son of John , christened. (IGI) [poss second child of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss siblings: Grace (1657), William (1661), Philip (1664), Samuel (1665), Samuel (1670). John poss moves to Broad Clyst after marriage to Anne Martinfield, in 1683? Poss children: An (1686), William (1688), Samuel (1691), Sarah (1693), Philip (1694? Poss will administered, 1698?]

Joshua Braunscombe senior, locksmyth, & Joshua junior, Exeter. (EPNI) [are these the same people as Joseph senior & junior, locksmiths?]

French found trading station on the Senegal coast.

`... an armed party from the Dutch flute Elburgh recorded the first, brief description of Aboriginal culture on the west coast [of Australia]. Near Cape Leeuwin, they sighted three Nyungar Aborigines, wearing animal-skin cloaks. At the sight of the sailors, the tribesmen dispersed into the bush, leaving behind their spears, and several small axes used to notch the trees as they climbed in search of possums.'

`After Cromwell's death, Henry Muddiman started the Parliamentary Intelligencer in 1659, and had the sense to rename it the Kingdom's Intelligencer when the king was restored, in 1660.'

Crediton: Gil Brounscombe marries My Fulford.

@1660
6 February: Thomas Branscombe of Littleham drowns. [Poss bp 1622, seventh child of Ellis & Joan (Wheaton - m. 1603 Littleham)? Poss m. 1646 Littleham, Susanna Elson? Poss children: William (1647, poss m. 1676 Mary Crutchet?), Art[hur?] (1649), Thomas (1652, poss m. 1702 Joan Adams - poss d. 1715), James (1656), Sarah (1659, poss m. 1683 Thomas Wish)? According to Hugh Peskett, a memorandum in the Littleham burial register notes that Arthur Herring and Thomas Stiles were also drowned in the same incident, `coming from Torbay']

26 March: Anna Bartlett of Hole House buried at St. Winifred's.

`Here lieth a blossom of the world's great tree
which was as fair as buds of roses be.
She died an infant. Heaven was made for such.
Live like an infant, though shalt have as much.'

April 9, Exeter: Thomas Forward, locksmith, apprentice of Joshua Branscombe, enters the freedom of the city of Exeter.


1660 POLL TAX

one shilling paid on estates worth less than £5 per annum

WHITESTONE PARISH

John & Thomasin Branscombe

[a John Branscombe is assessed in the 1524, 1544 & 1581 subsidies for Whitestone, about four miles west of Exeter. In 1606, John Branscombe of Whitestone makes his will. This John & Thomasine (Parry - m. 1609 Whitestone) appear in the records for Whitestone & Aishbury for the next fifty years. They may have the following children: Thomas (1612), Agnes (1616?), Susanna (1619), William (1620-1620?), Alice (1621). A John makes his will in 1622. Thomasine makes her will in 1641. She is assessed separately for property in Aishbury, in the 1642 Assessment]

CHERITON BISHOP PARISH

Mary Brownscombe

EXETER ST.THOMAS PARISH, WONFORD HUNDRED

Agnes Brownscombe, widow, £12.10s
Thomas Brownscombe of the same family, is listed as a poll tax payer

[cf: 1617 Agnes Mortimore m. Wm Brownscum, St. Thomas]

EXETER ST.OLAVE PARISH

Joseph Branscombe and his wife, 5s.6d

[Joseph is registered in the St. Mary Arches parish, in the 1641 Protestation returns. Apprentice of William Hoppin(g), clock maker, and mentioned in William's will of 1643. In 1646, Joseph Brownscombe, locksmith, becomes a Freeman of Exeter. In 1652, Joshua, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Olave's, followed in 1656 by a son John. Also in 1660, another son, Thomas, is baptised to Joseph, this time in St. Mary Arches. The two parishes are very close and if Joshua lived in or near Arches Lane, (cf: 1659 land transaction in this area) he could have been within just a few hundred yards of either. The following year, William is baptised, and in 1662 another (or the same?) William. In 1673, Joseph, a locksmith, son of Joseph, succeeds his father as a Freeman of Exeter. In 1683, Mary, daughter of Joseph, is baptised in St. Thomas. Also cf: Branscombe, Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh, lands & marriage settlements ... (EPNI) 96M/47/15]

EXETER ST.DAVID PARISH

Edward Branscombe 12d
Another? Edward Branscombe and his wife 12d

Devon & Cornwall Records Vol.#2


7 October, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: Thomas, son of Joseph Braunscom, baptised.
(EPNI) [Joseph is registered in the St. Mary Arches parish, in the 1641 Protestation returns. Apprentice of William Hoppin(g), clock maker, and mentioned in William's will of 1643. In 1646, Joseph Brownscombe, locksmith, becomes a Freeman of Exeter. In 1652, Joshua, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Olave's, followed in 1656 by a son John. In the 1660 Poll Tax, Joseph and his wife are registered at St. Olave's. In 1661, William, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Mary Arches, and in 1662 another (or the same?) William. In 1673, Joseph, a locksmith, son of Joseph, succeeds his father as a Freeman of Exeter. In 1683, Mary, daughter of Joseph, is baptised in St. Thomas. Also cf: Branscombe, Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh, lands & marriage settlements ... (EPNI) 96M/47/15]

Between 1660 and 1716 the names of those sentenced to be hanged for capital offences but thought deserving of clemency were submitted by the Assize Courts to the King's Ministers in London. Most were then extended a pardon on condition of their accepting transportation to an American colony for a set period, usually of seven years.'

??, Heavitree: Marye Branscomb, daughter of Richard, baptised. (IGI) [Richard poss b. 1623, son of John? Other poss children of Richard: Elizabeth (1653), John (1657), James (1663), Katheren (1667), Richard (1670), Richard (1671), Mary (1672)]

Period of Commonwealth ends (since 1649). 29 May: Charles II ascends the throne on his birthday, after 17 years in exile. (to 1685).

End of the Civil Wars. Approximate start of the Restoration. End of the Puritan era.

Exeter, St. Thomas: Pat Brounscombe & Edw Lanne married.

Crediton: Mir Brounscombe marries Edw Geynes. [cf: 1665 marriage of Fra Brounscombe & Eliz Geynes]

@1661
6 January: Marriage allegation between Emanual Bicknoll of Alphington, and Elizabeth Branscomb. Bound by Daniel Smaleridge of Exeter.

9 February, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: William, son of Joseph Braunscom, baptised. (IGI) [Joseph is registered in the St. Mary Arches parish, in the 1641 Protestation returns. Apprentice of William Hoppin(g), clock maker, and mentioned in William's will of 1643. In 1646, Joseph Brownscombe, locksmith, becomes a Freeman of Exeter. In 1652, Joshua, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Olave's, followed in 1656 by a son John. In the 1660 Poll Tax, Joseph and his wife are registered at St. Olave's. Also in 1660, another son, Thomas, is baptised to Joseph, this time in St. Mary Arches. In 1662 another (or the same?) William is baptised in St. Mary Arches. In 1673, Joseph, a locksmith, son of Joseph, succeeds his father as a Freeman of Exeter. In 1683, Mary, daughter of Joseph, is baptised in St. Thomas. Also cf: Branscombe, Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh, lands & marriage settlements ... (EPNI) 96M/47/15]

10 May, Okeford (Oakford): Joyce Brownscombe baptised, daughter of John. [poss John & Ann (Lea - m. 1655, St. Peter's, Exeter)? Poss other children: Hugh (1658), John (1664), Mary (1666)]

21 July, Sowton, Devon: John, son of Bartholomew Brancome, christened.(IGI) [poss first(?) child of Bartholomew & Martha - m. not yet found, who may baptise their next child in Woodbury? If so, they move on again to Withycombe Raleigh, by 1666. Poss other children: William (1662 - Woodbury), Bartholomew (1666), Martha (1669), Jonathan (1673), all bp. Withycombe Raleigh. A Bartholomew is buried there in 1697, poss either the husband of Martha, or the son bp. 1666?]

22 December, Woodbury: William, son of John Brauncombe, baptised. (IGI) [poss third child of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss siblings: Grace (1657), John (1659), Philip (1664), Samuel (1665), Samuel (1670)]

`... the officers and men of sheriff Coplestone Bampfield's regiment, under Lord Lieutenant Monck, presented a loyal address in favour of monarchy and episcopacy, in May 1661; their signatures amount to a roll-call of the gentry [in Exeter] in descending order of social as well as of military rank. JPs and tax commissioners served as senior and junior officers while the most minor gentry, constables and grand jurors like William Babb, George Glanville, Thomas Suxbitch, James Paddon and George Weymouth were included as ensigns and sergeants. In the euphoria of the Restoration, the militia was taken up as the symbol of county solidarity; in the fifties it had suffered as the embodiment of centralist intrusion and sectarian divisiveness.'

