BRANSCOMBE TIMELINES

The Eighteenth Century

The header for each year is preceded with an @ sign to facilitate searching


 

 

@1700

14 February, St.Mary Arches, Exeter: Thomas Braunscombe marries Joan Bawden. (IGI) [Bowden?]

 

15 July, Withycombe Raleigh: Mary, daughter of William & Jone Brancsomb, baptised. [poss d.1701? Poss fifth & last child of William & Joan ? No marriage date yet, but William poss bp.1662 Woodbury? Poss siblings: Charity (1689-1695?), John (1690), William (1695/1696?), Martha (1698)? William senior poss d.1716 & Joan 1736?]

 

3 September, Sandford: Joan, first child of Robert Brownscomb & Joan (Carpenter - m.1698), baptised. [siblings Mary Dec 1700, Elizabeth 1704-1706, Elizabeth 1709]

 

7 September: Complaint regarding presence of Captain Branscomb's ship in St Johns harbour, Newfoundland. [cf: 1701]

 

27 September, Clyst St.George: Hannah Branscombe of Woodbury marries Jacob Dolling of East Budleigh.[1] [cf:Dollings of Dawlish 1841. Also, Hannah bp.1706 Woodbury, daughter of Phil Branscombe, overseer of apprentices 1702. Is it possible that this is the widow of John bp.1659 Woodbury, second child of John & Grace (Clapp - m.1656 Woodbury), poss will administered 1698 Broad Clyst? If so they had at least five children, all bp. Broad Clyst: An (1686), William (1688), Samuel (1691), Sarah (1693), Philip (1694)]

 

17 October, St.Sidwell's, Exeter: Jone Branscomb marries Robert Ridler. (IGI)

 

??, Woodbury: John Branscombe, son of Philip, christened. (IGI) [poss first child of Philip, overseer of apprentices, poss bp.1664 Woodbury, fourth child of John & Grace (Clapp - m.1656 Woodbury)? Poss siblings: Philip (1705), Hannah (1706). John junior poss m.1720 Woodbury, Mrs Mary Adams?]

 

16 December, Sandford: Mary [S?], second child of Robert Brownscombe & Joan (Carpenter - m.1698), baptised. [siblings Joan Sept 1700, Elizabeth 1704-1706, Elizabeth 1709. Mary married 1726 (John Southcott), died 1778. Robert prob d.1737 Sandford]

 

Captain Branscombe mentioned in a letter to the Admiralty Office from J.of St.Johns, Newfoundland. The letter is a list of complaints against Captain William Lilburne, Captain William, Commander of H.M. forces in Newfoundland. Included is a complaint that a local fishing vessel was ejected from the harbor to make room for Captain Branscombe's ship, on 7 September, 1700. (cf:1702)

 

[A John Branscombe of Topsham, ship's captain in the Newfoundland trade, is flourishing at this time. The Branscombes in the Newfoundland trade are said to mainly sail from Topsham, but sometines also Beer][2]

 

`England and Wales at the beginning of the eighteenth century were inhabited by about 5½ million people - far fewer than the population of present day London ... Roughly a third of the total population lived in south-eastern England ... It was estimated that in many towns in the early eighteenth century half the children born died before they were five. Consequently the total population increased only slowly - especially up to about 1750 ... smallpox, dysentry, typhus and consumption were widespread ... in the period 1720-50 cheap gin was consumed in great quantities, especially in the London area. However in 1751 Parliament greatly increased the tax on spirits, and strictly controlled their sale by distillers and shopkeepers ... Queen Anne (1702-14) had seventeen children, yet none reached maturity. However the death rate fell in the second half of the eighteenth century. Consequently the population of England and Wales reached 9 million by 1801.'[3]

 

Upton Hellions: poss year of birth of Ann Branscombe, who m. 1721, Edward Haydon?

 

`Between 1697 and 1815 there are, for Britain, more years of war than of peace.'

 

`By the early 1700's there were no less than 26 coffee-houses, and 30 taverns, where financiers of various kinds met, mostly situated around 'londonChange Alley, at the back of the Royal Exchange, between londonCornhill and londonThreadneedle Street.'

 

`Nothing today could look less like an important harbour than the mouth of the , for its tiny stream struggles with difficulty between cliff and shingle, to reach the sea. Yet as recently as monarchsWilliam III's reign [1689-1702], ships traded here from distant countries. And though now the little bay is silted up, it is admirably sheltered from rough weather...it is easy to believe that prehistoric shipping would have found it a commodious harbour.' [4]

 

`Until the 1700's, much of the paper used in Britain is imported from the Continent.'[5]

 

St.Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: poss marriage of Joan Branscombe? [6]

 

@1701

2 March, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Bartholomew Brunscombe baptised, son of Bartholomew & Agnes.[7] [Bartholomew m.1701 Oakford, Agnes Lake. Prob siblings: James (1703), Andrew (1707)]

 

24 April, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Bartholomew Brunscombe marries Agnes Lake.[8] [prob children: Bartholomew (1701), James (1703), Andrew (1707). The old calendar makes it look as if their first child was born out of wedlock!]

 

10 November, Withycombe Raleigh: Mary Branscom, daughter of William, buried.[9] [Mary poss bp.1700?, poss fifth & last child of William & Joan?]

 

Knowstone: Thomas Brownscombe marries Elizabeth (Tar?) and Agnes Brownscombe marries ? [10]

 

Dawlish: poss marriage of Thomas Branscombe and Joan (Bowden?).[11]

 

@1702

6 March, Woodbury: Phillip Braunscombe is an Overseer of Apprentices. [12]

 

5 April, Littleham: Thomas Branscom marries Joan Adames of Exmouth.[13] [poss. son of Nicholas & Susanna, bp.1681 Dawlish? If so, brother John marries Mary, daughter of Thomas & Bessie Adams. OR poss second child of Thomas Branscombe & Susanna (Elson - m.1646 Littleham)? Poss d.1715?]

 

29 April, Talaton: Robert Branscombe marries ayres, Agnes Ayres. (IGI) [cf:1717 Talaton, John Branscomb m. Anne Mare]

 

19 May, Broadhempston, Devon: Philip Pearse (b.1678?) son of Philip, marries Purthesay Avery. They have at least three children: Philip (buried 1711), Philip (bapt. 1713), Thomas (bapt. 1717)[14]

 

22 July, Crediton: Ann Brownscomb marries Thomas Jacob. (IGI)

 

Reign of King William III of Orange ends (since 1689). monarchsAnne succeeds (to 1714).

 

Captain Nicholas Branscombe, Shipmaster, given permission by the King to embark for Newfoundland, despite an embargo, on condition of being ready within a month. Nicholas is the Master of a 60-tun vessel, the shipsSusan & Mary, carrying 12 seamen and 10 landsmen. The fortifications being built in Newfoundland are almost complete. A long list of ships, perhaps including the Susan & Mary, are given permission to sail against the embargo, providing they carry a minimum cargo of supplies for this.

 

There is a reference to a ship called the Susan & Mary being taken as a prize by a Captain Norriss, Captain in 1703.

 

Woodbury Phillip Braunscombe an overseer of apprentices. (EBMI) [poss bp.1664 Woodbury, fourth child of John & Grace (Clapp - m.1656 Woodbury)? Poss children: John (1700), Philip (1705), Hannah (1706). John junior poss m.1720 Woodbury, Mrs Mary Adams?]

 

Grand Junction Canal extended to londonPaddington.

 

@1703

14 April, North Molton: Philip Braunscombe marries Alice Okeham. (IGI) [there appear to be no baptisms for North Molton in the IGI, so this parish may be worth checking, as there are two later marriages here, both of which could be descendents of Philip & Alice: Agnes m.1758 Jonathan Pasmore, Betty m.1790 Thomas Dinner]

 

22 April, Topsham: Martha Branscome marries Renolds, Joseph Renolds. (IGI)

 

13 July, Newton St.Cyres: Mark Branscombe marries helmore, Hanna Helmore. (IGI) [cf:1710 Mark Branscombe of Thorverton makes his will. Also cf:1740, Martha Brownscombe, daughter of Mark, mason of Thorverton. Mark Brownscombe's will administered in 1763]

 

9 November, Plymouth St Andrew: George, son of George Branscum senior, baptised.[15]

 

23 November: Marriage allegation between Edward Edwards of Washford Pine, cooper, and Sarah Philp of Morchard Bishop, spinster. Bound by Peter Crapp of Kenton, (master/mariner?)

 

23 November: Marriage allegation between Peter Crapp and Elizabeth Branscombe of Dawlish, spinster. Bound by William Sp(ring?) of Topsham, (master/mariner?), and William Barrett of (eadam/cadam?), (master/mariner?). [16]

 

23 November, Highweek: Elizabeth Branchcumb marries Peter Crapp. (IGI) [poss Elizabeth, bp. 16 November 1679, St.Gregory's, Dawlish, daughter of Nickolas Branscame. Poss siblings: Thomas (1681), Nicholas (1685-1692?), John (1687), (Susanna/Sarah? - 1689). Also cf:1656, Clapp/Branscombe]

 

3 December: Marriage allegations between Thomas Leigh of Dartmouth and Honor Hayman of same. Bound by Daniel Downe of Topsham, (master/mariner?). [17][cf:1770 bp of Honor Leigh, future wife of William Branscombe]

 

17 December, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?) James Brunscombe baptised, son of Bartholomew & Agnes.[1] [Bartholomew m.1701 Oakford, Agnes Lake. Prob siblings Bartholomew (1701), Andrew (1707)]

 

Thomas Branscombe of St.Thomas's, Exeter, makes his will.[19] [poss. son of Nicholas & Susanna, bp.1681 Dawlish? m.1702 to Joan Adams?]

 

Foundation of St.Petersburg, capital of the Russian empire.

 

A great storm hits Britain... possibly a tornado. Daniel says up to 8000 people died.

 

Eddystone lighthouse destroyed, with its designer inside.

 

Dawlish: Thomas Tripe rents the Dawlish Fishery, let by the Dean & Chapter of Exeter, for the antient [?] rent of £2.13.4d with a covenant to review for a further five years if he thinks fit.[20] [cf: typed ms. by P.R. Whiteaway, The History of Rixdale Farm, Dawlish and the Tripe Family, WCSL Exeter]

 

Dawlish: poss marriage of Elizabeth Branscombe? [21]

 

Littleham: poss marriage of Jane Branscombe and Thomas Hooper? [22]

 

@1704

5 March, Feniton: Peter Branscomb, son of Peter, baptised. (IGI) [Peter senior poss bp.1659, son of Peter & Dorothy (Palmer - m.1649 Feniton)? cf:1707 for poss brother Thomas & 1724 for reference to Peter, churchwarden of Feniton]

 

27 March, Sandford: Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Brownscombe & Joan (Carpenter - m.1698), baptised. [siblings Joan Sept 1700, Mary Dec 1700, Elizabeth 1709. Poss d.1706, as Robert & Joan christen another daughter Elizabeth in 1709]

 

1 June, Kenton: Timothy, son of sailor John Pearce & Jane, baptised.[23]

 

England takes Gibralter from Spain.[24]

 

`The politico-literary magazine was born in 1704, with defoe, Daniel magazines & newspapersDefoe's Review, followed by magazines & newspapersSteele's Tatler (1709). magazines & newspapersAddison and Steele's Spectator (1711) and magazines & newspapersDefoe's Mercurius Politicus. They were opposed by the Tory magazines & newspapersSwift's Examiner (1710) dominated by Swift.'[25]

 

@1705

12 March, Bishopsteignton: Susanna, daughter of mariner Thomas Branscombe & Joan, of Coombe [Combeinteignhead?], baptised. [cf:1707] [poss. son of Nicholas & Susanna, bp.1681 Dawlish? m.1702 to Joan Adams of Exmouth?]

 

26 April, Knowstone: The will of ? Brownscombe is proved in the Court of the Archdeaconry of Barnstaple.[26]

 

5 July: Marriage allegations between Rich Williams of Crediton, carpenter, and Sarah Brounscombe of same, spinster. [27]

 

5 July, St.David's, Exeter: Sarah Branscombe marries Ric Williams. [28]

 

7 July, Woodbury: Philip Brannscomb, son of Phil, baptised. (IGI) [poss second child of Philip, overseer of apprentices, poss bp.1664 Woodbury, fourth child of John & Grace (Clapp - m.1656 Woodbury)? Poss siblings: John (1700), Hannah (1706). John junior poss m.1720 Woodbury, Mrs Mary Adams?]

 

1 August: Elizabeth Michell, only daughter and heir of Benjamin Michell of Seaside, Branscombe, is born. Married 1726 John Heard of Bridgwater, mother of Elizabeth, b.1726/7 and m.1747 to James Branscomb of Exmouth.[1]

 

16 August, St.Dunstan's, Stepney: James, son of James, mariner of Upper Wapping & Sarah (Martin - m.1697 Stepney) Branscome, baptised.[30] [cf:1699 for brother John & 1707 for brother William]

 

21 August, Sussex County, Delaware: Sarah Branscomb witnesses the marriage of George Ely & Jane Pettitt.[31] [cf:1694]

 

Thomas Newcomen [b.Dartmouth, 1663], inventor of the first effective steam pump (called an atmospheric engine), marries Hannah Waymouth, daughter of a Malborough farmer.[32]

 

Littleham: There is a gap in the registers from 1705-1743.[33]

 

Crediton: Jas Brownscomb marries Gra Mathews. [34]

 

@1706

1 March, oodbury: Hannah Brannscombe born to Phil Brannscombe. (IGI) [poss third and last child of Philip, overseer of apprentices, poss bp.1664 Woodbury, fourth child of John & Grace (Clapp - m.1656 Woodbury)? Poss siblings: John (1700), Philip (1705). Hannah poss mother of John Taylor Branscombe bp.1731 Woodbury?]

 

4 September, andford: Elizabeth Brownscombe, buried. [poss bp.1704, daughter of Robert Brownscombe & Joan (Carpenter - m.1698)? They name a second daughter Elizabeth, in 1709]

 

@1707

4 March, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Andrew Brunscombe baptised, son of Bartholomew & Agnes.[35] [Bartholomew m. 1701 Oakford, Agnes Lake. Prob siblings: Bartholomew (1701), James (1703). Andrew poss m. 1752 Exeter, Catherine Cooke/Grinning?]

 

11 March: Abraham Branscombe, son of John Branscombe, a pauper of Morchard [Bishop?] goes up to Exeter College, Oxford, aged 18. He gains his B.A. in 1710, is appointed rector of Eggesford, Devon, in 1723; of Chawleigh in 1732.[36] [poss m.1728 Wembworthy?]

 

21 March, St.Dunstan's, Stepney: William, son of mariner James Branscum of Upper Wapping and Sarah (Martin - m.1697), baptised.[37] [cf:1699 for brother John & 1705 for brother James. William poss m.1734 St.Mary Magdalene, Old Fish Street? James senior may be the member of the Liveried Company of Weavers mentioned in 1713. There are no Branscombe baptisms indexed between 1745-1816, in this parish]

 

1 June, Kenton: Mary, daughter of John Pierce [Pearce], sailor, and Jane, baptised.[38]

 

15 September, Feniton: Thomas Branscomb, son of Peter, baptised. (IGI) [Peter senior poss bp.1659, son of Peter & Dorothy (Palmer - m.1649 Feniton)? cf:1704 brother Peter bp. Feniton & 1724 - Peter is churchwarden]

 

28 September, St.Edmund's, Exeter: Mary, daughter of George Branscombe, baptised. (IGI)

 

Withycombe Raleigh: Jno Raymond esq., Overseer of the parish, authorises payment to Joan Branscomb.[39] [poss Joan, wife of William - d.1716? Poor relief?]

 

United Kingdom formed, when Scottish parliament is persuaded to merge with the england:union;English parliament.

 

Fielding born; novelist, playwright, magistrate and founder of the Bow Street Runners. (d.1754)

 

The will of Thomas Branscombe [mariner?] of Teignton Episcopi [ishopsteignton], is proved in the exeterConsistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.[40] [Thomas of Coombe? (Combeinteignhead?) poss son of Nicholas & Susanna, bp.1681 Dawlish? m.1702 to Joan Adams of Exmouth? Father of Susanna, bp.1705 Bishopsteignton? Poss brother of John Branscombe (1687 - 1720) who married Mary Adams, daughter of Thomas & Bessie? cf:1763 the will of Thomas Branscombe of Bishopsteignton, proved]

 

@1708

19 April: Ford, locksmith, apprentice of Joshua Branscombe, is admitted to the freedom of the city of Exeter.

 

17 November, St.Petrock's, Exeter: James Brannscombe marries Magdalen Hennocks. (IGI) [poss James bp 1686 Littleham, son of William & Mary (Crutchet - m.1676 Littleham)? Summers documents say this bride is Magdalene Hancock and the church is St.Peter's. cf:1713 or 1718 - son Thomas baptised in Withycombe Raleigh. Poss sibling James (bp.1711 Littleham). Poss Magdalen remarries in Ilsington 1716?]

 

The will of Samuel Waymouth of Paynton is proved in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.[41]

 

Sardinia (to 1714), and Minorca (to 1783) become British bases.[42]

 

Wren'sSt.Paul's Cathedral, begun in 1675, is finished, at a cost of more than £700, 000.

 

Knowstone: Hugh Brownscombe marries Joan Ridler, Margery Brownscombe marries ? [43]

 

Rose Ash: (Tomsin?) Branscomb marries (Lewis Baker?).[44]

 

Petty Harbour, Newfoundland: William Blescom is registered in the census, with his wife and one child.

 

At St.John's, John Branscome is registered in a census as the master of the Exon of Topsham, bound for `Porto' with 300 quintals of fish and 3 tunns of train oil. His ship is 180 tuns burthen, with 26 men, 14 guns, 3 boats kept.[45]

 

@1709

22 May, Sandford: Elizabeth Branscomb, daughter of Robert Brownscomb & Joan (Carpenter - m.1698), baptised. [poss second daughter with this name, as the first, bp.1704, may have died in 1706. Other siblings: Mary & Joan (1700). Robert may have died in 1737]

 

August: William Branscomb, later to become a sea captain of Maine & New Hampshire, is born. [m.1732 Elizabeth White? And/or (date unknown) Prudence Page? d.16 May 1788, Hampton N.H. aged 78 years and 9 months.[46] Poss related to Charles & Joseph Branscomb, also of N.H. around the same time. Also poss Arthur Branscomb, who owned land in Durham & Newmarket, N.H.?]

 

Abraham Darby uses coke to smelt iron.[47] [a key pre-requisite of the Industrial Revolution]

 

The will of Edward Waymouth of West  Teignmouth proved in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.[48]

 

Drewsteignton: Edward Brounscombe marries An Small.[49]

 

@1710

7 May, Dawlish: Gavin Painter dies. [b.1657?] [cf:1627]

 

Here lyeth ye Body of Mr
Gawyn Painter Sen
r of this pish
who died ye 7th day of May 1710 in ye
53D YEAR OF HIS AGE

 

 

Binford, locksmith, apprentice of Joshua Branscombe, becomes a Freeman of the city of Exeter.

 

Branscombe of Thorverton [mason?] makes his will.[50] [cf:1703, Newton St.Cyres;, Mark Branscombe marries helmore, Hanna Helmore. Also cf:1740, Martha Brownscombe, daughter of Mark, mason of Thorverton. Mark Brownscombe's will administered in 1763]

 

Abraham Branscombe, son of John Branscombe, a pauper of Morchard [Bishop?], gains his B.A. He went up to Exeter College, Oxford, aged 18, in 1706/7. He is appointed rector of Eggesford, Devon, in 1723; of Chawleigh in 1732.[51]

 

Britain's britainpopulation set to double by 1810.

 

Charles; Pearse, tailor, apprentice of Pearse, tailor, made a freeman of Dartmouth.[52]

 

Knowstone: John Brownscombe marries Mary Neckells.[53]

 

@1711

20 January, Dawlish: Nicholas Branscomb buried? [unclear - not N.B. mariner cf:1724][54]

 

6 July: Marriage allegation between John Salter of Budleigh, tanner, and Ann Branscombe of Woodberry, spinster. Bound by Georg(ina?) Beard(on?) of Woolborough, clothier. [55][poss An bp,1686, 12 September, Broad Clyst, (first child?) of John Brannscombe. John poss b.1659 Woodbury, second child of John & Grace (Clapp - m.1656 Woodbury)? Poss siblings for An: William (1688), Samuel (1691), Sarah (1693), Philip (1694)]

 

20 September, Dawlish: Nicholas Branscombe of Bishopsteigton buried.[1] [poss bp.1685 son of Nicholas?]

 

15 November, Littleham: James Branscombe, son of James, baptised.[57] [poss James & Magdalen (Hennocks - m.1708 Exeter)? Poss sibling: Thomas (1718 Withycombe)? OR poss son of James bp 1686, and grandson of William Branscombe of Exmouth & Mary (Crutchet - m.1676 Littleham)?]

 

William, weaver of Crediton; Brownescombe, serge-weaver of Veny Tedborne, Crediton, father of James. (EPNI)

 

Deborah Branscomb of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, mentioned in a deposition concerning the parents of Davis [her husband?], in Swansea, South Wales.[58]

 

Addison on Britain's increased trade at the expense of France and Holland, as the British Empire began to expand, particularly in North America and the West Indies:

 

`Our ships are laden with the harvest of every climate; our tables are stored with spices and oils and wines; our rooms are filled with pyramids of china and adorned with workmanship of Japan; our morning draught comes to us from the remotest corners of the earth; we repair our bodies by the drugs of America and repose ourselves under Indian canopies. The vineyards of France are our gardens, the Spice Islands our hot beds; the Persians are our weavers and the Chinese our potters ... our English merchants convert the tin of the country into gold and exchange wool for rubies. The Mahometans are clothed in our British manufactures, and the inhabitants of the frozen zone are warmed with the fleeces of our sheep.'[59]

 

The rate for postal delivery in England is set at a minimum of 3d (the price of a good meal at a respectable inn or eating-house) for the shortest journey. `Only London had a penny post service until a change in the regulations permitted other cities to emulate it after 1765. Speeds were laid down according to formulae calculated under Charles II. The administration of the service was marred by private profiteering and political corruption. Postmasters had been given a monolpoly of `posting' travellers in 1660 and did their best to exclude competitors. Strictly speaking it was illegal for one not of their number to hire out a horse with a guide. So far as the mail itself was concerned, postmasters were entitled to charge (at their own rates) for local delivery of letters beyond the network provided by the Post Office, until an important court case in 1772 found these exactions unjustified by law. The mail was notoriously open to inspection for reasons of State. These included party politics as well as national security. The men involved served every government with impartial, patriotic cynicism ... the post was traditionally carried by post-boys riding in all weathers and risking many hazards, both natural and man-made ... The American Quaker John Woolman, visiting England in 1772, was so shocked by the cruelty which the postal system inflicted on boys and horses alike, that he advised his correspondents at home not to write to England by means of the public post except in dire necessity.'[60]

 

Invention of the Newcomen Steam Pump, or "atmospheric steam engine".[61]

 

@1712

6 February: Marriage allegations between Philip Furse of Spreyton and Mary (Batcliffe?) of Cheriton, spinster. Bound by Simon Branscombe of Littleham, (captain/nautain?) and Thomas Bowell of (eadem?), (nautain?). [62]

 

11 March: Marriage allegations between Simon Branscombe (above) and Elizabeth Weekes of Littleham, spinster. Bound by Moses Webber of Luppitt, agr, and John Chaplin of Exeter, (Sutorem?). [63]

 

John Brownscombe, serge-weaver of Veny Tedbourne, Crediton. (EPNI)

 

6 May: Marriage allegation between Mathew Hudson of Topsham, (nautain?) & Mary Branscombe of St Thomas, widow. Bound by George Vicary of Broadclyst (agr?) and Jacob Boyle of Shobrooke, yeoman. [64]

 

8 May, St.Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Mary Branscomb marries Matthew Hudson. (IGI) [cf:1820]

 

21 July: Marriage allegations between Thomas Pooke of Knowstone, agr, and Mary Delbridge of same, spinster. Bound by William Brannscombe of Woodbury, yeoman, and Philipp Brannscombe of Clyst St George, yeoman. [65]

 

24 July: Marriage allegations between William Branscombe (above) and Elizabeth Hart of Colyton Raleigh, spinster. Bound by John Page of Woodbury, miller, and William Cornish of (endem/eadem?), cordwainer. [66]

 

24 July, St.Peter's, Exeter: William Branscombe marries Elizabeth Hart. (IGI) [poss William bp 1682 Littleham, son of William & Mary (Crutchet- m.1676 Littleham)? William poss d.1728? cf:1715 Branscombe/Hart marriage settlements since 1650]

 

`Newspapers have always been looked upon with suspicion by governments and an attempt at control and at the same time raise money was made in 1712, by the Stamp Tax. The official minute stated there were 44, 000 newspapers published weekly - the total combined circulation, not titles - and the tax imposed was a halfpenny on a half sheet or less, and a penny up to a full (folded) sheet. The result was that the `quality' papers, like the Spectator had to close down, but the scandal sheets were buoyant enough to survive.'[67]

 

Exeter, St Thomas: My Branscomb marries Mat Hudson. [68]

 

@1713

March: John Branscombe arrives in New England from Exeter, aboard the Leghorn Marchant. He may not have been an immigrant, as he is mentioned in the records as a “shipper” for John Pym's emigration from Exeter to New England on the Leghorn Marchant. [69]

 

11 March, Littleham: Simon Branscombe marries spinster Elizabeth Weekes. Both of this parish.[70] [cf:1712, 11 March for allegations]

 

16 April, Broadhempston, Devon: Philip Pearse, son of Philip & Purthesay (Avery - m. 19 May 1702 Broadhempston), baptised. Marries Grace Grant, Broadhempston, 22 May 1743. They have six children: Elizabeth (1744), Joan (1747), Philip (1756), William & Joan (twins - 1757), Joseph (?)[71]

 

22 August, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Thomas Brunscombe marries Sarah Webborn.[72] [poss children: William (1714), Thomas (1716-1728?), John (1719-1728?) Philip (1721), Zacharias (1722), Mary (1725-1752?), Hugh (1727-1751?). Thomas d. before 1768, poss in 1728? Or this could be Thomas junior, bp.1716. Sarah d.1768]

 

James; Brownscombe, member of the Livery Company of Weavers, recorded as voting for all four Whig candidates in the London .[73] 

 

Treaty of Utrecht, between England and France, ends the war of the Spanish Succession, or Queen Anne's War. The French had to give up all settlement in Newfoundland, but they did retain their fishing rights.[74] By leaving the Spanish empire and its trading monopolies substantially intact, the treaty sought to establish a stable state system in Europe and overseas based upon the balance of power. Instead, it perpetuated the principle causes of colonial conflict. territorial expansion continued throughout the eighteenth century and led to serious clashes between Portugal and Spain in the Banda Oriental (Uruguay), between Spain and Great Britain in Georgia and between Great Britain and France in North America. Trading monopolies proved an even greater source of friction. Illegal trade with the Spanish empire flourished and Spanish attempts to supress British and Dutch smugglers from Jamaica, St.Eustatius and Curacao reduced the Caribbean to a state of undeclared war. Further north, British efforts to enforce similar restrictions on its American colonists provoked resistance and finally open revolt.[75]

 

Philip de Branscomb churchwarden of Clyst St.George.[76] [poss bp.1694 Broad Clyst, son of Richard?]