Daniel Branscombe of Tiverton makes his will.
[cf: 1670 Tiverton, Daniel m. Barbara Foster. Also cf: 1678 Tiverton, John, son of Daniell, baptised Tiverton]

Ferdinando Gorges, first governor of Maine, dies. His will names an early colonist, Robert Waymouth, as an executor, but he has already died.

Crediton: Marg Brounscombe marries Leo Scut.

@1662
9 February, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: William, son of Joseph Braunscom, baptised. (EPNI) [Joseph is registered in the St. Mary Arches parish, in the 1641 Protestation returns. Apprentice of William Hoppin(g), clock maker, and mentioned in William's will of 1643. In 1646, Joseph Brownscombe, locksmith, becomes a Freeman of Exeter. In 1652, Joshua, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Olave's, followed in 1656 by a son John. In the 1660 Poll Tax, Joseph and his wife are registered at St. Olave's. Also in 1660, another son, Thomas, is baptised to Joseph, this time in St. Mary Arches. In 1661, another (or the same?) William is baptised in St. Mary Arches. In 1673, Joseph, a locksmith, son of Joseph, succeeds his father as a Freeman of Exeter. In 1683, Mary, daughter of Joseph, is baptised in St. Thomas. Also cf: Branscombe, Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh, lands & marriage settlements ... (EPNI) 96M/47/15]

15 March, Woodbury: William, son of Barth Braunscombe, baptised. (IGI) [poss second child of Bartholomew & Martha - m. not yet found? If so, they may have been in Sowton in 1661, and may move to Withycombe Raleigh by 1666? Poss other children: John (1661 - Sowton), Bartholomew (1666), Martha (1669), Jonathan (1673), all bp. Withycombe Raleigh. William may marry Joan ? before 1689, when a child, Charity, is baptised to them, in Withycombe? William poss d. 1716, Withycombe?]

28 April, Holy Trinity (Christ Church), Cork, Ireland: Eliz, daughter of Clemment & Mary Branscom, is baptised. (IGI) [cf: 1658/9, 23 January - brother George]

17 July: Warrant from Treasurer at Southampton to Customs Commissioners for discharge of a seizure, at Minehead, of some cattle and sheep belonging to John Branscombe of Ireland. A petition from John Branscombe is attached.

The will of Robert Brownscombe of Crediton is proved in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.

Mary Branscombe of Feniton makes her will. [cf: 1666 Feniton, Mary baptised, daughter of Peter Branscombe & Dorothy (Palmer - m. 1649 Feniton)]

From 1662-83, England holds Tangier, thus commanding the entrance to the Mediterranean.

John Branscombe, Keeper of the Treasury of Ireland. [cf: 1647,1665, 1672]

Royal Society incorporated.

Dawlish: poss marriage of Elizabeth Branscombe?

@1663
??, Heavitree: James, son of Richard Branscomb, christened. (IGI) [Richard poss b. 1623, son of John? Other poss children of Richard Elizabeth (1653), John (1657), Mary (1660), Katheren (1667), Richard (1670), Richard (1671), Mary (1672)]

21 December, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: ? Branscom, baptised.

The will of Elizabeth Brawnscombe of Tiverton is administered in the Archdeaconry of Exeter.

Thomas Newcomen, inventor of the first effective steam pump (called an atmospheric engine), is born in Dartmouth.

Littleham-cum-Exmouth: The Churchwardens' Accounts of the parish church of St. Margaret & St. Andrew for this year contain the following entry for a collection made by Thomas Weekes, warden:

Collected for hexham brige in the county of Northumberland the sum of ... 2s 6d.

Crediton: Eliz Brounscombe marries Rbt Lock & Wm Brounscombe marries Agn Jesson.

@1664
30 May, Okeford (Oakford): John Brownscombe baptised, son of John & Ann. [John senior poss m. 1655, St. Peter's, Exeter, Lea? IGI notes `of Knowstone, Devon, relative of Thomas Harding'. Poss other children: Hugh (1658), Joyce (1661), Mary (1666)]

Approximate year of birth of John Branscomb, who dies in Bampton in 1727. [cf: 30 May, John Brownscombe bp. Bampton is 2½ miles from Oakford]

14 August, Woodbury: Philip, son of John Brannscombe baptised. (IGI) [possible fourth child of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656)? Poss siblings: Grace (1657), John (1659), William (1661), Samuel (1665), Samuel (1670). Philip probably becomes Overseer of Apprentices in Woodbury 1697 & 1702? Poss father of John (1700), Philip (1705), Hannah (1706)? cf: 1604 Philip of Crediton, poss grandfather?]

27 December, Feniton: Martha Branscombe, daughter of Petter, baptised. (IGI) [Peter poss bp. 1630 Feniton, son of Peter, grandson of weaver Osmund & Joan. Peter's will may be administered in 1671? He married Dorothy Palmer, 1649 Feniton. Poss other children: Joan (1654), Susanna (1656), Peter (1659), Nathaniel (1665), Mary (1666), Hanna (1668)]


Somerset Hearth Tax 1664/5

Hull Episcopi parish: Edward Branscombe

[Bishops Hull - This is probably Edward, son of Thomas, who married Amy Hadden in 1641, and who is recorded, possibly with his (younger?) brother Thomas, in the 1642 Protestation Returns. Thomas junior may have emigrated to Sussex County, Delaware. cf: 1687]


@1665
John Branscombe buys land in Isle of Wight County, Virginia. (EPNI) [cf: 1668]

11 March, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: Sarah Branscome, daughter of Joshua, baptised. (IGI)

19 March, Woodbury: Samuell Braunscombe, son of John, baptised. (IGI) [poss fifth child of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss siblings: Grace (1657), John (1659), William (1661), Philip (1664), Samuel (1670)]

30 April, Crediton: Lease and Release by Robert Hall of Exeter, to Thomas Westlake & Thomas Wright of Exeter, and Walter Tuckfield of Shobrooke, gentlemen, of two tenements in Colebrooke, Sandford and Crediton called Lower Wotton and Little Bradleigh, parcels of lands called Little Fullforde now or late in the tenure of John Rowe and Robert Branscombe. (EPNI)

17 December, Feniton: Nathaniell Branscombe, son of Petter, baptised. (IGI) [Peter poss bp. 1630 Feniton, son of Peter, grandson of weaver Osmund & Joan. Peter's will may be administered in 1671? He married Dorothy Palmer, 1649 Feniton. Poss other children: Joan (1654), Susanna (1656), Peter (1659), Martha (1664), Mary (1666), Hanna (1668)]

`[Henry] Muddiman contrived to start the Oxford Gazette in 1665. This became the London Gazette in early 1667, published bi-weekly ever since as the official organ of the government, announcing bankruptcies, naturalisations and official measures - everything but general news.'

Crediton: Jn Brounscombe marries Rich Webber & Fra Brounscombe marries Eliz Geynes. [ cf: 1660 marriage of Mir Brounscombe & Edw Geynes, Crediton]

@1666
9 February, Feniton: Mary, daughter of Petter Branscombe, baptised. (IGI) [Peter poss bp. 1630 Feniton, son of Peter, grandson of weaver Osmund & Joan. Peter's will may be administered in 1671? He married Dorothy Palmer, 1649 Feniton. Poss other children: Joan (1654), Susanna (1656), Peter (1659), Martha (1664), Nathaniel (1665), Hanna (1668)]

2 March, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: Sarah, daughter of Joshua Branscombe, baptised. (Born, St. Olave's) (EPNI)

8 March, Thames Ditton, Surrey: Ealesaberth, daughter of Josioas Brancom, is christened. (IGI) [cf: 1679 poss sister Mare & 1682 poss brother John baptised, Thames Ditton]

25 October, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Mary Brownscombe baptised, daughter of John & Ann. [poss John & Ann (Lea - m. 1655 Exeter)? Poss other children: Hugh (1658), Joyce (1661), John (1664)]

28 November: Marriage allegations between Phillipp Braunscombe of Nymett Episcopi and Margery Mildon. Bound by Phillip Ley of Stockley Pomeroy.

Bishop's Nympton: poss marriage of Phillipp Braunscombe to Margery Milden?

20 December, Withycombe Raleigh: Bartholomu, son of Bartholomu & Martha Branscom, christened. (IGI) [or 1665? Poss third child of Bartholomew & Martha - m. not yet found? If so, they may have been in Sowton in 1661, and may move to Withycombe Raleigh by 1666? Poss other children: John (1661 - Sowton), William (1662 - Woodbury), Martha (1669), Jonathan (1673), all bp. Withycombe Raleigh. This is the first Withycombe reference, this century]

The Great Fire of London starts in Pudding Lane. An estimated 80% of the city is destroyed in four days, including 13000 houses, 87 parish churches, 44 Livery companies, Guildhall and St. Paul's. As much as two-thirds of the population may have perished.

An Act of Parliament of this year stipulated that all persons being buried in England should be shrouded in wool and no other material. This was to help the wool industry. A register had to be kept for each parish and the relatives of those not "buried in woolen" were subject to a fine. There was a reward for those who brought the attention of the authorities to an illegal burial. Wealthier families who didn't want their members buried in wool informed on each other, thereby reducing the cost of the fine by the value of the reward.

@1667
15 March, Littleham: Jane, daughter of Symon Hooper, buried. [poss bp. 1645 Littleham, the second child of Simon Hooper and Wilmot (Branscombe - m. 1648 Littleham)? Poss sibling: William (1639)?]

22 December, Heavitree: Katheren, daughter of Richard Branscomb, baptised. (IGI) [Richard poss b. 1623, son of John? Other poss children of Richard: Elizabeth (1653), John (1657), Mary (1660), James (1663), Richard (1670), Richard (1671), Mary (1672)]

The first of the Branscombe/Dollen marriage settlements (to 1810).

@1668
9 August, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: Samuell, son of Joshua Branscome, baptised. (IGI & EPNI) [cf: 1670]

17 December, Feniton: Hanna, daughter of Peter Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Peter poss bp. 1630 Feniton, son of Peter, grandson of weaver Osmund & Joan. Peter's will may be administered in 1671? He married Dorothy Palmer, 1649 Feniton. Poss other children: Joan (1654), Susanna (1656), Peter (1659), Martha (1664), Nathaniel (1665), Mary (1666)]

The will of Catherine Brownscombe, widow of Crediton, is proved in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.

Crediton: poss marriage of Mary Branscombe?

Crediton: David Brownscombe, testamentary cause.

John Branscombe's land in Isle of Wight County, Virginia sold, due to his disappearance. (?) The Court Order Books for July contain the following:

William Boddie & Anna his wife to Henry Joyce a parcel of land on Cypress Swamp formerly let by Wm. Boddie to John Branscombe, now ack. to Henry Joyce.

@1669
8 February, Withycombe Raleigh: Martha, daughter of Bartholomu & Martha Branscom, baptised. (IGI) [poss fourth child of Bartholomew & Martha - m. not yet found? If so, they may have been in Sowton in 1661, and may move to Withycombe Raleigh by 1666? Poss other children: John (1661 - Sowton), William (1662 - Woodbury), Bartholomew (1666), Jonathan (1673), all bp. Withycombe Raleigh]

February: John Pearse, felt maker of Sowton, reprieved for Barbados.

22 June: Andrew Branscombe, husbandman of Cullompton, reprieved by the Devon Assize Court, probably from a sentence of hanging, to be transported to Barbados, usually for a period of seven years, under bondage as a "plantation servant".

@1670
8 May, Woodbury: Samuel Brannscombe son of John, baptised. (IGI) [poss sixth and last child of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss siblings: Grace (1657), John (1659), William (1661), Philip (1664), Samuel (1665)]

11 May, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: Samuel Branscomb, buried. (EPNI) [cf: 1669]

23 May, St. James, Huish-by-Hatherleigh: Joane, daughter of John Branchcombe & Mellicent, christened. (IGI)

21 August, Heavitree: Richard Branscomb, son of Richard, baptised. (IGI) [Richard poss b. 1623, son of John? Other poss children of Richard: Elizabeth (1653), John (1657), Mary (1660), James (1663), Katheren (1667), Richard (1671), Mary (1672)]

13 December, Tiverton: Daniell Branscombe marries Barbara Foster. (IGI) [cf: 1670, Daniel of Tiverton makes his will. Also cf: 1678 John, son of Daniell, baptised Tiverton]

Daniel Denton's "A Brief Description of New York" published.

Dawlish: George Cole is Churchwarden.

Richard Branscombe of east Devon is a planter at St. Johns, Newfoundland, flourishing between 1670 and the 1680s. He had a wife and daughter, but no sons. He employed 5-10 men with one or two fishing boats.

@1671
14 January, Heavitree: Richard Braunscom, son of Richard, baptised. (IGI) [Richard senior poss b. 1623, son of John? Other poss children of Richard senior: Elizabeth (1653), John (1657), Mary (1660), James (1663), Katheren (1667), Richard (1670), Mary (1672). Richard junior poss m. 1687 Heavitree, Kathren Dives?]

Hearth Tax: In St. Olave parish, Exeter, Joshua Branscombe is assessed on 3 hearths.

The will of Peter Branscombe of Feniton is administered in the Archdeaconry of Exeter. [Probably bp. 1630 Feniton, son of Peter & grandson of weaver Osmund & Joan. Married Dorothy Palmer, 1649 Feniton. Poss children: Joan (1654), Susanna (1656), Peter (1659), Martha (1664), Nathaniel (1665), Mary (1666), Hanna (1668)]

@1672
23 February, Heavitree: Mary Branscomb, daughter of Richard, baptised. (IGI) [Richard poss b. 1623, son of John? Other poss children of Richard: Elizabeth (1653), John (1657), Mary (1660), James (1663), Katheren (1667), Richard (1670), Richard (1671)]

14 July, Halberton, Devon: Elizabeth, daughter of James Branscomb, christened.(IGI)

The Will of John Branscombe [Branscomb] of Cork, Ireland, granted probate.

Sir William Petty's Survey of Ireland suggests there are 800,000 Irish, 200,000 English, and 100,000 Scots living there.

15 October, Exeter: Joshua Branscombe, locksmith, and William Pine, merchant, surrender the lease on a garden `late in the occupation of Robert Summers', to Sir John Malet of St. Audries, Somerset. (EPNI) [off Arch Lane, leased since 1659]

Newfoundland: Richard Branscombe arrives at St. John's. By 1677, he is described as a `planter'.

Crediton: Ja Brounscomb marries Nat Vicary.

@1673
7 April, Withycombe Raleigh: Jonathan, son of Bartholomu & Martha Branscom, christened. (IGI) [poss fifth child of Bartholomew & Martha - m. not yet found? If so, they may have been in Sowton in 1661, and may move to Withycombe Raleigh by 1666? Poss other children: John (1661 - Sowton), William (1662 - Woodbury), Bartholomew (1666), Martha (1669), all bp. Withycombe Raleigh]

17 November: Thomas Norris, locksmith, apprentice of Joshua Branscombe, is made a Freeman of the city of Exeter.

John Brounscomb a resident of Thorverton when rated this year for repairs to parish church, and poor rate. (EBMI) [cf: 1697 Thorverton - Mary, daughter of John Branscombe, baptised]

Joseph Branscombe, locksmith, succeeds his father Joseph as a Freeman of the city of Exeter. [Joseph is registered in the St. Mary Arches parish, in the 1641 Protestation returns. Apprentice of William Hoppin(g), clock maker, and mentioned in William's will of 1643. In 1646, Joseph Brownscombe, locksmith, becomes a Freeman of Exeter. In 1652, Joshua, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Olave's, followed in 1656 by a son John. In the 1660 Poll Tax, Joseph and his wife are registered at St. Olave's. Also in 1660, another son, Thomas, is baptised to Joseph, this time in St. Mary Arches. The following year, William is baptised, and in 1662 another (or the same?) William. In 1683, Mary, daughter of Joseph, is baptised in St. Thomas. Also cf: Branscombe, Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh, lands & marriage settlements ... (EPNI) 96M/47/15]

Crediton: poss marriage of Ambrose Branscombe and Jane (Norns?)?

@1674
9 February, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: Elizabeth Branscombe marries John Brooking. (IGI)

6 August, Woodbury: John Branscombe, Churchwarden, witnesses an apprentice document.

27 September, Crediton: Dorothy, daughter of Francis Brownescomb, christened. (IGI)

`We shall be near enough to the truth if we say that there were about 40,000 families in Devon, in 1674.'

`There was a remarkable amount of movement among all classes in Devon below the landed class. The squire and the big freeholder might remain rooted in the same parish for centuries, but the rest of the population measured its' stay by generations. In a sample of 7 parishes of various types scattered all over the county, (including Branscombe) we find that between forty and seventy percent of the family names disappear from the parish register within a hundred years. The average rate of disappearance is nearly 60% in the 17th. & 18th. centuries. Over a space of 200 years, more than four families in five disappear from their ancestral parishes. Branscombe and Huntsham show the lowest figures in the sample, and even here, two out of three have disappeared, in 200 years.'(Ibid., p.173)

`The large-scale rises in the rates of admissions to the Freedom of the City of Exeter after 1660 ... were for political rather than economic reasons. The admission of more than three hundred entrants in the year ending Michaelmas 1674, for example, was [due] to the contested parliamentary by-election of 20 November 1673. The influxes of 1660 and 1661 were similarly due to elections. In all cases, whether the influx was due to parliamentary politics, or to an attempt at enforcement by the Chamber, nearly all the admissions were by apprenticeship or succession.'