 

`The churchwardens were not only ecclesiastical officers, but they were also Civil officers. For the civil part of their duties, they were under the Justices of the Peace of the district. They were also locally responsible for the military affairs of the parish. Previous to the establishment of the Militia, in 1757, each parish had to supply its quota of trained soldiers, who had to muster occasionally, for training ... Another part of the churchwarden's duties was the extermination of vermin such as wild cats, badgers, foxes, otters, hedgehogs, etc.. The prices for killing these vermin were paid by the churchwardens, and ranged from 6s 8d for a vixen to a penny for a stoat or weasel.[77]

 

2 December, Littleham: Arthur Branscombe (bp.1689 Littleham, sixth child of William Branscombe of Exmouth & Mary (Crutchet - m.1676 Littleham)), marries spinster Elizabeth Callard. Both of this parish.[78] [poss children of this marriage: Mary (1715), Arthur (1718), John (1723-1723), Elizabeth (1725)? According to Summers documents, Arthur senior lived in Newfoundland and Arthur junior was buried at St.John's (1800)]

 

Exeter, St Edmund: Jos Branscomb marries Ele Pine. [79]

 

@1714

16 January, Sandford: Philip Brownscomb of Crediton, & Mary Peck of Crediton, marry.[80] [son Philip bp.1724 Crediton]

 

7 March, Withycombe Raleigh: Thomas Branscoom, son of James & Magdalen (Hennocks - m.1708 Exeter), baptised.[81] [Or 1718? poss sibling James (1711 Littleham)? Poss Magdalen remarries in Ilsington 1716?]

 

25 June, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): William Brunscombe baptised, son of Thomas & Sarah.[82] [Thomas m.1713 Oakford, Sarah Webborn. Poss other children: Thomas (1716-1728?), John (1719-1728?), Philip (1721), Zacharias (1722), Mary (1725-1752?), Hugh (1727-1751?). Thomas senior d. before 1768, poss in 1728? Or this death could be Thomas junior, bp.1719? Sarah d.1768]

 

1 July, St.Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Joshua Branscomb marries Mary Childon. (IGI) [cf:1715]

 

10 July, St.David's, Exeter: Martha Brannscombe marries Zechariah Scutt. [83]

 

11 December, Morchard Bishop: William Brawnscomb, son of Joseph, buried.[84]

 

Reign of Queen Anne ends (since 1702). She is the last monarch of the Stuart Dynasty (1603-1714). George I of Hanover succeeds (to 1727), the first monarch of the House of Hanover & Windsor (to present).

 

Crediton: John Branscombe, serge-maker, marries Sara Pitts.[85] [cf:1719 marriage allegation]

 

Exeter, St Thomas: Jos Branscomb marries My Childon. [86]

 

@1715

1 January 1715, George Regina - 1804: Indenture between William Branscombe, yeoman, & Elizabeth his wife, of Colaton Raleigh, and William Fforpe/Ffoch?, of Farringdon, regarding lands at Drupe. (EPNI) `Drupe Farm (now transformed into holiday cottages) was, in 1330, the home of William atte Thrope. In 1388 it was called Thorp and became Droope in 1679. The name is interesting in being the only example of the Old English Thorp (roughly, a dependent or outlying dairy farm belonging to a village or manor) which has been noted, in Devon.'[87]

15 January, St.Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Joshua, son of Joshua [& Mary Childon? - m.1714] Branscombe, christened. (IGI)

3 July, Littleham: Thomas Brancomb buried.[88] [poss m.1646 Littleham to Susanna Elson? OR poss Thomas, second child of Thomas & Susanna (Elson - m.1646 Littleham)?]

 

14 October, Littleham: Mary Branscomb, daughter of Arthur, baptised.[89] [Poss first child of Arthur and Elizabeth (Callard - m.1713)? Poss siblings: Arthur (1718), John (1723-1723), Elizabeth (1725)? According to Summers documents, Arthur senior lived in Newfoundland and Arthur junior was buried at St.John's (1800). Another poss sibling: Simon (1728, bp. Withycombe Raleigh)]

 

Jacobite Rising.

 

The last of the Branscombe/Hart marriage settlements (since 1650).[90] [cf:1712 William Branscombe marries Elizabeth Hart in Exeter]

 

Lancelot "Capability" Brown, landscape gardener, is born.

 

`A handful of great lords, the Dukes of Newcastle, Bedford, Devonshire and some others, received £30, 000 a year or more in rent, besides what they might get in government salaries and pensions, but the bulk of the landed gentry, the real country squires, received rentals of a few hundred pounds a year, but still many times the average family income. It had to be so, since they were the principal servant-keeping class, and they usually employed in their households and home farms from about five to forty servants. The aristocracy and gentry were not only te richest class, individually at least, but they were in the strictest sense the ruling class. As the only group with both the leisure and the wealth for politics in a system of government run mainly by amateurs, they were the rulers of England at every level from the Cabinet to the parish. The King's Ministers were, with a few exceptions in the law offices of state, great landowners or their relations. The civil service, as we should now call it, consisted of their appointees from among their friends and relations. The House of Lords was to all intents and purposes a House of landlords. Four fifths of the House of Commons comprised landowners and their relations, and the rest were chiefly their friends and dependants. In the counties the lords lieutenant and high sheriffs were drawn from the greatest landlords, while the effective county government for almost all purposes was in the Bench of Justices of the Peace, drawn from the landed gentry. In the villages the squire's word, whether or not he was a J.P., was law, backed up by the threat of eviction or the withdrawal of his custom from the village traders. Three quarters of the population lived in the coutryside, but even in the smaller towns the local landowners were often almost as influential as in the villages, and it was only in the comparitively few great cities - and no town outside London had more than 50, 000 inhabitants, and most had less than 20, 000 - that the men of the middle ranks, the greater merchants and lawyers, could control their own affairs and elect their own M.P.s.'[91]

 

The period 1600-1715 was the flowering of the south-west wool-weaving trade, centred on Exeter. The serges were renowned as hard-wearing. Barnstaple and Bideford were the main receiving ports for Irish wool. Crediton and Morchard Bishop were local weaving centres.

 

@1716

30 April, Withycombe Raleigh: William Branscoomb buried.[92] [poss husband of Joan? Poss bp.1662 Woodbury, poss second child of Bartholomew & Martha? No record so far of his marriage. Poss children: Charity (1689-1695?), John (1690), William (1695/1696?), Martha (1698), Mary (1700-1701?)?]

 

13 June, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Thomas Brunscombe baptised, son of Thomas & Sarah.[93] [Thomas m.1713 Oakford, Sarah Webborn. Poss other children: William (1714), John (1719-1728?), Philip (1721), Zacharias (1722), Mary (1725-1752?), Hugh (1727-1751?). Thomas senior d. before 1768, poss in 1728? Or this death could be Thomas junior? Sarah d.1768]

 

27 December, Ilsington [nr.Newton Abbot]: Magdalene Branscombe marries Edward Furlong. (IGI) [formerly Hennocks, m.1708 Exeter, James Branscombe?]

 

31 December: Inventory attached to the will of George Pike of Colaton Raleigh signed by William Branscombe, and others.[94] [cf:1715 William Branscombe, yeoman of Colaton Raleigh & his wife Elizabeth. Also Branscombe connections with Drupe farm, Colaton Raleigh, from 1614-1739]

 

Crediton: Dor Brounscombe marries Jn Woodyetts & Thos Brounscombe marries Jo Wills. [95]

 

@1717

2 January, Morchard Bishop: Elizabeth Brawnscomb, wife of John, buried.[96]

 

9 February, Withycombe Raleigh: Martha Branscombe marries Stephen Chard.[97] [or 1718? Poss bp.1698 Withycombe, poss fourth child of William (d.1716?) & Joan?]

 

12 February, Talaton: John Branscomb marries Ann Mare. (IGI) [cf:1699 Thomazine Branscombe/Mare - 1790 John Branscombe m. Agnes Mare. Also cf:1702 Talaton, Robert Branscombe m. Agnes Ayres. Poss children all bp. Talaton: William (1718), Thomas (1721, d. before 1736?), Mary (1723), Sarah (poss d. before 1727), Sarah (possible duplication? 1726), John & Sarah (1727, Sarah poss d. before 1733?), Elizabeth (1731), Sarah (1733), Thomas (1736)?]

 

14 October, Morchard Bishop: Joanna Brownscomb, wife of John, buried.[98]

 

@1718

5 January, Littleham: Arthur Branscomb baptised.[99] [poss second child of Arthur & Elizabeth (Callard - m.1713)? Poss siblings: Mary (1715), John (1723-1723), Elizabeth (1725), Simon (bp.1728 Withycombe Raleigh)? According to Summers documents, Arthur senior lived in Newfoundland and Arthur junior was buried at St.John's (1800)]

 

9 February, Withycombe Raleigh: Martha Branscoomb marries Stephen Chard.[100] [or 1717? or 1719?]

 

7 March, Withycombe Raleigh: Thomas, son of James & Magdalen Branscombe, baptised.[101] [or 1713? Magdalen (Hennox - m.1708 Exeter) re-married in 1716?]

 

15 May, Bishopsteignton: Peter Pearse marries Mary Walters of Bishopsteignton.[102] [poss parents of Elizabeth, bapt. 1722, who may be future wife of Edward Branscombe of Dawlish?]

 

9 November, St.Edmund's, Exeter: Joshuea Branscomb marries Elener Pine. (IGI) [cf:1695, Roger Pyne, neighbour of Joshua Branscombe, locksmith, off Arch Lane]

 

3 December, Talaton: William Branscomb, son of John, baptised. (IGI) [poss first child of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? Poss siblings: William (1718), Thomas (1721, d. before 1736?), Mary (1723), Sarah (poss d. before 1727), Sarah (possible duplication? 1726), John & Sarah (1727, Sarah poss d. before 1733?), Elizabeth (1731), Sarah (1733), Thomas (1736). Poss. William d. Bampton 1751?]

 

William Branscombe of Colaton Raleigh mentioned in the will of George Pike of Colaton Raleigh, 1718. (EBMI) [cf:1716]

 

The will of Hugh Brownscomb of Knowstone is proved in the Court of the Archdeaconry of Barnstaple.[103]

 

St.Peter's, Exeter: John Brownscombe marries Mary Bellamy.[104]

 

@1719

9 February, Withycombe Raleigh: Martha Branscoomb marries Richard Chard. Both of this parish.[105] [duplicates of this marriage 1717, 1718? Poss daughter of William and (Joan?) of Withycombe? Poss siblings: Charity (1689-1695?), John (1690), William (1695/1696?), Mary (1700-1701?)?]

 

29 March, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): John Brunscombe baptised, son of Thomas & Sarah.[106] [Thomas m.1713 Oakford, Sarah Webborn. Poss other children: William (1714), John (1719-1728?), Philip (1721), Zacharias (1722), Mary (1725-1752?), Hugh (1727-1751?). Thomas d. before 1768, poss in 1728? Or this could be Thomas junior, bp.1716. Sarah d.1768]

 

9 April, Chittlehampton: James, son of Thomas & Elizth Branscomb, christened. (IGI) [cf:1721 possible sister Ann]

 

29 June, St.Andrew's, Plymouth: John Branscomb marries Mary Harris.[107][possibly parents of John (bp.1720), Richard (bp.1722), Thomas (bp.1728), all Callington? Also cf:1760 John of Callington’s will]

 

`Perhaps the only real factory in early eighteenth-century England was the Lombe brothers' silk mill on the Derwent near Derby in 1719, with its 300 throwing machines driven by a giant waterwheel. Such modern-seeming industrial workers were not only in a minority but scattered in small and mainly rural establishments near the water power, the clay, the saltings, the metal ore, the woodland charcoal, and so on, across the countryside. The majority of industrial wokers were individual outworkers and their families, working in their own homes for a capitalist merchant, to whose warehouse they tramped weekly with the finished goods on their own backs or on those of donkeys or packhorses. In addition to all these, the landless labour force supplied thousands of transport workers on the roads and the waterways - post-boys and packhorsemen, coachmen and guards, waggoners and their boys, bargees and `halers' [labourers who would haul boats and barges along waterways], dockers and sailors, and many more ... '[108]

 

27 August: Marriage allegation between John Brannscombe of Crediton, sergemaker, and Sarah Pitts of same, widow. Bound by John Norris of Milton Abbot, (...?). [109][cf:1714 marriage]

 

31 December: Marriage allegations between John Locke of Thorverton, mason, and Margaret Cross of same. Bound by John Brownscombe of Crediton, husbandman. [110]

 

@1720

10 January, Dawlish: John Branscomb buried.[111] Son of Nicholas & Susan. [b.30 October, 1687 - cf: 12 July IGI Adams marriage? Also cf: Thomas, poss brother of John, married Joan Adams in Exmouth, 1702]

 

 

Here lieth ye body of John ye son of Nicholas & Susan Branscomb of this psh and husband of Mary daughter of Thomas & Bethieh Adams who died January ye 6(?) Ano Doni 1720 Aged 33 years 2 months and six days

 

12 January, Whitestone: Elisabeth Pierce, daughter of Thomas, is baptised.[112] [cf:1725 - double entry?]

 

6 February: Marriage allegation between Charles Davis of Lympstone and Sarah Davis of the same, spinster. Bound by Richard Suxbitch of Clyst St George, yeoman. [113]

 

7 February: Marriage allegation between Richard Suxbitch and Grace Brannscombe of Woodbury, spinster. Bound by Henry Quentin of Topsham, (nautain?) and William Stone of Exeter, whitebaker. [114]

 

7 February, St.Peter's, Exeter: Grace Brannscombe marries Richard Suxpitch. (IGI) [cf:1657 Grace Brannscombe baptised, Woodbury, dtr of John & Grace (Clapp - m.1656 Woodbury)]

 

Polwhele says of the Suxpitch family:

 

`... perhaps the family of Sucpitch or Sokespitch is the only one which, from before the Conquest to the present day [1793], has existed without any material change of place or station. The Sucpitches possess two small parchment grants or feoffments, which were passed before the Conqueror's time: these curious antique charters are their only archives. The whole series of these people, from the original down to the present descendent, seem to have been actuated by one common disposition, to have adopted a narrow plan, and invariably adhered to it; that is, to preserve their estate entire, without addition or diminution: and to transmit a posterity uninterrupted in the male line, was their highest ambition.'[115]

 

12 July, Woodbury: Mrs Mary Adams marries John Braunscombe (sailor of Dawlish?).[116] (IGI) [cf: 10 January this year. Also cf:1730 for possible duplication? Poss John bp.1700, son of Philip? Also cf: Branscombe/Adams marriages, Dawlish]

 

15 July, St. Mary’s, Callington, Cornwall: John, son of John Branscomb, is baptised. (IGI) [poss. John & Mary (Harris, m.1719 Plymouth St Andrew)? cf:1722 Richard, 1728 Thomas, 1760 John's will]

 

2 October, Bishopsteignton: Peter, son of Peter & Mary (Walters? m.1718?) Pearse, is baptised.[117] [cf:1722 for sister Elizabeth - poss future wife of Edward Branscombe of Dawlish?]

 

27 October, London: George Branscomb ordered to be removed from Newgate Prison and transported to Maryland, aboard the ship Gilbert.[118]

 

2 November, Littleham: Sarah Branscomb marries James Geiles.[119] [poss bp 1693 Littleham, seventh child of William Branscombe of Exmouth & Mary (Crutchet - m.1676 Littleham)? Poss siblings: William (1679), James (1681), William (bp 1682, d.1728?), Simon (bp 1684, d.1741?), James (bp 1686), Arthur (bp 1689)? Sarah poss d.1720?]

 

Approximate year Richard Branscombe born. Emigrated to Maryland 1735/6? - m. Sarah Proctor 1744 Virginia. [cf:1722 Richard of Callington]

 

The Bubble Act: Panic measure passed by parliament as a direct consequence of public scandal caused by the collapse of the south Sea Company. The Act prohibited the formation of joint-stock companies, unless sanctioned by parliament. It was not very effective, and was repealed in 1825.

 

Dawlish: Nicholas Branscombe, & John Branscombe of (Corksbrook?), pay church rates for property in the parish.[120]

 

@1721

20? May, Dawlish: Johanna?, daughter of John ?Branscombe?, born.[121]

 

29? ?, Dawlish: (Doll?/Daff?), daughter of John Brownascombe?, born.[122] [cf:1723]

 

5 May, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Philip Brunscombe baptised, son of Thomas & Sarah.[123] [Thomas m.1713 Oakford, Sarah Webborn. Poss other children: William (1714), Thomas (1716-1728?), John (1719-1728?), Zacharias (1722), Mary (1725-1752?), Hugh (1727-1751?). Thomas d. before 1768, poss in 1728? Or this could be Thomas junior, bp.1716. Sarah d.1768]

 

29 May: Marriage allegation between Edward Haydon of Kingston, Somerset, gardener, and Ann Branscombe of Upton Hellions, spinster. Bound by Peter Bolt of Exeter, woolcomber. [124]

 

29 May, St.Peter's, Exeter: Ann Branscombe marries Edward Haydon. (IGI)

 

11 June, Talaton: Thomas, son of John Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss second child of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? Poss siblings: William (1718), Mary (1723), Sarah (poss d. before 1727), Sarah (possible duplication? 1726), John & Sarah (1727, Sarah poss d. before 1733?), Elizabeth (1731), Sarah (1733), Thomas (1736). Poss Thomas m. before 1745 Anne ?, and baptised three children at Ottery St.Mary, Peter (1745), Elizabeth (1749), Sarah (1752)?]

 

14 July, Chittlehampton: Ann, daughter of Thomas & Elizabeth Branscomb, christened. (IGI) [cf:1719 possible brother James]

 

5 September, Shobrooke: Dorothy Brownscombe marries Matthew Cudmore. [125]

 

Guy's Hospital, Southwark, established by the bookseller Thomas Guy.

 

@1722

12 February, St Mary’s, Callington, Cornwall: Richard, son of John Branscomb, baptised. (IGI) [poss. John & Mary (Harris, m.1719 Plymouth St Andrew)? cf:1720 John, 1728 Thomas, 1760 John's will. This is a candidate for Richard of Virginia, who founded the American Branscombs]

 

22 March, Oakford [nr.Bampton]: Zacharias Branscombe, son of Thomas & Sarah, is baptised. (IGI) [Thomas m.1713 Oakford, Sarah Webborn. Poss other children: William (1714), Thomas (1716-1728?), John (1719-1728?), Philip (1721), Mary (1725-1752?), Hugh (1727-1751?). Thomas d. before 1768, poss in 1728? Or this could be Thomas junior, bp.1716. Sarah d.1768. Zacharias prob m.1755 Cadeleigh, Tiverton]

 

27 March, Crediton: Ann Brownscombe marries John Sharland. (IGI)

 

20 April, St.Peter's Cathedral, Exeter: Mary Brannscombe marries William Baker. (IGI)

 

24 May, Bishopsteignton: Elizabeth, daughter of Peter & Mary (Walters? m.1718?) Pearse, baptised.[126] [poss future wife of Edward Branscombe of Dawlish? cf:1720 for brother Peter]

 

20 December, Dawlish: Joanna(?) Brimmacombe(?) [Branscombe?] born.

 

Abram Branscombe instituted to the living of Eggesford, Devon (to 1734).[127] [cf:1732]

 

`Perhaps the decline of smallpox [in the eighteenth century] was a result of the discovery of inoculation. Lady Mary Wortley Mantagu brought the idea from the Middle East in 1722. The usual way to carry out inoculation was to find someone suffering from smallpox and draw a thread through one of his sores. The doctor would then make a slight cut on the arm of the person to be inoculated and draw the thread through that in turn. If all went well the patient would have a mild attack of smallpox and thereafter be immune, but there were dangers. Possibly the attack of smallpox would be severe and the patient would die.'[128] [cf:1798 - Jenner discovers vaccination]

 

Samuel Weymouth [Waymouth], tobacconist, apprentice of Lazarus Mecho, admitted to the Freedom of the City of Exeter.

 

Daniel Defoe's Moll Flanders published.

 

@1723

2 January, St.Gregory's, Dawlish: Susannah Branscombe [b.1689?], daughter of Susanna & Nicholas Branscombe, mariner of Dawlish, & Andrew Norton marry.[129] [cf: Nicolas Branscombe's will, 1724. Sussana Norton pays a church rate at Shutterton & at Esdon, in 1782/3]

 

5 March: Marriage allegations between Thomas Branscombe of Morchard Bishop and Eliz Lane of same, spinster. Bound by William (Morchay?) of Thorverton, yeoman. [130]

 

6 March, St.Peter's Cathedral, Exeter: Thomas Branscombe marries Elizabeth Lane. (IGI)

 

17 June, Talaton: Mary Branscomb, daughter of John, baptised. (IGI) [poss third child of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? Poss siblings: William (1718), Thomas (1721, d. before 1736?), Sarah (poss d. before 1727), Sarah (possible duplication? 1726), John & Sarah (1727, Sarah poss d. before 1733?), Elizabeth (1731), Sarah (1733), Thomas (1736)]

 

5 August, Littleham: John Branscomb, son of Arthur & Elizabeth, baptised.[131] [d. October. Poss third child of Arthur & Elizabeth (Callard - m.1713)? Possible siblings: Mary (1715), Arthur (1718), Elizabeth (1725)? According to Summers documents, Arthur senior lived in Newfoundland and Arthur junior was buried at St.John's (1800). Another poss sibling: Simon (1728, bp. Withycombe Raleigh)]

 

2 October, Littleham: John Branscomb, son of Arthur & Elizabeth, buried.[132]

 

5 December: Marriage allegations between Gidley Burges of Topsham, Mariner, and Martha Peters of same, spinster. Bound by Nicholas Brannscombe of Dawlish (hant?) [133]

 

5 December: Marriage allegations between Andrew Norton of Littleham, Mariner, and Susanna Braunscombe of Dawlish, spinster. Bound by George Gould of Exeter, Linen draper, and John Truslake of Exeter, (agri). [134][married, 2 January, Dawlish]

 

24 December, Dawlish: (Doll?), daughter of John Browinacomb [Branscombe?], born. [cf:1721]

 

Abraham Branscombe, son of John Branscombe, a pauper of Morchard [Bishop?], appointed rector of Eggesford, Devon. He gained his B.A. from Exeter College, Oxford in 1710. He is appointed rector of Chawleigh [next village] in 1732.[135] [cf:1778 Abraham Branscombe & John Churchill, rector of Eggesford, witness the marriage of Robert Leach & Elizabeth Davy]

 

Crediton: Phil Brounscombe marries Sarah Buckingham, Sus Brownscomb marries Phil Buckingham, & Sar Brownscomb marries Jn Jerrett. [136][cf:1741 Branscombe/Buckingham marriage in Bideford]

 

@1724

9 June, Dawlish: Nicholas Branscombe, mariner of Dawlish, makes his will:

 

In the Name of God Amen

I Nicholas Branscombe of the Parish of Dawlish in the County of Devon marriner being now in health and of good Memory do Make and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and form following First I comend my soul into the hands of almighty God who gave it me and my Body to the earth from whence it came in hopes of a joyfull resurrection thr'o the Merits of my Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ and for all such Worldly Goods or Chattles Lands Estates as it hath plesed God to bestow upon me and Give and Bequeath as followeth - First I do order that my Body shall be buried in Christian Burial according to the discretion of my Executrix hereafter mentioned Item I give unto
Joan Matter(face/fall/faie?) my Daughter in Law five Pounds starling to be paid in Six Months after my decease by my Executrix Or Order Item I give unto Julian Best widow formerly Wife of John Best deceased of Stokentinhead after mine and my wife Susanna Branscombe's decease all that cottage with the appurtnces belonging to it formerly in all Possession of John Bowdon Senr. lying and being in the Parish of Ashcombe during her natural life and after her death to John (Wilken?) her Grandson Son of Nicholas (Wilking?) deceased so long as they lives, I have now on it to say, Susanna Branscombe now Susanna (Nortton?) and Nicholas Arthur Son of James Arthur of Ashcombe do live Item I give unto John Best Son of Stephen Best Twenty Shillings to be paid in Six Months after my death

Item I give unto Susanna Gottbead wife of Anthony Gottbead Twenty Shillings to be paid in Six Months after my decease Item I give unto John Paddon son of

Elizabeth Paddon five Pounds starling to buy his Life on the House his Mother now lives in provided I do not buy it from him before, if not then not to have it, before he doth buy the House Item I Give unto the under bearers of my Body to my Grave a pair of Gloves and one Shilling each Item I give unto Mary Barker[137] formerly the wife of my Son John Branscombe[138] a plaine Silver Dish holding about a Pint of Liquor after my buriall Item I give unto Susanna (Frinde?) the Daughter of William (Kelly/Helly?) deceased Twenty Shillings to be paid in Six Months after my decease Item I give unto the Poor of the Parish of Dawlish Five Pounds Starling to be paid in Six Months after my decease As for all the rest of my Lands Tenements Goods moveable and immoveable and whatsoever I now enjoy I Give unto Susanna Branscombe my wife whom I make my sole Executrix of this my last Will and Testament Revoking all other Wills and Testaments whatsoever and the Lands I bought of James (Rood?) Esqr to goe to Susanna Nortton's younger children after the death of Susanna my wife, that is to say the House I now live in with the two cotts adjoining and the (Exberries?) and Windgates to be equally divided amongst them But for Cofford in Kenton and (Cock/Cork) street in Dawlish to continue in the right Line of the Branscombes which is my desire

 

Whereunto I set my Hand and Seal this ninth day of June 1724

 

Nicho Branscombe  (seal)

 

Sealed Signed and Delivered in the Presence of

 

Edward Slocombe

Edward Tucker

The Mark of                John Kerswill

 

Note attached in 1793:

The Probate is with Sir Robert Palk Bart. the Purchaser of Cofford Estate in Kenton and this is a true copy whereof

            John Gribble                           John Luxton
[139]

 