`The hearth tax was introduced early in 1662, two years after the accession of Charles II, in order to make up a deficiency of £300,000 in the £1,200,000 permanent annual revenue which had been granted to the king by the Commons. It never succeeded in achieving this amount ... It was repealed by William III in 1689.'

The first tax [there were two later versions] was an annual payment of 2/- for every hearth, paid in two equal installments, at Lady Day and Michaelmas. It was paid by the occupier, not the landlord, although this was later changed. The main exemption was on the grounds of poverty, hence the lists of "poore".


DEVON HEARTH TAX RETURNS

Lady Day, 1674

THORVERTON PARISH - HAYRIDGE HUNDRED

Jon Brownscomb 3

TOTAL FOR THIS PARISH 176

TIDCOMBE QUARTER - TIVERTON HUNDRED

Thomas Brownscom 3

CREDITON PARISH - CREDITON HUNDRED

Rob Bounscombe 2

The poore of Crediton

Jonathan Brownscomb 1
Jonathan Brounscombe 1
Wm Branscom 1
Fran Branscom 1
Thomas Brownscom 1
Andrew Pearse 1

TOTAL FOR THE POOR 362

TOTAL FOR CREDITON 813

MORCHARD BISHOP PARISH - CREDITON HUNDRED

The poore of Morchard Bishop

Jno Brounsdon 1

TOTAL 73

COOKBURY PARISH - BLACK TORRINGTON HUNDRED

Mr. George Jewell 2
Richard Brownscombe 1
Wm Gay 2

TOTAL FOR HUNDRED 3822

DARTMOUTH PARISH - COLERIDGE HUNDRED

The poore of Dartmouth

Jone Branscomb 1

TOTAL: 109

More relieved 40

DODBROOKE PARISH - COLERIDGE HUNDRED

James Wemoth 4
Rob Pearse 1
Jon Wemoth 2

DAWLISH PARISH - EXMINSTER HUNDRED

The manuscript is only partly readable, the rest being mutilated. 65 occupiers, with 157 hearths, can be counted. The 1662 return had 84 chargeable occupiers with 181 hearths.

Wd Painter 1
Fran Southcott 5
Jon Painter 1

Dawlish paupers

Jon Bowdon 1
Hen Voysey 1
Laur Bowdon 1
Wd Beard 1

BRANSCOMBE PARISH - COLYTON HUNDRED

Mr. Bartlett 10

STOKE GABRIEL PARISH - HAYTOR HUNDRED

Mich Sterling 2

PLYMOUTH PARISH

Paupers of Plymouth

Will Jewell 1
Basheba Weimouth 1
Susan Pearce ?

TOTAL: 176
More relieved... 130

ST. MARY CHURCH PARISH - HAYTOR HUNDRED

Rob Waymouth ?
Rich Waymouth 1
Mary Winmouth 1

TOTAL: 111

COCKINGTON PARISH - HAYTOR HUNDRED

Mr. Waymouth 2
? Pearse 2

TOTAL: 98

TORMOHAM PARISH - HAYTOR HUNDRED

Tho Waymouth 2
Sitherick Widmoth 1


@1675
5 May, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): John Brownscombe buried. [poss bp. 1664? Poss son of John & Ann (Lea - m. 1655 Exeter? Poss siblings: Hugh (1658), Joyce (1661), Mary (1666)]

7 May, Silverton, Devon: Joane, daughter of Mary (Janson/Branscombe?) christened. (IGI)

20 September, Exeter: John Brandscombe marries Anne Leigh. (IGI) [cf: 1799 Honour Leigh. IGI notes `relative of Daniel McDougall']

17 October, Crediton: Ann, daughter of Gilbert Brownescomb, is christened. (IGI)

Map-maker John Ogilby establishes the Statute Mile as 1760 yards. Formerly, three differing lengths were in use.

Dawlish: poss Elizabeth Branscombe marries ?

@1676
7 February, St. Mary Arches, Exeter: Joshua Branscombe marries Joan Tapley. (IGI)

23 February, Littleham: William Branscombe marries Mary Crutchet. [Earl Kennedy transcription says that Mary was "of Axmouth". William poss bp 1647, first child of Thomas of Littleham & Susanna (Elson - m. 1646 Littleham)? Poss siblings: Thomas (bp 1652, m. 1702, d. 1715?), James (1656), Sarah (bp 1659, m. 1683?). Poss children of William & Mary: William (1679), James (1681), William (bp 1682, poss m. 1712 Elizabeth Hart? d. 1728?), Simon (bp 1684, m. 1712 Elizabeth Weeks? d. 1741?), James (bp 1686, m. 1708 Magdalene Hancock, Exeter?), Arthur (bp 1689), Sarah (bp 1659, m. 1683?)? William senior poss d. 1728 Littleham? Mary Crutchet bp 6 Feb 1647 Littleham, the seventh child of Simon Crutchet & Katherine (Crosse - m.26 Feb 1654 Littleham)?]

26 April, Stotfold, Bedfordshire: Thomas Branscom of Covent Garden marries Ann Squire of Millbrook.

The Great Fire of Southwark.

John Ogilby's Brittania Road Atlas published. The improvement in roads, and the development of the coaching system produced a demand for a new kind of map, quite different from the road-less decorative masterpieces which preceded it.

The will of James Rodd Snr refers to lands he owns in and around Dawlish. [cf: 1724, will of Nicholas Branscombe]

Arthur & Deborah Branscomb settle in Boston. Cletie Elroy Branscome claims after Arthur died, Deborah and their two daughters moved to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, in 1711.

@1677
Wren's Monument to the Great Fire of London, completed.

6 January, Chardstock: John Wall marries Thomasin Brounscombe,.

9 January, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Nicholas Brounscomb marries Susanna (Sawden/Bawden?). [Earl Kennedy transcription says Nicholas "of Dawlish" and Susanna "Bowden". cf: 1637 for possible duplication? Also cf: 1681 - possibly Nicholas & Susan of Dawlish. Poss children: Elizabeth (1679), Thomas (1681), Nicholas (1685-1692?), John (1687), (Susanna/Sarah? - 1689)]

12 April, St. Mary The Virgin, Sunbury, Middlesex: Josias Brancsom of East Molesey marries Katherin Palmer, by licence.

`Marriage by licence was a speedier alternative [to the issuing of banns in both parishes] involving payment of a fee instead of residence qualifications. Licences were obtained from the bishop's or archbishop's surrogates - their official representatives. The bonds and allegations which accompanied licences usually contain more information about the parties concerned than is found in a register entry, including their parish of origin, trade or profession, age, and sometimes the name of the groom's father or brother if he were standing as a surety in the bond. In most cases it is these documents rather than the licences themselves which have survived.'

27 June, Crediton: Ann, daughter of John Brownescomb, christened. (IGI)

`Of necessity we must always be Sailing round about the Island, carrying and recarrying such heavy Commodities from Port to Port, to be taken into the more Inward parts of the Kingdom, otherwise the charge of carrying such goods by Land would rise to a very vast charge, the High-ways of our island being very uneven, and the ways therein in Winter time very bad.'

St. John's Harbour, Newfoundland: Richard Brumscen is registered in a census with his wife, son, no daughters, and two men. [poss arrived 1672?]

Crediton: Jn Brownescombe marries Bri Dotherridg.

@1678
1 October, Tiverton: John, son of Daniell Branscomb, christened. (IGI) [Daniel Branscombe & Barbara Foster m. 1670 Tiverton]

The Exeter customs house at the quay dates from this year.

Feniton: poss marriage of Joan Branscombe?

Littleham: A gap in the burial register, 1678-1743.

@1679
25 April: Marriage allegation between John Branscombe of Morchard Bishop and Elizabeth Philpe of same.

25 June, Woodbury: John Braunscombe, Churchwarden, mentioned in a document about apprentices.

31 July, Littleham: Thomas, first child of William Branscombe of Exmouth & Mary (Crutchet - m. 1676 Littleham), baptised. [poss siblings: James (1681), William (bp 1682, d. 1728?), Simon (bp 1684, d. 1741?), James (bp 1686), Arthur (bp 1689), Sarah (bp 1659, m. 1683?)? William senior poss d. 1728 Littleham?]

14 September, Thames Ditton, Surrey: Mare, daughter of Josif Brancom, baptised. (IGI) [cf: 1682 poss brother John & 1666 poss sister Elizabeth baptised, Thames Ditton]

16 November, St. Gregory's, Dawlish: Elezabeth, daughter of Nickolas Branscame, christened. (IGI) [Poss siblings: Thomas (1681), Nicholas (1685-1692?), John (1687), (Susanna/Sarah? - 1689). Elizabeth poss m. 1703 Highweek, Peter Crapp, mariner of Kenton?]