28 August, Crediton: Philip, son of Philip Branscomb & Mary (Peck - m.1714), baptised. (IGI)

 

22 November, Talaton: Sarah Branscomb, daughter of John, baptised. (IGI) [poss fourth child of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? Poss d. before 1727? Poss siblings: William (1718), Thomas (1721, d. before 1736?), Mary (1723), Sarah (poss duplication? 1726), John & Sarah (1727, Sarah poss d. before 1733?), Elizabeth (1731), Sarah (1733), Thomas (1736)]

 

24 November, East Budleigh: Sarah Brancom, daughter of Philip & Eleanor, baptised.[140] [siblings: Eleanor (1729), Mary (1731), Samuel (1734)]

 

Approximate year of birth of William Branscombe, probably in Tiverton/Bampton. [d. 1757 - husband of Sarah, father of William, Bartholomew & James]

 

Daniel Defoe begins his Tour of the Whole Island of Great Britain. (to 1726)

 

Feniton: At some stage after 1724, Peter Branscombs is churchwarden at St.Andrew's and possibly a tenant of William Skinner (?) He is shown in the tithe-book as making 10 hogsheads of cider from a smallholding of less than 56 acres in the parish.[141] [Peter senior poss bp.1659, son of Peter & Dorothy (Palmer - m.1649 Feniton)? If so, his sister Dorothy married Josias Skinner in 1609. In 1614, George Skinner was rector of Feniton. cf:1704 Peter bp. Feniton, son of Peter, 1707 Thomas bp. Feniton, son of Peter. This is the last reference to Feniton in the database. The first is in 1571, the approximate year of birth of George Branscombe, later a butcher in Feniton, and probably the son of weaver Osmund & Joan]

 

The will of Jn Brownscombe of Cheriton Bishop, is proved.[142] [cf:1725 testamentary cause, John Brownscombe of Cheriton Bishop. Also cf:1726 - Mary Brownscombe of Cheriton Bishop makes her will]

 

Bideford: Elizabeth Brownscombe marries ? [143]

 

Crediton: Sar Brounscomb marries Jas Madge. [144]

 

@1725

2 June, Whitestone: James Brinscombe marries Mary Hawkes.[145] [IGI says 1735]

 

29 June, Whitestone: Elisabeth Pierce, daughter of Thomas, baptised.[146] [poss m. Edward Branscombe 1747 Dawlish? cf:1720 - double entry? In 1634, in Whitestone, which is about four miles west of Exeter, Agnes Branscombe marries John Pearse]

 

25 August, Littleham: Elizabeth Branscombe, daughter of Arthur & Elizabeth, baptised.[147] [poss fourth and last child of Arthur & Elizabeth (Callard - m.1713)? Possible siblings: Mary (1715), Arthur (1718), John (1723-1723)? According to Summers documents, Arthur senior lived in Newfoundland and Arthur junior was buried at St.John's (1800). Another poss sibling: Simon (1728, bp. Withycombe Raleigh)]

 

12 September, Oakford [nr.Bampton]: Mary Branscombe, daughter of Thomas, baptised. (IGI) [Thomas m.1713 Oakford, Sarah Webborn. Poss other children: William (1714), Thomas (1716-1728?), John (1719-1728?), Philip (1721), Zacharias (1722), Hugh (1727-1751?). Thomas d. before 1768, poss in 1728? Or this could be Thomas junior, bp.1716. Sarah d.1768. Mary poss d.1752]

 

27 October: Marriage allegations between John Dennis of Broad Clyst, agri, and Anne Branscombe, alias Lockington, of Whimple. Bound by John (Halfyard?) of Whimple, Smith. [148]

 

28 October, Rockbeare [nr.Whimple]: Ann Branscomb, or Lackington, marries John Dennis. (IGI)

 

John Brownscombe of Cheriton Bishop - testamentary cause.[149] [cf:1726 - Mary Brownscombe of Cheriton Bishop makes her will]

 

Vivaldi completes his Four Seasons.

 

Sandford: Mary Brownscombe marries ? [150]

 

Pinhoe: Mary Branscombe marries ? [151]

 

@1726

24 January, Sandford: Mary [S?] Brownscombe, [1700-1778], daughter of Robert & Joan (Carpenter - m.1698), marries Robert Southcott. [in Morchard Bishop 1758, weaver Abraham Branscombe marries Frances Southcott, b.1733]

 

11 June: Elizabeth Michell, only daughter and heir of Benjamin Michell of Seaside, Branscombe, is married to John Heard of Bridgwater. Parents of Elizabeth, b. 11 March 1726/7 Bridgwater, m.1747 to James Branscomb of Exmouth.

 

August: George Pierce sentenced by Devon Assizes to transportation to America. Mary Pearse reprieved, probably from sentence of death, or burning in the hand, to 14 years transportation.[152]

 

22 November, Talaton: Sarah, daughter of John Branscomb christened. (IGI) [poss duplication? cf:1724 Sarah]

 

10 December, Dawlish: John (Branscome?) buried.[153]

 

Mary Brownscombe of Cheriton Bishop makes her will.[154] [cf:1724, the will of Jn Brownscombe of Cheriton Bishop, is made. Also cf:1725 testamentary cause, John Brownscombe of Cheriton Bishop]

 

Lloyd's List is published, a revival of the failed Lloyd's News (1696), specialising in news of ships, voyages and merchant ventures.[155]

 

St.Petrock's, Exeter: John Brownscombe marries Mgy Small.[156]

 

@1727

1 March, Okeford (Oakford): Hugh Brunscombe baptised, son of Thomas and Sarah.[157] [Thomas m.1713 Oakford, Sarah Webborn. Poss other children: William (1714), Thomas (1716-1728?), John (1719-1728?), Philip (1721), Zacharias (1722), Mary (1725-1752?). Thomas d. before 1768, poss in 1728? Or this could be Thomas junior, bp.1716. Sarah d.1768. Hugh poss d.1751?]

 

10 March, Talaton: John, son of John Branscomb, christened. (IGI) [poss sixth child of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? Poss siblings: William (1718), Thomas (1721, d. before 1736?), Mary (1723), Sarah (poss d. before 1727), Sarah (possible duplication? 1726), Sarah (1727, Sarah poss d. before 1733?), Elizabeth (1731), Sarah (1733), Thomas (1736)]

 

11 March 1726/7, Bridgewater: Elizabeth Heard, first child of John & Elizabeth (Michell of Seaside, Branscombe - m.1726), is born. Elizabeth junior m.1747 James Branscomb of Exmouth.[158]

 

3 April, Talaton: Sarah, daughter of John Branscomb christened. (IGI) [poss seventh child of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? Poss siblings: William (1718), Thomas (1721, d. before 1736?), Mary (1723), Sarah (poss d. before 1727), Sarah (possible duplication? 1726), John (1727), Elizabeth (1731), Sarah (1733), Thomas (1736)]

 

5 June, Morchard Bishop: William Brawnscomb, son of John junior, baptised.[159]

 

31 July: Joshua Branscombe becomes a Freeman of the city of Exeter, by apprenticeship as a woolcomber.

 

8 August, Crediton: Mary Branscombe marries Walter Hall. [160]

 

26 August, Morchard Bishop: William Brawnscomb, son of John junior, buried.[161]

 

22 October, Bampton: John Branscomb of Bampton dies, aged 64.[162] [poss bp.1664 Oakford, son of John & Ann (Lea - m.1655 St.Peter's, Exeter)? Poss siblings: Hugh (1658), Joyce (1661), Mary (1666). Bampton is 2½ miles from Oakford]

 

John Brownscombe of Powderham makes his will.[163] [this is the only Branscombe reference in Powderham, so far]

 

Reign of King George I of Hanover ends (since 1714). George II succeeds (to 1760).

 

@1728

19 January, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Thomas Brunscombe buried.[164] [poss Thomas m.1713 Oakford, Sarah Webborn. Or poss Thomas, their son, bp.1716? Poss other children: William (1714), John (1719-1728?), Philip (1721), Zacharias (1722), Mary (1725-1752?), Hugh (1727-1751?). Thomas d. before 1768. Sarah d.1768]

 

9 February, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): John Brunscombe buried.[165] [poss third child of Thomas m.1713 Oakford, & Sarah Webborn. Poss other children: William (1714), Thomas (1716-1728?), Philip (1721), Zacharias (1722), Mary (1725-1752?), Hugh (1727-1751?). Thomas d. before 1768, poss in January of this year? Or this could be Thomas junior, bp.1716? Sarah d.1768]

 

10 April, Morchard Bishop: Mr. John Brawnscomb buried.[166]

 

3 June, Morchard Bishop: Elizabeth Brawnscomb, daughter of John, baptised.[167]

 

21 June, St. Mary’s, Callington, Cornwall: Thomas, son of John Branscomb, is baptised. (IGI) [poss. John & Mary (Harris, m.1719 Plymouth St Andrew)? cf:1720 John, 1722 Richard, 1760 John's will]

 

3 August, Littleham: William Branscome buried.[168] [poss m.1676 Littleham, Mary (Crutchet?) OR poss William, bp 1682 Littleham, third child of William Branscombe of Exmouth & Mary (Crutchet - m.1676 Littleham)? If so, poss siblings: William (1679), James (1681), Simon (bp 1684, d.1741?), James (bp 1686), Arthur (bp 1689), Sarah (bp 1659, m.1683?)?]

 

15 August, Crewe, Cheshire: Thomas Brancome marries Marie Gane. (IGI) [IGI93 notes: Relation of Clarence Olsen]

 

26 October, Wembworthy: Mr. Abr Branscom, rector of Eggesford, marries Mrs. Ann Scott of High Birchington.[169]

 

18 December, Withycombe Raleigh: Simon Branscoom, son of Arthur & Eliz, baptised.[170] [Possible siblings: Mary (1715), Arthur (1718), John (1723 d.1723), Elizabeth (1725), all Littleham baptisms. Simon possibly m.1754 in Stepney?]

 

Bering begins Russian reconnaissance of Alaska.

 

Newfoundland: Captain Arthur Branscombe (flourishes c1733-59). Master and owner of the sloop Hope, built 1728, registered at Exmouth. `A sober man, well-acquainted with the Halifax coast.' He is said to be `of Topsham'.[171]

 

Crediton: Mk Brounscomb marries An Smith. [172]

 

@1729

12 January, Dawlish: Susanna Branscombe buried.[173] [poss. wife of Nicholas, d.1724, but cf: note on Shutterton, below - could this date be 1730 in the old calendar?]

 

12 March, Morchard Bishop: Hannah, daughter of John Branscomb, christened.[174] (IGI) [poss mother Elizabeth?]

 

24 May, Crediton: Mary Branscombe marries Abraham Fulford. [175]

 

5 October, East Budleigh: Eleanor Branscomb, daughter of Philip & Eleanor, baptised.[176] [siblings: Sarah (poss d. before 1727), Mary (1731), Samuel (1734). Eleanor poss m.1752 Exeter, Joseph Guard?]

 

(9/15?) November, Dawlish: John Brimmescombe [Branscombe?] buried.

 

Widow Branscombe holds the estate of Shutterton in Dawlish parish, granted by Court Roll.[177] [Shutterton is at Cofton. cf:1696 - Nicholas Branscombe holds the estate of Shutterton, in Dawlish parish.[178] Poss. father of Thomas (1681), Nicholas (1685), John (1687), Susanna (1689) - poss. m.1677 Susanna Sawden - cf:1724 will for description of land holdings]

 

The hamlets around Dawlish include Cofton, Cockwood, Middlewood, Westwood & Holcombe.

 

Crediton: Jn Brounscomb marries An Tape. [179]

 

@1730

29 March, Crediton: Elisabeth Branscombe marries William Challacombe. [180]

 

12 July, Woodbury, Devon: John Braunscombe marries Mary ?Adames? (IGI) [cf:1720 for poss duplication]

 

First issue of The Gentleman's Magazine, including obituaries of the rich and famous. Marriages came later, and births later still.

 

In Kenton, George & Mary, George & Margaret, William & Ann and John & Anne Pearce suddenly appear in the parish registers, baptising children.[181] [cf:1707]

 

Dodbrooke?: Estimated year of birth of William Branscombe. [m. about 1750 Dodbrooke to Agnes C-? They have five children: Mary (1753), William (1755), James (1758), Richard (1759) & Samuel (1761), all baptised in Dodbrooke]

 

Approximate year of birth of Elizabeth Shapley, later first wife of Samuel Branscombe of Highweek. Died Highweek, 1772.[182]

 

Dawlish: Thomas Prowse becomes Vicar of St.Gregory's to 1789)

 

Abraham Branscombe of Teignmouth, a fishing captain who owns his own vessel, is said to be flourishing in the 1730s. [Newfoundland?][183]

 

@1731

1 January, Woodbury: John Taylor Branscombe, son of Hannah, christened. (IGI) [No father listed - cf:1706 for birth of Hannah, daughter of Phil. cf:1762 for marriage of John of Clyst St.George, to Sarah Howell of Woodbury]

 

20 March, Morchard Bishop: Dianisha, daughter of John Branscomb, christened. (IGI) [Dionysia m.1769 Exeter, Henry Westcott]

 

25 April, Talaton: Elizabeth, daughter of John Branscomb, christened. (IGI) [poss eighth child of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? Poss siblings: William (1718), Thomas (1721, d. before 1736?), Mary (1723), Sarah (poss d. before 1727), Sarah (possible duplication? 1726), John & Sarah (1727, Sarah poss d. before 1733?), Sarah (1733), Thomas (1736)]

 

August: John Pearse sentenced by Devon Assizes to transportation to Virginia.[184]

 

25 August, St Mary’s, Callington: Mary, dughter of John Branscomb and Mary his wife, buried, aged 6. [185]

 

1 October, Chittlehampton: Thomas Branscombe marries Mary Gilford. (IGI) [cf:1738 Thomas, 1740 William - poss children?]

 

29 December, East Budleigh: Mary Branscombe, daughter of Philip & Eleanor, baptised.[186] [siblings: Sarah (poss d. before 1727), Eleanor (1729), Samuel (1734)]

 

Jethro Tull's Horse-Hoing Husbandry published, giving first public details of the seed drill he invented in 1701. `[It] was not only the first practical drilling machine produced in England but the first important step towards the elimination of manual labour in farm operations in Britain.'[187]

 

Autobiographical account of New England pioneer life, written prior to 1691 by Captain Roger Clap, is published. [Clapp/Branscombe, cf:1656, 1703]

 

Captain Arthur Branscombe is the commander of the Molly of Exeter, on a voyage from Newfoundland to Exeter, with a cargo of molasses for Rufus Jordan and for himself. He is noted as commander of the same vessel, in 1732.[188]

 

Crediton: My Brounscomb marries Thos Ballamy. [189]

 

@1732

10 April: Marriage allegation between Nicholas Branscombe of Ilsington, farmer, and Elizabeth Stephens of same. Bound by Richard Bethell of St Thomas, inn-keeper. [190]

 

13 April, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): James Brunscombe marries Jone Carpenter.[191] [poss children: Bartholomew (1733), James (1740). Jone prob died, 1741]

 

25 December, St. Mary’s, Callington: Elizabeth Branchcombe buried. [192]

 

Abraham Branscombe, rector, instituted to the living of Chawleigh, Devon (to 1743).[193] [cf:1723]

 

William Branscomb, ship's captain of New Castle, New Hampshire, marries Elizabeth White.[194] [cf:1764]

 

Ilsington: Nicholas Branscombe, farmer? [195]

 

Exeter, St Thomas: Nic Brownscombe marries Eliz Stephens. [196]

 

@1733

7 February, Talaton: Sarah, daughter of John Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss ninth child of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? Poss siblings: William (1718), Thomas (1721, d. before 1736?), Mary (1723), Sarah (poss d. before 1727), Sarah (possible duplication? 1726), John & Sarah (1727, Sarah poss d. before 1733?), Elizabeth (1731), Thomas (1736)]

 

3 May, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Bartholomew Brunscombe baptised, son of James and Jone.[197] [James m.1732 Oakford, Jone Carpenter. Poss other child: James (1740). Jone prob d.1741]

 

July: Elizabeth Pearce sentenced by Devon Assizes to transportation to the American colonies.[198]

 

16 September, Witheridge: Andrew Brownscombe marries Elizabeth Mogford.[199]

 

The will of John Branscombe of Morchard Bishop is administered in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.[200]

 

Kay's Fly Shuttle.[201]

 

Approximate year of birth of Frances Southcott of Morchard Bishop, d.1808. [wife of serge-weaver Abraham Branscombe of East Worlington, m.1758, mother of William? (attorney) bp.1759 d.1796, Joseph, bp.1762, John bp.1764 & Elizabeth bp.1777 d.1799]

 

Newfoundland: Captain Arthur Branscombe (flourished c1733-59) is commander of the Hope on a voyage from St.John's to Exeter with a cargo of 140 quintals of fish for `Self and Company'.[202] [master and owner of the sloop "Hope" (50 tons - seven men), built 1728, registered at Exmouth. `A sober man, well-acquainted with the Halifax coast.' He is said to be `of Topsham']

 

William Branscombe is the commander of the brig Charming Sally (75 tons) of Portsmouth, New England, on a voyage to Fayal and the Mediterranean.[203]

 

@1734

23 May, Branscombe: Margret Waymouth marries George Oatten. (IGI)

 

26 May, St.Mary Magdalene, Old Fish Street, London: William Branscombe marries Jane Robinson. (IGI) [poss child Sarah bp.1738 Holborn? William poss son of James & Sarah (Martin - m.1697 Stepney), bp.1707 St.Dunstan Stepney?]

 

23 July, Morchard Bishop: Anne, daughter of John Branscomb, christened. (IGI)

 

26 August, East Budleigh: Samuel Branscomb, son of Philip & Eleanor, baptised.[204] [siblings: Sarah (poss d. before 1727), Eleanor (1729), Mary (1731)]

 

25 December, Dorchester, Dorset: Thomas, son of Thomas & Mary Branscome, is baptised. (IGI)

 

The will of John Brownscombe of Crediton is proved, in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.[205]

 

Parish register entries from this year are required to be in the Marriage Act form, requiring immediate signatures by parties & witnesses, and usually including professions of parties.

 

Newfoundland: Captain Arthur Branscombe (flourished c1733-59) is commander of the Hope on a voyage from St.John's to Spain or Portugal with a cargo of fish.[206] [master and owner of the sloop "Hope" (40 tons - five men), built 1728 in America, registered at Exmouth. `A sober man, well-acquainted with the Halifax coast.' He is said to be `of Topsham']

 

@1735

8 April, Crediton: Alice Brownscombe marries Will Anstey. (IGI) [cf:1777 Thomas Anstey bp. Dulverton, son of John & Elizabeth (Branscombe)]

 

2 June, Whitestone: James Brinscombe marries Mary Hawkes. (IGI) [or 1725?]

 

First practical ship's chronometer produced.

 

Richard Branscombe arrives in the Province of Maryland (or 1736), probably as an indentured servant. [b. circa 1720? - poss 1722 Callington, Cornwall?]

 

`Many a young man worked for passage-money to the Colonies, by going as an indentured servant. After the indenture was over, he was free to ask for a land grant, and bounty.'

 

Approximate year James Branscombe of Bampton is born. [d.1809 - Sir James, lay sheriff of London]

 

Approximate year Samuel Branscombe is born, possibly in  Highweek, Newton Bushel or Wolborough. He was a tanner in Kingsbridge, but may have been an inn keeper originally, owning The Miller's Wheel in Newton Abbot until it was destroyed by fire in 1791. Samuel marries Elizabeth Shapley in Highweek, in 1758, and they have at least four children: John (1760), Samuel (1764), William (1765), Richard (1767). Elizabeth dies in Highweek in 1772. There is a possibility Samuel then marries Mary Call (1772) and then/or Ann Quick, (1775), and produces four more children: Mary (1776-1784), Ann (1778-1784), Samuel (1780-1805) & Philip (1782-1795). Samuel probably dies in Highweek in 1801. [cf:1734 East Budleigh - Samuel Branscomb bp., son of  Philip & Eleanor]

 

Crediton: Jn Brounscomb marries Han Campe. [207]

 

@1736

3 February, Withycombe Raleigh: Joan Brandscomb buried.[208] [poss widow of William, d.1716? William poss bp.1662 Woodbury, poss second child of Bartholomew & Martha? No record so far of William & Joan's marriage. Poss children: Charity (1689-1695?), John (1690), William (1695/1696?), Martha (1698), Mary (1700-1701?)?]]

 

12 February, Littleham: Mary Branscom marries Joseph Wood.[209]

 

23 February, St.David's, Exeter: Phillip Branscombe marries Dorothy Braddick. [210]

 

13 March, Petton (Bampton): Hugh Branscombe marries Elizabeth Hill. (IGI) [cf:1737, Hugh Branscombe of Bampton makes his will. Also cf:1743, The will of Hugh Brownscombe of Bampton administered. There is no record, so far, of the baptism of Hugh. Also cf:1692 & 1751, Hugh Brownscombe of Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?), buried. Also cf:1727, Hugh Brunscombe baptised, Oakford, son of Thomas & Sarah]

 

10 May, St.Edmund's, Exeter: Joshua Branscombe marries Eleanor Hance. [211] [Joshua poss bp.1715 St.Thomas, son of Joshua & poss Mary (Childon - m.1714 St.Thomas)? Or poss son of Joshua & Eleanor (Pyne - m.1718 St.Edmund's?]

 

5 September, Talaton: Thomas, son of John Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss tenth and last child of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? Poss siblings: William (1718), Thomas (1721, d. before 1736?), Mary (1723), Sarah (poss d. before 1727), Sarah (possible duplication? 1726), John & Sarah (1727, Sarah poss d. before 1733?), Elizabeth (1731), Sarah (1733). Thomas poss m.1756 Anne Shepherd in Whimple?]

 

25 September, Littleham: Mary Branscom buried.[212]

 

28 December, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Elizabeth Brunscombe marries John Cook.[213]

 

Anti-Irish riots in London. Accusations that cheap Irish labour is taking the jobs of Londoners. The Tower of London Militia puts down the disturbances.

 

@1737

24 January, Sandford: Robert Brownscombe buried. [poss m.1698 Joan Carpenter. Children: Joan & Mary (1700), Elizabeth (1704-1706), Elizabeth (1709)]

 

27 March, St.Mary Steps, Exeter: Mary Branscombe, daughter of Joseph, baptised. (IGI) [cf: other children of "Joseph" baptised in St.Mary Steps about this time - Richard (1740), Samuel (1745), Charles (1749), Anne (1754)]

 

August: William Pearse sentenced by Devon Assizes to transportation to the American colonies.[214]

 

11 November, Morchard Bishop: Abraham, son of John Branscomb, christened. (IGI) [poss. m.1758 Frances Southcott of Morchard? d.1824 Morchard? John poss a sergemaker?]

 

Hugh Branscombe of Bampton makes his will.[215] [cf:1736, Petton (Bampton), Hugh Branscombe marries Elizabeth Hill. Also cf:1743, The will of Hugh Brownscombe of Bampton administered. Also cf:1692 & 1751, Hugh Brownscombe of Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?), buried]

 

North Molton: possible year of birth of Agnes Branscombe, m.1758, Jonathan Pasmore?

 

Sir Robert Walpole is Prime Minister. Samuel Johnson, and David Garrick, travel to London. Henry Fielding turns from the stage to the Bar, and the novel. Handel is composing his Messiah. Samuel Richardson is writing Pamela.

 

Chittlehampton: Thomas Branscombe marries Mary Gilford.[216] [cf:1731 - marriage of Thomas & Mary?]

 

Earl Kennedy papers note a marriage licence issued to Philip Branscombe, farmer of Woodbury, in this year.

 

@1738

6 January, Chittlehampton: Mary Branscombe, daughter of Agness, baptised. (IGI)

 

4 February, Dawlish: Robert Branscombe & Mary Dorson of Sandford marry. [cf:1739 for bp. & poss death of son Edward, Dawlish]

 

May: John Wesley experiences his "conversion".

 

18 June, St.Andrew's, Holborn: Sarah, daughter of William & Jane Branscomb of Saffron Hill, baptised.[217] [poss William, son of James & Sarah (Martin - m.1697 Stepney), bp.1707 St.Dunstan Stepney, m.1734 Jane Robinson, St.Mary Magdalene, Old Fish Street?]

 

24 July, Chittlehampton: Thomas Branscombe, son of Thomas & Mary, baptised. (IGI) [cf:1731 Thomas Branscombe m. Mary Gilford. Also cf:1740 possible brother William]

 

Captain Arthur Branscombe (flourished c1733-59) is commander of the sloop John (20 tons - built & registered in Newfoundland, 1737 - owned by Robert Haskell) on a voyage from San Locar to Barbados, with a cargo of Newfoundland fish, and salt.[218] [Arthur is master and owner of the sloop "Hope" (40 tons - five men), built 1728 in America, registered at Exmouth. `A sober man, well-acquainted with the Halifax coast.' He is said to be `of Topsham']

 

@1739

13 January: Henshaw Halsey Esquire of Gaddesden, dies. Charles Halsey, sixth son of Thomas and eldest surviving brother of Henshaw, inherits the estate.[219] [Charles d.1748]

 

3 March, Dawlish: Edward, son of Robert & Mary (Dorson of Sandford m.1738?) Branscombe, born. Baptised 6 March.[220] [poss d.16 March?]

 

16 March, Dawlish: Edward Branscombe buried.[221] [poss son of Robert & Mary?]

 

3 May, Ottery St.Mary: The Court Leet & Court Baron of the Hundred and Manor of Ottery St.Mary, held before Thomas Southcott, Steward. Thomas Branscombe is sworn in to serve as a juror. `At the beginning of the eighteenth century, the manor courts, having for the most part lost control over agricultural processes after the enclosure and partition of the common fields, found themselves responsible for much of the local government now (1913) performed by County & District Councils. The great increase in traffic throughout the land had drawn attention to the condition of the roads and bridges, and the old manorial courts struggled ineffectively either to discharge or to rid themselves of these constantly increasing demands on their resources - demands that had their origin in causes external to the interests of the localities affected thereby.'[222] [Thomas poss bp.1721 Talaton, son of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? cf:1745 Ottery, Peter, son of Thomas & Anne Branscombe, christened]

 

Admiral Vernon RN, captures the Caribbean port of Puerto Bello, probably inspiring the re-naming of a farm in North Kensington in an anglicized form: Portobello.

 

Branscombe family deeds for Drupe, Colaton Raleigh, 1614-1739. (EPNI) `Drupe Farm (now transformed into holiday cottages) was, in 1330, the home of William atte Thrope. In 1388 it was called Thorp and became Droope in 1679. The name is interesting in being the only example of the Old English Thorp (roughly, a dependent or outlying dairy farm belonging to a village or manor) which has been noted, in Devon.'[223]

 

Approximate year that Richard Branscombe of Brunswick County, Virginia, marries. [or 1744 - Sarah Proctor?]