`Along with famines, epidemics [were] great killers, particularly the plague or Black Death. There was no more plague after 1679 though why is not at all clear.'

Colaton Raleigh: `Drupe Farm (now transformed into holiday cottages) was, in 1330, the home of William atte Thrope. In 1388 it was called Thorp and became Droope in 1679. The name is interesting in being the only example of the Old English Thorp (roughly, a dependent or outlying dairy farm belonging to a village or manor) which has been noted, in Devon.'

Morchard Bishop: poss marriage of John Branscombe and Eliza (Philpe?).[cf: 1679 marriage allegation]

@1680
A Devonshire ship's captain, Nicholas Branscombe, said to be of Topsham, is thought to have flourished in the Newfoundland fishing trade between 1680-1710. He was in the employ of merchants of Dartmouth for some years. He is connected with at least two ships, both of Topsham: The True Intent (95 tons) and the Susannah & Mary (130 tons).

Crediton: Wm Brownscomb marries An Heaydon.

@1681
28 March, Littleham: James, second child of William Branscombe of Exmouth & Mary (Crutchet - m. 1676 Littleham), baptised. [poss siblings: William (1679), William (bp 1682, d. 1728?), Simon (bp 1684, d. 1741?), James (bp 1686), Arthur (bp 1689), Sarah (bp 1659, m. 1683?)? William senior poss d. 1728 Littleham?]

15 November, Dawlish: Thomas, son of Nicholas Brownscomb, born. [poss. Nicholas & Susan, m. 1677? Thomas may have married Joan Adams, 1702 Littleham? Poss siblings: Elizabeth (1679), Nicholas (1685-1692?), John (1687), (Susanna/Sarah? - 1689)]

St. John's, Newfoundland: A census lists Richard Branscom owning two boats and ten servants. [poss arrived Newfoundland 1672? Also cf: 1677 census]

@1682
11 January, Thames Ditton, Surrey: John, son of Jousif Brancom, is christened. (IGI) [cf: 1666 poss sisters Elizabeth & 1669 Mare, baptised, Thames Ditton?]

5 July: Marriage allegation between Walter Warren of Crediton and Julian Bragg of Colebrook. Bound by John Branscombe of Crediton.

15 July, Littleham: William, third child of William Branscomb of Exmouth & Mary (Crutchet - m. 1676 Littleham), baptised. [poss siblings: William (1679), James (1681), Simon (bp 1684, d. 1741?), James (bp 1686), Arthur (bp 1689), Sarah (bp 1659, m. 1683?)? William senior poss d. 1728 Littleham? William]

Alphington: poss Elizabeth Branscombe marries ?

Crediton: My Brownescombe marries Rbt Waring.

@1683
30 May, St. David's, Exeter: Jonathan Branscomb marries Ann Martynfill. [poss John bp. 5 December 1659, Woodbury, son of John Branscombe. Poss second child of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss siblings: Grace (1657), William (1661), Philip (1664), Samuel (1665), Samuel (1670). John poss moves to Broad Clyst after marriage to Anne Martinfield? Poss children of John & Anne: An (1686), William (1688), Samuel (1691), Sarah (1693), Philip (1694? Poss will administered, 1698?]

Woodbury: poss marriage of John Branscombe and Ann Martinfield?

31 May: Allegation of marriage between John Branscombe junior, of Woodbury and Anne Martinfield of Broadclyst.

5 August, Holy Trinity, Exeter: Mary Branscomb marries Adame Silk.

8 September, St. John's, Exeter: Mary Branscomb, daughter of Joseph, baptised. (IGI) [Joseph is registered in the St. Mary Arches parish, in the 1641 Protestation returns. Apprentice of William Hoppin(g), clock maker, and mentioned in William's will of 1643. In 1646, Joseph Brownscombe, locksmith, becomes a Freeman of Exeter. In 1652, Joshua, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Olave's, followed in 1656 by a son John. In the 1660 Poll Tax, Joseph and his wife are registered at St. Olave's. Also in 1660, another son, Thomas, is baptised to Joseph, this time in St. Mary Arches. The following year, William is baptised, and in 1662 another (or the same?) William. In 1673, Joseph, a locksmith, son of Joseph, succeeds his father as a Freeman of Exeter. Also cf: Branscombe, Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh, lands & marriage settlements ... (EPNI) 96M/47/15]

27 December, Littleham: Sarah Branscomb marries Thomas Wish. Both of Exmouth. [poss bp 1659, fourth child of Thomas Branscombe & Susanna (Elson - m. 1646 Littleham)? Poss siblings: William (1647, poss m. 1676 Mary Crutchet?), Art (1649), Thomas (1652, poss m. 1702 Joan Adams? Poss d. 1715), James (1656)?]

Crediton: Jn Brownescombe marries An Slee.

@1684
5 October, Littleham: Simon, fourth child of William Branscomb of Exmouth & Mary (Crutchet - m. 1676 Littleham), baptised. [poss d. 1741? Poss siblings: William (1679), James (1681), William (bp 1682, d. 1728?), James (bp 1686), Arthur (bp 1689), Sarah (bp 1659, m. 1683?)? William senior poss d. 1728 Littleham?]

The will of Robert Brownescombe of Crediton is proved in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.

Exeter: The will of Thomas Bremblecombe alias Halse, is registered with the Principle Registry of the Bishop of Exeter.

@1685
12 May, Feniton: Sarah Branscombe, daughter of Dorothy, baptised. (IGI) [Dorothy Branscombe, daughter of weaver Osmund & Joan, married Josias Skinner in Feniton, 1609. By the time of Osmund's will, in 1614, they have at least one child, Elizabeth. Dorothy Palmer married Peter Branscombe in 1649. This may be Peter, son of Peter, grandson of Osmund & Joan, bp. 1630 Feniton? Peter's will was administered in 1671]

Reign of King Charles II ends (since 1660). James II succeeds (to 1689).

The Monmouth Rebellion. The Duke of Monmouth lands at Lyme Regis to raise the country against James II. Protestant Devonians flock to his banner.

Battle of Sedgemoor: Between forces led by the Duke of Monmouth and the army of King James. The last battle to be fought on English soil. Refugees supposed to have hidden weapons in the cellar of the church at Branscombe. (what cellar?)

Louis XIV revokes the Edict of Nantes, which guaranteed freedom of worship in France. Thousands of Huguenots flee, many of them ending up in London.

19 November, St. Gregory's, Dawlish: Nicholas, son of Nicholas Branscombe baptised. (IGI) [poss. son of Nicholas & Susan Sawden, m. 1677 - could be Nicholas who is buried in 1692? Poss siblings: Elizabeth (1679), Thomas (1681), John (1687), (Susanna/Sarah? - 1689)]

Henry Adams, pewterer, of London.(to 1732)

The will of Thomas Brownestone [Branscombe?] of Morchard Episcopi [Morchard Bishop], is proved in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.

The wills of Edward Weymouth of West Teignmouth and Elizabeth Weymouth of Marldon, are proven in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.

`It was established practice throughout England for the Assize Judges appointed by the King to visit each county in turn, twice a year, during the Lent and Summer Terms, to dispense justice in both civil and criminal matters of the more serious kind. Of the Western Circuit Judges the most notorious was "bloody" Judge George Jeffreys, who earned his unenviable sobriquet for the cruel way in which he dealt with those who took part in Monmouth's Rebellion ...'

According to Sidmouth historian & antiquarian, Peter Orlando Hutchinson, `old Michell had fifty refugees from Jeffrey's Assize at Seaside Farm in Branscombe.' [cf: 1636 John Michell of Branscombe]

Crediton: Sar Brownescombe marries Ric Parkman.

@1686
20 March, Littleham: James, fifth child of William Branscomb of Exmouth & Mary (Crutchet - m. 1676 Littleham), baptised. [poss son James bp 1711? Poss siblings: William (1679), James (1681), William (bp 1682, d. 1728?), Simon (bp 1684, d. 1741?), Arthur (bp 1689), Sarah (bp 1659, m. 1683?)? William senior poss d. 1728 Littleham?]

26 May, Dawlish: Agnes Branscombe buried. [cf: 1643, Agnes Branscombe m. Robert Tripe]

27 June, All Saints, Dorchester: William Branscome marries Ann Daley. (IGI)

12 September, Broad Clyst: An, (first child?) of John Brannscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss John, b. 1659 Woodbury, second child of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss siblings: William (1688), Samuel (1691), Sarah (1693), Philip (1694)]

Crediton: Dorothy & Christopher Brownescombe, testamentary cause. Also John Brownscombe.

Exeter, St. John: Thos Branscom marries Sus Snow. [poss Thomas, bp 1660, 7 October, St. Mary Arches, Exeter, son of Joseph Braunscom? Joseph is registered in the St. Mary Arches parish, in the 1641 Protestation returns. Apprentice of William Hoppin(g), clock maker, and mentioned in William's will of 1643. In 1646, Joseph Brownscombe, locksmith, becomes a Freeman of Exeter. In 1652, Joshua, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Olave's, followed in 1656 by a son John. In the 1660 Poll Tax, Joseph and his wife are registered at St. Olave's. In 1661, William, son of Joseph, is baptised in St. Mary Arches, and in 1662 another (or the same?) William. In 1673, Joseph, a locksmith, son of Joseph, succeeds his father as a Freeman of Exeter. In 1683, Mary, daughter of Joseph, is baptised in St. Thomas. Also cf: Branscombe, Drupe, Blackborough, Colaton Raleigh, lands & marriage settlements ... (EPNI) 96M/47/15. Also cf: 1646, 1694 for other Branscombe/Snow marriages]

@1687
10 March, Sussex County, Delaware: `The Judgment of the Inquest upon the body of James Colle late servant to Thomas Branscom being found dead was read in Court and ordered to be recorded.' [cf: 1690 Thomas elected to Pennsylvania Assembly]

17 September, Heavitree: Richard Branscomb marries Kathren Dives. [poss b. 1671, son of Richard? Poss siblings: Elizabeth (1653), John (1657), Mary (1660), James (1663), Katheren (1667), Richard (1670), Mary (1672)]

30 October, St. Gregory's, Dawlish: John, son of Nicholas Branscombe & Susan (Sawden, m. 1677 Exeter?), christened. [marries Mary, daughter of Thomas & Bessie Adams. d.6 January, 1720, Dawlish. Poss siblings: Elizabeth (1679), Thomas (1681), Nicholas (1685-1692?), (Susanna/Sarah? - 1689)]

Newton's Principia published. Marks, with the incorporation of the Royal Society, (1662) a rise in the habits of scientific investigation, especially in the fields of physics and mechanics. A growth of new intellectual interest which strongly affected, in the course of the next century, the mental life of the educated classes. It was to mix itself deeply and subtly with the economic development in the England and Scotland of scientist-inventor James Watt.

Thomas Brownscombe of Tiverton makes his will.

William Brownscombe, weaver of Crediton. (EPNI)

Crediton: Jn Brownscomb marries Jo Bunson.

@1688
31 January, Broad Clyst: William, (second child?) of John Brannscomb, baptised. (IGI) [poss John, b. 1659 Woodbury, son of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss siblings: An (1686), Samuel (1691), Sarah (1693), Philip (1694)?]

20 February, Sussex County, Pennsylvania: William Dyre makes his will, in which it is mentioned he owns four hundred acres formerly in partnership with Stephen Whittman, now bounding upon the lands of Jerimiah Scott & Thomas Branscomb, and to the southward partly upon John & William Roads, and to the eastward upon the marshes of Town Creek. [cf: 1642 Thomas Branscomb of Bishops Hull]

16 May, Exeter: Joshua Branscombe, locksmith, of Allhallows-on-the-Walls parish, leases `a plot of ground without West Gate' from the Chamber (city council?), for 99 years or three lives, in consideration of an expenditure of twenty pounds in one year on rebuilding a cottage, and an annual rent of 4s. (EPNI)

17 July: Thomas Yeangs commissioned as a waiter and searcher at Seaton, Beer and Branscombe (Exeter port).

24 July, St. James, Dukes Place, London: Margaret Branscomb, marries Thomas Langford. (IGI)

27 August, Exeter: Joshua Branscombe junior, locksmith, enters the Freedom of the City of Exeter. (Father dead?) Also Thomas Branscomb, locksmith.

`The Freemen of Exeter always constituted a substantial minority of the population of the city, large enough to be used as a good sample of the occupational structure in most periods. This is true down to the latter part of the 17th century, after which date political considerations enter more and more into the number of admissions to the freedom ... towns the size of Exeter Bristol and Norwich ... might have well over a hundred different occupations for young men to choose from in the Tudor period ... It is obviously of the highest value to genealogists when one considers the extent to which the freedom passed by succession over the centuries.' (Hoskins, "Exeter Freemen 1266-1967", Devon & Cornwall Record Society Extra Series 1, 1973, pp. vii-ix)

4 November: The Prince of Orange lands at Torbay.

Sir Walter Yonge finishes his new mansion at Escot, Talaton. [cf: 1227/1353 Richard Branscombe/1808 destroyed by fire]

`... the English pirate, naturalist and adventurer, William Dampier, with his crew, made a hurried trip to the Australian west coast seeking a safe harbour where he might careen the ship Cygnet, and between the present towns of Broome and Derby, he met Aborigines of the Bardi tribe.'

27 December, Littleham: Sarah Branscomb, of Exmouth marries Thomas (W/Fish?) of Exmouth.

`Relaxation of controls following the `revolution' of 1688 saw a flood of newspapers emerging. Most used the older popular titles - giving a plethora of Intelligence(r)s, Gazettes, Mercuries, Courants, Flying Posts, Postmans, etc., referring to the speed with which printed words were disseminated and believed. Weeklies became bi-weeklies. At last came the daily. The first, the Post Boy, lasted four days, but the 1702 Daily Courant was much longer lived.'

Civil War?

Parliament becomes supreme organ of government. (?)

Crediton: Rbt Brownscomb marries Sus Bass.

@1689
Reign of James II ends (since 1685). William III of Orange succeeds (to 1702). Also Mary II (to 1694).

1 January, Littleham: Arthur, sixth child of William Branscomb of Exmouth & Mary (Crutchet - m. 1676 Littleham), baptised. [poss d. 1751? Poss m. 1713 Elizabeth Callard? Poss siblings: William (1679), James (1681), William (bp 1682, d. 1728?), Simon (bp 1684, d. 1741?), James (bp 1686), Sarah (bp 1659, m. 1683?)? William senior poss d. 1728 Littleham?]

11 February, Walter Brounsdon of Sampford Spinney marries Elizabeth Rodd of (Wakenton?).

18 August, Dawlish: Susana, daughter of Nicholas Branscom & ? (Susanna Sawden m. 1677 Exeter?), baptised. (IGI) [m. Andrew Norton 1723? Poss siblings: Elizabeth (1679), Thomas (1681), Nicholas (1685-1692?), John (1687)]

20 August, Withycombe Raleigh: Charity, daughter of William & Jone Branscomb, christened. (IGI) [poss d. 1695, Withycombe? Poss first child of William, bp. 1662 Woodbury, poss second child of Bartholomew & Martha? Poss siblings: John (1690), William (1695/1696?), Martha (1698), Mary (1700-1701?)?]

3 September, Cheriton Fitzpaine: Catheraine Brownscomb marries Richard Mandley. (IGI)

13 October, Crediton: Anne, daughter of John and Anne Brounscume, is christened. (IGI)

War starts between England and France.

Approximate year of birth of Abraham Branscombe, son of John Branscombe, a pauper of Morchard [Bishop? - cf: 1674]. Goes up to Exeter College, Oxford, aged 18, in 1706/7. He gains his BA in 1710, is appointed rector of Eggesford, Devon, in 1723; of Chawleigh in 1732.

Crediton: poss marriage of Ann Branscombe and ?

Crediton: Agnes & William Brownscombe, testamentary cause.

Doddiscombsleigh: The will of John Branscombe is lodged with the Principle Registry of the Bishop of Exeter.

@1690
4 January, Crediton: Dorothy, daughter of Mark Brownscomb and Sarah, christened. (IGI)

18 January, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?), Ann Brownscombe is buried in woolen. Affidavit sworn by Eliza Sowden, before Mr. Trobridge. [poss Ann (Lea - m. 1655 Exeter, John)? Poss children: Hugh (1658), Joyce (1661), John (1664), Mary (1666)]

22 March, Withycombe Raleigh: John, son of William & Jone Brancomb, christened. (IGI) [poss second child of William, poss bp. 1662 Woodbury, poss second child of Bartholomew & Martha? No record so far of William & Joan's marriage. John's poss siblings: Charity (1689-1695?), William (1695/1696?), Martha (1698), Mary (1700-1701?)?]

31 March, Pennsylvania: Thomas Branscome elected to the Pennsylvania Assembly, representing "ye County of Suffex". [cf: 1687 & 1693]

21 April, Ide: Maria Branscombe marries Christopher Slut. (IGI)

Calcutta founded, by the English.

George Fox, founder of the Society of Friends (Quakers), buried at Tindale's burial-ground, Bunhill Fields, Moorgate.