 

Captain Arthur Branscombe (flourished c1733-59) is commander of the Hope on a voyage from Antigua to South Carolina.[224] [master and owner of the sloop "Hope" (40 tons - five men), built 1728 in America, registered at Exmouth. `A sober man, well-acquainted with the Halifax coast.' He is said to be `of Topsham']

 

Crediton: Fra Brounscomb marries Thos Lee. [225]

 

@1740

30 January, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): James Brunscombe baptised, son of James.[226] [James m. Jone Carpenter in Oakford, 1732. Other poss child: Bartholomew (1733). Jone d.1741]

 

9 February, Dawlish: Elizabeth Bromblocombe [Branscombe?] & (Richard? Cador?) marry.

 

12 February, Chittlehampton: William Branscombe, son of Thomas & Mary, baptised. (IGI) [cf:1731 Thomas Branscombe m. Mary Gilford. Also cf:1738 possible brother Thomas]

 

4 April, Dawlish: Mary Branscombe buried.[227] [wife of Robert?]

 

29 June, St.Mary Steps, Exeter: Richard Branscombe, son of Joseph, baptised. (IGI) [cf: other children of "Joseph" baptised in St.Mary Steps about this time - Mary (1737), Samuel (1745), Charles (1749), Anne (1754)]

 

6 July, Topsham: John Pearce marries Sarah Branscombe. [cf:Charles Pearse - plumber with premises in Fore Street, Exeter][228]

 

Martha Brownscombe, daughter of Mark, mason of Thorverton. (EPNI) [cf:1710, Mark, mason of Thorverton; Branscombe of Thorverton [mason?] makes his will. Also cf:1703, Newton St.Cyres;, Mark Branscombe marries helmore, Hanna Helmore. Mark Brownscombe's will administered in 1763]

 

Jethro Tull dies.

 

Approximate year of birth, poss Great Marlow, Bucks., of Bartholomew Branscomb, later tin-plate worker and Freeman of the City of London. [d.1806 aged 66, buried Great Marlow]

 

Arthur Branscombe of Topsham, a ship's captain who flourished in the Newfoundland trade 1740-60s, commanded a Bristol ship in these years and then settled in St.Johns in the mid 1750s. He is said to have been `of Topsham', the son of Simon Branscombe, a small merchant and ship's captain of Exmouth, Devon, and St.Johns. He seems to have been a small "planter" and captain/owner of small vessels. In 1757 he was described as a "sober man and well acquainted with the Halifax coast" when engaged as a pilot by Admiral Shelborne for his projected expedition against French Canada and Captain Breton.[229]

 

Pinhoe: Nicolas Braunscombe marries An Mathews.[230]

 

@1741

7 April, Littleham: Simon Branscom buried.[231]

 

18 May: Samuel Waymouth, apprentice of Abraham Gilberd [Gilbert?], druggist, admitted to the Freedom of the City of Exeter. He or other Samuel Waymouths held a lease of 196 High Street, as druggists, until 1814.[232]

 

26 May, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Jone Brunscombe buried, wife of James.[233] [prob Jone Carpenter, m.1732 Oakford. Poss children: Bartholomew (1733), James (1740)]

 

5 June, St.Marychurch, Tormoham: Mary Banstone [Branscombe?] buried. [died?]

 

8 June, Dawlish: Mary Banscome [Branscombe?] buried.

 

October: David Garrick first comes to public notice as Shakespeare's Richard III, at Goodman's Fields Theatre, Leman Street, London.

 

`So enormous was the acclaim for Garrick's performance, one observer commented that 'there are a dozen dukes of a night at Goodman's Fields, sometimes.' Throughout the winter of 1741-2, Garrick's presence ensured that this little East End theatre was the most fashionable place in town, much to the annoyance of the proprietors of Drury Lane and Covent Garden Theatre, who finally had their unlicenced rival closed down, in May 1742. It was never re-opened, but Garrick himself went on to find fame and considerable fortune, leaving an estate worth more than £100, 000.'[234]

 

`The opening of the Devon & Exeter Hospital, in 1741, was a great boon to rural parishes. We constantly read of Dawlish patients being conveyed to the hospital, usually on horse-back.'[235]

 

Bideford: William Brownscomb marries Sara Buckingham.[236] [cf:1723 Branscombe/Buckingham marriages in Crediton]

 

@1742

15 March, St.Mary Steps, Exeter: Josha Branscombe marries Elizabeth Davis. [237]

 

30 March, Thorverton: Joanna Brounscombe baptised.[238]

 

The underground "Chamber" at Royston discovered.

 

`The years of peace under Walpole, chief Minister between 1721 and 1742 [saw] a steady improvement in the standard of living, and this ... led to a greater demand for food, clothing and other commodities.'[239]

 

@1743

2 May: John Waymouth, apprentice of Peter Clarke, ironmonger, admitted to the Freedom of the City of Exeter.

 

Abraham Branscombe, rector, surrenders the living of Chawleigh, Devon (since 1732).[240] [cf:1723]

 

17 May, Chawleigh: Abraham Branscombe is buried.[241] His will is proved in 1745? [242]

 

17 July, St.Pancras, Exeter: Elizabeth, daughter of Isias Branscumb, christened. (IGI) [cf:1746, St.Pancras, William, son of Joseph, baptised]

 

 


            July: John Pearse reprieved (probably from death    sentence, or burning in the hand) by
Devon                           Assizes to 14 years' transportation to the                               American colonies.

            Thomas Branscombe, late of Morchard Bishop, an                insolvent debtor discharged from prison.

            Wm Jewell of Langford Bodwill,
Somerset, and                      (Nordon?) Mills, Bradninch, transported to                           America.[243]

 

 

Dawlish manorial records - miscellaneous volume of presentments, 1743-49.[244]

 

The will of Hugh Brownscombe of Bampton is administered.[245] [cf:1737, Hugh Branscombe of Bampton makes his will. Also cf:1736, Petton (Bampton), Hugh Branscombe marries Elizabeth Hill. Also cf:1692 & 1751, Hugh Brownscombe of Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?), buried]

 

John Wesley preaches for the first time at Axminster, where methodism was already long established, having been brought there by a soldier. From Axminster came the rash of small socities, including Branscombe, in the early nineteenth century.[246]

 

Approximate year of birth of John Branscomb, poss buried Benet Wharf, London, 1798, aged 55.[247]

 

Littleham: There is a gap in the baptism registers from 1705-1743, and in the burial registers from 1678-1743.[248]

 

Captain Arthur Branscombe is commander of the Sea Nymph of Bristol, on a voyage to Gibraltar and Port Mahon, in the Mediterranean. He is said to be `of Topsham'. He is still commanding this vessel, in 1744.[249]

 

Dawlish: Agn Brouncombe marries Rbt Tripe. [250]

 

@1744

3 February, Dawlish: Robert Branscombe & Sarah Voysey marry. [by banns] [251] [poss second marriage for Robert? cf:1740 Mary Branscombe buried]

 

17 May, St.Mary Steps, Exeter: Joshua Branscombe marries Mary Warfield. [252]

 

2 September, All Hallows-on-the-Walls, Exeter: Walter Branscombe, son of Joseph, baptised. (IGI)

 

Richard Branscomb of Virginia marries Sarah Proctor?

 

Captain Arthur Branscombe is commander of the Sea Nymph of Bristol, on a voyage to London from South Carolina. He is said to be `of Topsham'.[253]

 

@1745

Jacobite Rebellion (to 1746).

 

6 March, Ottery St.Mary: Peter, son of Thomas & Anne Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Thomas poss bp.1721 Talaton, son of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? Peter poss. marries 1767 Ottery St.Mary? Poss siblings: Elizabeth (1749), Sarah (1752)?]

 

14 May, Tiverton: Hannah Branscombe marries William Cummins. (IGI)

 

18 August, St.Mary Steps, Exeter: Samuel Branscombe, son of Joseph, baptised. [cf: other children of "Joseph" baptised in St.Mary Steps about this time - Mary (1737), Richard (1740), Charles (1749), Anne (1754)]

 

Abraham Bremscombe, clerk of Chawleigh, makes his will.[254] [poss. former rector of Chawleigh cf:1743]

 

Crediton: Jn Brounscomb marries My Bolt. [255]

 

@1746

16 April: Battle of Culloden. The quelling of the '45 rising. The King's forces, under his son, the Duke of Cumberland, against the army of Prince Charles, fighting for the Jacobites to re-establish Stuarts on the English throne. Charles lost, and escaped to France 5 months later. The Stuart cause, and the Highland clan society which had supported it, were lost forever. In a battle lasting around 40 minutes, 1200 Scots and 310 English died.

 

`By the eighteenth century, the word `discipline' covered the whole complex business of priming, loading, cocking, presenting and firing the `Brown Bess' infantry muskets to the beat of a drum, a ritual which if carried out perfectly, left British red-coats invulnerable to direct assault, as at Culloden, but when bungled left them, as an OED citation says, `fit only for the contempt and slaughter of their enemies', as at Falkirk the year before.'[256] 

 

29 June, St.Pancras, Exeter: William Branscumbe, son of Joseph, baptised. (IGI) [cf:1743 St.Pancras, Elizabeth, dtr of Isias, baptised]

 

"Black Friday". The day the Bank of England was nearly bankrupted.[257] 

 

The capture of Madras by Dupleix in 1746 began the struggle between Britain and France for India. As in America, British sea power proved decisive.[258]

 

Battle of Negapatam, Indian sub-continent.

 

Charles Halsey, sixth son of Thomas and holder of the estate of Great Gaddesden since 1739, is Sheriff of Hertfordshire.[259] [d.1748]

 

All Hallowes, Lombard Street, London: poss burial of Richard Branscomb? [260]

 

@1747

William Stith, History of The First Discovery and Settlement of Virginia, published.

 

17 February, St.Andrew's, Colyton: Ann, daughter of William & Sarah Branscombe, christened.[261] [no record of their marriage. Poss sibling Sarah (1751)]

 

11 March, Cheiton Fitzpaine: Anna, daughter of William Brownscombe, christened. (IGI)

 

21 April (IGI says 22nd), St.Benedict & St.Peter, Paul's Wharf, London: James Branscombe of St.Giles-in-the-Fields, Middlesex, bachelor, marries Elizabeth Heard of the same parish, spinster.[262] [poss bp. Elizabeth, first child, in Salcombe Regis, 1748? According to Miscellanea Genealogica et Heraldica, [263] James was of Exmouth and drowned before 1803. Elizabeth was born at Bridgewater 11 March 1726 & baptised there 24 March, the first child of John Heard of Bridgewater and Elizabeth Michell of Seaside, Branscombe. Elizabeth's brother (Sir) Isaac, was born at Ottery St.Mary (1730). James & Elizabeth had one child, Elizabeth, b. 20 May 1752. She married 13 February 1768 William Foster, who died after 1803. They were childless]

 

17 August, Boston Evening Post:

 

`Captain Branscombe, Boston from Oporto.'[264]

 

7 September, Boston Evening Post:

 

`Captain Branscombe, Boston from Newfoundland.'[265]

 

12 October, Boston Evening Post:

 

`Captain Branscombe cleared for Newfoundland.'[266]

 

16 September: Philip Branscombe makes his will.[267] [The will is proved in London, in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, on 1 July, 1752. Earl Kennedy papers note Philip was `of H.M. ship "Pembroke". The will was proved in the presence of his father, his sole heir and executor, Philip Branscombe of Colaton Raleigh. cf:1750 Philip Branscombe of Colaton Raleigh makes his will]

 

23 December, Dawlish: 5th great-grandfather Edward Brownscombe marries Elizabeth Pearse, by banns.[268] [Elizabeth poss bp.1725 Whitestone, daughter of Thomas, or bp.1722 Bishopsteignton, daughter of Peter & Mary? Children: Anne (1748), Robert (1750), Edward (1752), Elizabeth (1756)]

 

Ann Starling's great-aunt Mary Merrygame marries Thomas Fox. Mary Fox is a witness at Ann & Edward Branscombe's marriage, in 1817. Ann & Edward's fourth child, born in 1823, is called Thomas Fox Branscombe.

 

Lord Lovatt is beheaded on Tower Hill, for Jacobitism - the last execution on this site, in use since the fourteenth century. A stand holding 1000 spectators collapses.

 

Elizabeth Branscombe called "daughter" in Nathan White's will [Maine & New Hampshire].[269] [cf:1732 William Branscomb, ship's captain of New Castle, N.H., marries Elizabeth White]

 

Garrick begins 29 year reign as actor-manager at Drury Lane.[270]

 

Benjamin Robbins, mathematician & specialist in the principles of gunnery, delivers a pioneer paper on ballistics to the Royal Society.[271]

 

Approximate year of birth, according to burial age on headstone in Dawlish in 1824, of John Branscombe. [Poss marries Agnes Pike in 1781 in Dawlish. Poss father of John (1782-1795?), Captn. Joseph (1784-1866), Anne (1787-1787), Sarah (1790-1849), Catherine (1793-1855), John (1796), Anne (1798), Captn. William (1803)]

 

Crediton: My Brounscomb marries Wm Baker & Jn Brounscomb marries Sus Caunter. [272]

 

@1748

17 January, Dawlish: Richard Pearse marries Mary Borrow.[273]

 

March: Edward Pearse sentenced by Devonshire Assizes to transportation to the American colonies.[274]

 

6 April, nr Hempstead, Hertfordshire: Charles Halsey Esquire dies. `The rectory of Great Gaddesden having been granted in 1544/45 by Henry VIII to William Hawsé or Halsey, descended in that family and was in due course inherited by Charles Halsey in 1739, he being the sixth son of Thomas and eldest surviving brother of Henshaw Halsey, who previously held the estate. Charles was county Sheriff in 1746.'[275]

 

10 April, Dawlish: Mark Tapper marries Margaret Voysey.[276]

 

24 June, Morchard Bishop: John Brawnscomb buried.[277]

 

1 August, Salcombe Regis: Eliz, daughter of James & Eliz Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss m.1747 St.Benedict, Paul's Wharf, London?]