`In 1690 provincial newspapers started, in a small way, with the Worcester News-Sheet, later enlarged as the Worcester Postman (1709). Variously stopped and refounded, it became Berrow's Worcester Journal in 1753, which is extant.'

John Carter is appointed waiter and searcher at Seaton, Beer and Branscombe. (£10 and £10)

??, Saint Edmund's, Exeter: John Branscom marries Anstes Squyer[?]. (IGI) [Earl Kennedy transcript says this marriage at Thorverton, or that they were of Thorverton]

St. Mary Arches, Exeter: poss marriage of Mary Branscombe?

Crediton: poss marriage of Thomas Branscombe and Grace Skinner?

@1691
1 April, Whitehall & The Hague: Royal Commission for Osmond Branscombe, gentleman, made an Adjutant in the Regiment of Foot commanded by Thomas Earle. [cf: 1610 & 1649, Osmond Branscombe, (weaver) of Feniton]

16 June, Broad Clyst: Samuell Brannscombe, (third child?) of John, baptised. (IGI) [poss John, overseer of apprentices, b. 1659 Woodbury, son of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss children: An (1686), William (1688), Sarah (1693), Philip (1694)?]

22 June, St. Edmund's, Exeter: Elizabeth Brinicom [Branscombe?] marries Thomas Hackwill. (IGI)

31 August, Exeter: Stephen Philipps, locksmith, apprentice of Joshua Branscombe, admitted to the freedom of the city of Exeter.

13 October: End of the Irish War (since 1689). `The terms of the surrender of Limerick provided for the voluntary transport of Irish soldiers to France, freedom of religious (Catholic) belief in Ireland, and an amnesty. It was ratified by the English parliament, however the predominantly Protestant Irish assembly rejected the liberal terms and enacted a harshly anti-Catholic Penal Code.'

The will of David Brownscombe, of Zeal Monachorum (nr. Morchard Bishop), is administered in the Principle Registry of the Bishop of Exeter. [cf: 1699, the will of Thomazine Brounscombe of Zeal Monachorum is administered. There is no record, so far, of David's baptism]

Edward Brownscombe of Drewsteignton makes his will.
Brampford Speke: Poss marriage of Sara Branscombe?

@1692
20 April, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?), Hugh Brownscombe is buried in woolen. Affidavit sworn by Mary Warren. [poss bp. 1658 Oakford, son of John & Ann (Lea - m. 1655 Exeter)? Poss siblings: Joyce (1661), John (1664), Mary (1666)]

12 October, Dawlish: Nicholas, son of Nicholas Branscombe, buried. [poss. bap. 1685 - mother poss. Susanna (Sawden) of Exeter]

10/25? October, Dawlish: Susanna Branscombe buried. [not daughter of Nicholas or Susanna (Sawden), his wife]

Port Royal, colonial harbor town in Jamaica, destroyed by an earthquake.


Dawlish: The Churchwarden's accounts for this year contain a lengthy rating assessment. Comparing the accounts since 1588 with a voting register for 1966, Elsa Godfrey noted some surnames persisted: [not a comprehensive list]

Baker, Beard, Bond, Brown, Clapp, Cole, Cox, , Davey, Down, Ford, Kingdon, Lambshead, Luscombe, Martin, Newcombe, Pennyman, Penniwill, Perryman, Petherick, Rowe, Shapter, Tapley, Tozer, Tucker, Underhay, Voysey, Westcott, Wills, Wise, Whidbourne, Yeo.

The same was also true of some christian names:

John, Henry, Richard, William, Nicholas, Thomas, Robert.

Some of the more unusual christian names included:

Caleb, Gavin, Giles, Redigon, Theophilus, Tristram, Orthy, Jasper, Abraham, Luke, Valentine.

As the Accounts record payments, mainly for the work done on the Church or "aboute the p'ish", female given names are not as frequent as the above, but they occur in the early rating lists:

Avis, Charity, Dorithy, Joanna.


Hockworthy: poss marriage of Elizabeth Branscombe?

Crediton: poss marriage of John Branscombe and Joan Hutchins?

Crediton: Jn Brownscomb marries Cat Chidleigh.

@1693
28 February, Sandford: Susanna Brownscombe & Joseph (Hechs/Hecks?) married.

23 April, Littleham: Sarah, seventh child of Thomas Branscomb of Exmouth & Mary (Crutchet - m. 1676 Littleham), baptised. [poss m. 1720 James Geiles? Poss siblings: William (1679), James (1681), William (bp 1682, d. 1728?), Simon (bp 1684, d. 1741?), James (bp 1686), Arthur (bp 1689)? William senior poss d. 1728 Littleham?]

25 April, Upton Hellions: Anne, daughter of William Brownscombe, is christened. (IGI)

30 June, Sussex County, Delaware: The will of Thomas Branscomb names his wife Mary and daughter Sarah. [cf: 9 December. Also cf: 1687]

24 September, Broad Clyst: Sarah Brannscombe, (fourth child?) of John, baptised. (IGI) [poss John, overseer of apprentices, b. 1659 Woodbury, son of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss children: An (1686), William (1688), Samuel (1691), Sarah (1693), Philip (1694)]

16 October, St. Petrox, Exeter: Sarah Branscom marries Roger Wannill. (IGI)

9 December, Sussex County, Delaware: Letters of Administration granted to Mary Branscomb. [cf: 30 June]

24 December, Crediton: Martha, daughter of Simon Branscombe, christened. (IGI)

`Land tax was first introduced in order to contribute towards the financing of the prolonged and increasingly costly war with France, which had begun in 1689. An Act of 1693 (4 William & Mary c.1) required counties to pay tax under a quota system, and this national tax was voted annually by Parliament from 1693 to 1798, the rate varying between 1s. and 4s. in the pound, until fixed at 4s. in 1772. Local assessors, appointed by tax commissioners for each county and borough, returned assessments based on valuations of land, personal estate, the salaries or profits of public office, tithes, buildings, goods and merchandise. In practice, it soon proved impossible to collect taxes on personal incomes and the burden of the tax fell increasingly on land. Furthermore, although reassessments were supposed to take place, and did to some extent in isolated cases, after 1697 it was the assessments of 1693 which for all practical purposes became the basis on which the land tax was raised.'

The will of Hugh Brownscombe of Oakford is proved before the Court of the Archdeaconry of Barnstaple.

Littleham: Poss marriage of spinster Sara Branscombe and Roger (Wannell?).

@1694
9 February, Braughing, Herts: The will of Henry Raye mentions a messuage at Great Hull, Braughing, occupied by carpenter Henry Branscombe. The will is proved in the Middlesex Archdeaconry on 3 May this year.

26 February, Sussex County, Delaware: [the will of?] Elizabeth Rhoades, widow, names Sarah Branscomb, daughter of Thomas & Elizabeth, both deceased. [cf: 1693]

4 March, Broad Clyst: Philip, son of John Branscombe, is baptised. (IGI) [poss fifth child of John, overseer of apprentices, b. 1659 Woodbury, son of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss other children: An (1686), William (1688), Samuel (1691), Sarah (1693)?]

Reign of Queen Mary II ends (since 1689).

Bank of England founded as a joint-stock company.

The French attack Ferryland, Newfoundland, using five men-of-war. They are repulsed by the land forts there, and by the efforts of Captain Holman, in his ship the William and Mary.

The will of Andrew Brownscombe of Upton Hellings (Hellions) is administered in the Archdeaconry, Exeter.
[cf: 1612,1619,1620 - wills of Mark Branscombe (mason?) of Upton Hellions. A Mark Brounscombe is registered in Upton Hellions with Andrew and John Brownscombe, in the 1641 Protestation]

Poss marriage of Philip Branscombe of/at Woodbury, to (Jemimah? Snow?). [cf: 1646, 1686 for other Branscombe/Snow marriages]

@1695
Julian, wife of Joshua Branscombe senior, locksmith of Exeter. (EPNI)

4/5 March, Exeter: Lease and Releasing agreement between Peter Stephens, fuller of Exeter, Joshua Branscombe the Elder, locksmith, and Edward Bampfield of Exeter, grocer. The agreement concerns the garden plot referred to in the original lease of 4 June, 1659.

`... bounded on the east with a little lane leading to Arch Lane, on the west with a garden in tenure of Roger Pyne, on the north with a garden in tenure of said Joshua Branscombe, which said garden hereby granted was late in tenure of Joseph Hussey, goldsmith, and contains in length 45 feet and in breadth 44 feet, and was formerly part of the said garden which lies on the south, but is now divided by a brick wall belonging to the said Edward Bampfield, together with liberty for said Edward Bampfield to go through the shop of Joshua Branscombe's dwelling house (being lately a Gate) into the said little lane leading from Arch Lane into the said garden, hereby granted.' [cf: 1718 St. Edmund's, Eleanor Pyne m. Joshua Branscombe]

22 March, Woodbury: John Brownscome is an Overseer of Apprentices.

26 March, Withycombe Raleigh: William, son of William Branscombe & Joan, baptised. [poss duplication of William, bp. 1696? poss siblings: Charity (1689-1695?), John (1690), Martha (1698), Mary (1700-1701?)?]

18 April, Crediton: Dorothy Brownscombe marries George Levet. (IGI)

24 June, Woodbury: John Braunscombe is an Overseer of Apprentices.

13 July, Woodbury: John Braunscombe is an Overseer of Apprentices.

14 September, Withycombe Raleigh: Charity, daughter of William Branscombe, buried. [poss bp. 1689, daughter of William & Joan?]

John Brownscome, an overseer of apprentices, Woodbury. (EBMI) [poss bp. 1659 Woodbury, second child of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss brother of Philip, also an overseer of apprentices in Woodbury?]

Hertfordshire: `If there was an election pending, and the candidates were his own friends, [James Forester] would be here, there and everywhere, not bribing and corrupting, but peacefully persuading thirsty souls of the potency of the liquid golden maxim In vino veritas: `Spent at Hide's at Walkern getting voices for Mr. Freman and Mr. Halsey, 15s 6d ... spent on Cottered freeholders going to and at Hertford, £2 14s 8d.' The money spent on liquor was not in vain, Freman and Halsey were returned by a thumping majority on 26th September.

`In 1695 was born the Stamford Mercury, which continued in production, and is still running as the Lincoln, Rutland and Stamford Mercury, and proudly billed as "Britain's Oldest Newspaper." The Edinburgh Gazette (1699) runs it close.'

Gregory King makes a careful estimate of the population of England and Wales, and concludes it totals 5½ million. The first official census in 1801 will give a figure of 9.3 million.

Crediton: Dor Brownscomb marries Geo Leuet.

@1696
21 March, Thorverton, Devon: Judith, daughter of Thomas Branscombe, christened.(IGI) [cf: 1673 John Branscombe of Thorverton pays poor rates. Also cf: 1697 Thorverton - Mary, daughter of John Branscombe, baptised]

26 March, Withycombe Raleigh: William, son of William & Joan Branscombe, baptised. (IGI) [poss duplication of William, bp. 1695?]

Nicholas Branscombe holds the estate of Shutterton [Cofton], in Dawlish parish. [mariner - master of the "Susan & Mary". poss father of Thomas (1681), Nicholas (1685), John (1687), Susanna (1689) - poss m. 1677 Susanna Sawden - cf: 1724 will for description of land holdings]


28 September, Eastwood, Alphington: The will of Richard Hayne, yeoman, includes his nephew, Thomas Branscombe, and Thomas' children, Alexander & Johane. The will is proved in Exeter, 16 October, and has a value of £623.15.0.

`My father's grave in Alphington

To the Poor, £30 fish stock

Brother Wm Hayne, decd., and his daughters Eliz & Mary

Nephew Thomas Branscombe & his children Alexander & Johane ...'

Proved in A of Exon, 16 October 1696, by John the nephew and by the brother and exor. Inventory by Joseph Stone of Alphington and Rowland Pope of the same, 13 October 1696. £623-15-00.


`In 1696, Edward Lloyd started Lloyd's News, which failed, but was revived as Lloyd's List, (1726), specialising in news of ships, voyages and merchant ventures.'

Poss marriage of Philip Branscombe of Woodbury and (Henrietta?) Nicholls.

@1697
8 July, St. Dunstan, Stepney: James Branscome of Upper Wapping, mariner, marries Sarah Martin, spinster. [cf: 1699 for son John, 1705 for James, 1707 for William. James senior may have been a member of the Liveried Company of Weavers, in 1713. His son William (bp. 1707 St. Dunstan, Stepney) may have married in 1734, Jane Robinson, at St. Mary Magdalene, Old Fish Street. Their daughter Sarah was baptised in 1738 at St. Andrew's Holborn. According to the index held at GLRO, this is the only Branscombe marriage in this church between 1568-1639 & between 1697-1719. IGI notes James is a `relative of Joseph S Peery']

7 November, Withycombe Raleigh: Bartholomew Branscomb buried. [poss husband of Martha or son of Bartholomew & Martha, b. 1665? Poss other children/siblings: John (1661 - Sowton), William (1662 - Woodbury), Martha (1669), Jonathan (1673), all bp. Withycombe Raleigh]

24 November, Honiton on Otter: Susanah Branscomb, marries William Salter. (IGI)

Chinese occupy Outer Mongolia.

John Aubrey dies (since 1629).

Phillip Bauncombe, an overseer of apprentices, Woodbury. [also 1702? Poss bp. 1664 Woodbury, fourth child of John & Grace (Clapp - m. 1656 Woodbury)? Poss father of John (1700), Phil (1705), Hannah (1706)?]

The will of John Branscombe of Exeter is lodged in the Archdeaconry Court of Exeter.

??, Thorverton: Mary Branscombe, daughter of John, baptised. (IGI)
[cf: 1673 John Branscombe of Thorverton pays poor rates. Also cf: 1696 Thorverton - Judith, daughter of Thomas Branscombe, christened]

@1698
5 January, Withycombe Raleigh: Martha, daughter of William & Joan Branscomb, baptised. (IGI) [poss siblings: Charity (1689-1695?), John (1690), William (1695/1696?), Mary (1700-1701?)? Martha may m.(1717/1718?), Withycombe Raleigh, Stephen Chard?]

9 April, Upton Hellions: Dorothy, daughter of William Brownscombe, christened. (IGI)

22 December, Sandford: Robert Brownscomb & Joan Carpenter marry. [Robert probably dies in Sandford, 1737. He & Joan probably baptise the following children: Joan & Mary (1700), Elizabeth (1704, d. 1706), Elizabeth (1709). Mary marries John Southcott in Sandford, 1726, and dies 1778. For poss ancestors of Robert in Sandford cf: 1608 & 1665]

`The first rock, or wave-swept, lighthouse is usually accepted as being the Eddystone light of 1698.'

The London Workhouse opens, Bishopsgate.

The will of John Brannscombe of Broad Clyst is administered, in the Archdeaconry of Exeter. [poss m. 1656 Woodbury, Grace Clapp. Poss children: Grace (1657), John (1659), William (1661), Philip (1664), Samuel (1665), Samuel (1670)? Or poss son John bp. 1659 Woodbury? Poss children: Ann (1686), William (1688), Samuel (1691) & Sarah (1693), Philip (1694), all bp. Broad Clyst]

Private lotteries are banned in England.

A William Branscombe of Topsham is said to have flourished in the late 1600s as a ship's captain and owner who was in the Newfoundland fishing trade.

@1699
20 July, St. Dunstan's, Stepney: John, son of James Branscome of Upper Wapping, mariner & of Sarah (Martin - m. 1697), baptised. [cf: 1705 for brother James & 1707 for William]

`A petition to the House of Commons against the threatened repeal of the Lace Duties shows that there were over 4700 people employed in lace-making in Devon. The largest centres were Honiton, (1341) and Ottery St. Mary.(814) Colyton, Seaton, Beer, Sidbury and Sidmouth each had more than 300 lace-workers. The hill-parishes such as Lupitt and Upottery were also important centres.'

Poor Rate: In St. Olave parish, Exeter, Joshua Branscombe, or the occupiers of his estate, are assessed at 2d.

In Allhallowes-Upon-the-Wall parish, the occupiers of Joshua Branscombe's house are assessed at one half pence. [The overseer in St. Mary Steps parish is Richard Mapowder - cf: 1620, Branscombe of Mortham]

`During his second visit to the west coast [of Australia] ... Dampier fitted out Aborigines in the cast-off remnants of European clothing, hoping to induce them to carry water from the wells to the ship's boat.

We brought these our new servants to the wells, and put a barrel on each of their shoulders for them to carry to the canoe. But all the signs we could make were to no purpose, for they stood like statues, without motion ... and they very fairly put the clothes off again and laid them down, as if clothes were only to work in.

The will of Thomazine Brounscombe/Mare, of Zeal Monachorum (nr. Morchard Bishop), is administered in the consistory court of the Bishop of Exeter. [cf: 1640 Thomazine Branscombe, 1717 John Branscombe m. Ann Mare, 1790 John Branscombe m. Agnes Mare. Also cf: 1691, the will of David Brownscombe, of Zeal Monachorum, is administered]

`As cloth market and mercantile port, [Exeter] had three rich centuries - by the end of the seventeenth, Celia Fiennes, that most hard-headed sightseer, reported: `It turns the most money in a week of anything in England.''


© 1996-2006 Ronald Branscombe

Email: genealogy (at) branscombe (dot) net

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