 

17 October, Dawlish: Anne Brownscombe, daughter of Edward & Elizabeth (Pearse - m.1747 Dawlish) born. Baptised on 29 October.[278] [Siblings: Robert (1750), Edward (1752), Elizabeth (1756)]

 

31 October, St.Mary Major, Exeter: Joshua Branscombe marries Jane Sanders. [279]

 

`The age of wide improvements on the roads is usually said to have begun with the spread of the turnpikes, after 1748.'

 

John Branscombe of Bampton makes his will.[280]

 

Tobias Smollett's first novel, The Adventures of Roderick Random, is published.[281]

 

Approximate year of birth of James Pearce, who died at Venbridge Farm, Kenton, in 1831.[282]

 

Chittlehampton: James Brownscombe marries Agnes Gould.[283]

 

Captain Arthur Branscombe is commander of the Portugal Merchant (100 tons, 14 men, 2 guns) of Bristol, on a voyage to Newfoundland and the Mediterranean from Liverpool. He is said to be `of Topsham'.[284]

 

@1749

February: Anson, at the Admiralty, reforms command structure of fleet, and issues new Fighting Instructions.[285]

 

27 March, Colaton Raleigh: Sarah Branscombe marries John Hellier. Over the next 20 years, they produce at least five children, the first in October 1749, the last on Boxing Day, 1769.[286] [cf:1799 Sarah Hellier]

 

24 April, Dawlish: John Beard, son of John & Joanna (Brooks), baptised. (IGI)

 

25 April, St.George's, Exeter: ?, daughter of Joseph Branscombe christened. (IGI)

 

27 April, Green Park, London: Handel's Music for the Royal Fireworks performed [for the first time?] at peace celebrations.[287]

 

May?: Henry Fielding publishes Tom Jones and becomes a Bow Street magistrate. He enlists help of 6 mobile `thief-takers', fore-runners of the police force. He is succeeded in 1754 by his half-brother John, who further develops the system of `Bow Street Runners'.[288]

 

7 May, St.Mary Steps, Exeter: Charles, son of Joseph Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss siblings: Mary (1737), Richard (1740), Samuel (1745), Anne (1754)]

 

8 May, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Agnes Brownscombe buried.[289] [poss Agnes Lake, m.1701 Oakford, Bartholomew. Prob children: Bartholmew (1701), James (1703), Andrew (1707)]

 

24 May, Ottery St.Mary: Elizabeth, daughter of Thomas & Anne Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Thomas poss bp.1721 Talaton, son of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? Poss siblings: Peter (1745), Sarah (1752)? Elizabeth poss m.1776 Ottery St.Mary?]

 

2 September, St.Paul's, Exeter: Elizabeth Branscombe marries Thomas Coster. (IGI)

 

Elias Newcomen, second son of Thomas [b.1663, Dartmouth - inventor of the first effective steam pump] & Hannah (née Waymouth), marries Hannah Waymouth, daughter of Samuel, druggist of Exeter.

 

The strategic port of Halifax, Nova Scotia, is founded by Britain as a counterweight to the French settlement and fort at Louisbourg.

 

@1750

3 January, Littleham: Elizabeth Branscomb, daughter of William Halse, baptised.[290] [cf:1752 Elizabeth Branscomb buried]

 

March, Brunswick County: Richard Branscombe applies for a land grant under the provisions of the Act of Assembly.

 

The order book for Brunswick County's Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions for March 1750 contains this statement (Book 6, p. 46):

 

Richard Branscomb made oath that about fourteen or fifteen years since he imported himself directly from the Kingdom of Great Britain into the Province of Maryland and from thence into this Colony where he served a part of his servitude and that this is the first time of his proving such Importation which is ordered to be certified.’

 

Fred Tubbs comments:

 

‘Other entries in the court records had similar wording for other individuals; they imply that a number of residents of Brunswick County had come to America as indentured servants. A resident of the British Isles who desired to emigrate to America but who lacked the means to pay for the voyage could sign an indenture with a ship's captain. The captain transported a group of such indentured servants to the New World and then sold their indentures at auction to pay his costs. The immigrant usually completed the servitude within three to five years. At that point the individual was eligible for clothing and tools as specified in the indenture and was also eligible for a patent of land—officially 50 acres, but the amount varied in practice. Richard Branscomb's sworn statement in court was necessary to “prove his importation” and thereby qualify him for a land patent.[291]

 

2 July, Dawlish: Fourth great-grandfather Robert Brownscombe, son of Edward & Elizabeth (Pearse - m.1747 Dawlish) born. Baptised Dawlish, 22 July.[292] [becomes father of our branch and William Waymouth's branch. Died, 1801. Siblings: Anne (1748), Edward (1752), Elizabeth (1756)]

 

27 September, St. John's, Newfoundland: Arthur Branscombe serves on the Grand Jury.[293]

 

`By 1750, the furnesses of the ironmasters were well-established near the woods of the Lake District around Workington and Furness, and in the wild, woody country of Shropshire and Hereford.'

 

`The beer called Porter emerged in the middle of the eighteenth century, and remained Britain's most popular ale until after the First World War, when drinkers' tastes shifted to bitter.'

 

Though Exeter was very prosperous throughout most of the [18th century], it is likely that the industrial towns and ports of the Midlands and the north were overtaking her both in wealth and population from about 1750 onwards.

 

Philip Branscombe of Colaton Raleigh makes his will.[294] [this is the last mention of Colaton Raleigh in connection with Branscombes. The first is 1614. cf:1752 the will of Phillip Branscombe is proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury]

 

`In 1750 most tools used by the farmer were made either locally by the village smith or carpenter or, in a cruder form, by the farmer himself.'[295]

 

Dodbrooke?: Approximate year of marriage of William Branscombe, founder of the Kingsbridge line, to Agnes C ? [children: Mary (1753), William (1755), James (1758), Richard (1759), Samuel (1761) - all bp. Dodbrooke]

 

Year of birth of Charles, one of at least five sons of ship's captain William Branscomb & Elizabeth (White - m.1732), possibly in New Castle, New Hampshire.[296] [d.1825. possibly served in the American Revolution]

 

Richard Branscomb emigrates to Maryland.[297]

 

Simon Branscomb, ship's captain of New Castle, New Hampshire, marries Elizabeth Sheafe.[298] [cf:1768 Antigua - Captain Simon Branskum buried? Will proved same year]

 

The manual chain ferry across the Exe at Exeter quay dates from this year.[299]

 

Philip Branscombe of Topsham, a "bye boat keeper" in St. Johns, Newfoundland inshore fishery, who migrated there annually, is said to have flourished in the 1750s.[300]

 

@1751

11 August, St. Andrew's, Colyton: Sarah Branscombe, daughter of William & Sarah, baptised.[301] [poss sibling Ann (1747)]

 

21 August, Bampton: William Branscombe aged 33, buried. His wife Sarah died in 1796.[302] [poss b. ABOUT 1724 Bampton/Tiverton? Poss father of William, Bartholomew & James?]

 

12 September, St. John's, Newfoundland: Arthur Branscombe serves on the Grand Jury.[303]

 

14 September, St. John's, Newfoundland: A letter to Arthur Branscombe states that £105 is due to Elizabeth Branscomb of Exmouth, Devon, from Arthur, as heir of his late father Arthur Branscomb.[304] [Earl Kennedy believes this is Arthur, b.1689 and his son Arthur, b.1718]

 

16 September, St. John's, Newfoundland: A petition of James Cawley, attorney to Elizabeth Branscomb of Exmouth, is presented in court. She is the widow and executrix of Simon Branscomb. She says Arthur is endebted to her in the sum of £105 owed by a bond to her late husband.[305] [Earl Kennedy believes Simon was Arthur senior's brother. He suggests Elizabeth was buried 1752, in Littleham]

 

Approximate year of death of Simon Branscombe of Exmouth, a small merchant and ship's captain who owned a fishing plantation in St. Johns, Newfoundland, and flourished 1700-1750. He had three sons, one of whom predeceased him, and two of whom may have had the same name, Arthur. Possibly the progenitor of the Newfoundland Branscombes?[306]

 

20 October, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Hugh Brownscombe buried.[307] [poss seventh child of Thomas m.1713 Oakford, & Sarah Webborn. Poss other children: William (1714), Thomas (1716-1728?), John (1719-1728?), Philip (1721), Zacharias (1722), Mary (1725-1752?). Thomas d. before 1768, poss in 1728? Or this could be Thomas junior, bp.1716. Sarah d.1768]

 

Approximate year Arthur Branscombe born, somewhere in England. (arrived America 1770 [308], fled to Canada in 1783, to Grand Lake, New Brunswick) [309] [cf:1718 Arthur, son of Arthur, bp.Littleham - poss father?]

 

W. Hogarth paints[?] Gin Lane; Beer Street; The Four Stages of Cruelty.[310]

 

Tobias Smollett publishes The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle.[311]

 

"I.C." carves their initials into the window surround at Edge.

 

St. John's, Newfoundland: approximate year of birth of William Branscombe, d.1829 January 20, St. John's.[312]

 

Approximate year of death of Arthur Branscombe, bp 1689 Littleham, lived in Newfoundland.[313]

 

@1752

23 February, St. George, Exeter: Elener Branscomb marries Joseph Guard. [314] [poss Eleanor bp.1729 East Budleigh, daughter of Philip & Eleanor? Siblings: Sarah (1724), Mary (1731), Samuel (1734)]

 

10 April, St. Mary’s, Callington: Thomas Branscombe m. Jane Holyday. [315]

 

22 April, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Mary Brownscombe buried.[316] [poss sixth child of Thomas m.1713 Oakford, & Sarah Webborn. Poss other children: William (1714), Thomas (1716-1728?), John (1719-1728?), Philip (1721), Zacharias (1722), Hugh (1727-1751?). Thomas d. before 1768, poss in 1728? Or this could be Thomas junior, bp.1716. Sarah d.1768]

 

20 May: Elizabeth Branscomb, only child of James of Exmouth & Elizabeth (Heard of Bridgewater - m.1747 London), born. James drowned before 1803 and was survived by his wife. Elizabeth junior m.1768 William Foster.[317]

 

24 June, Ottery St. Mary: Sarah Branscombe daughter of Thomas & Anne, baptised. (IGI) [Thomas poss bp.1721 Talaton, son of John & Ann (Mare - m.1717 Talaton)? Poss siblings: Peter (1745), Elizabeth (1749)?]

 

1 July London: The will of Philip Branscombe is proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, as he is of, or owns land in `parts beyond the seas'.[318] [Earl Kennedy papers note Philip was `of H.M. ship "Pembroke". The will was made on 16 September, 1747 and proved in the presence of his father, his sole heir and executor, Philip Branscombe of Colaton Raleigh. cf:1750 Philip Branscombe of Colaton Raleigh makes his will]

 

3 August, Aylesbeare, Devon: John Branscombe marries Elizabeth Perriman. (IGI) [poss children, all bp. Aylesbeare: William (1753), John (1756), Anne (1758). William poss m. Mary ?, and they baptise 2 daughters, Elizabeth & Susanna, in Aylesbeare, 1787]

 

23 August, Colyton: William Branscombe Farrant, son of Elizabeth Farrant, baptised. [cf:William & Sarah Branscombe in Colyton from at least 1747 to at least 1751. Also cf:1777 William Branscombe m. Mary Lang]

 

24 August, St. Sidwell's, Exeter: Andrew Branscombe marries Catherine Cooke, or Grinning. (IGI) [Andrew poss bp.1707 Oakford, son of Bartholomew & Agnes (Lake - m.1701 Oakford)?]

 

2-14 September: Until 1752, the year began in England & the American colonies on Lady Day, 25 March, not January 1st, in accordance with the Julian calendar named after Julius Caesar. By the time the more accurate Gregorian calendar of March 1582 was accepted by the government (the people had followed Pope Gregory XIII's ruling and adopted it nearly 200 years before, as was the case in all Catholic countries), the discrepancy between the calendars was 11 days. To resolve this, the government decreed that September 2 be followed by September 14. Some people added 11 days to the birth-dates of their children also, a fact which is not noted on the parish registers. `The second calendar change, of greater importance to genealogists, is that the commencement of this year was brought forward from 25 March to the preceding 1 January. This changed January, February and most of March from being the last months of the Old Year to the first of the New. As the new system had already been put into use by some people in advance of its official introduction, care has to be taken when transcribing documents of the pre-1752 period dated between 1 January and 24 March. The correct transcription procedure is to use both Old and New Reckonings, for example by copying `5 February 1626' as `5 February 1626/7'. The months of September, October, November and December, which used to be the seventh to tenth months of the year, are sometimes found abbreviated to the `7ber, 8ber, 9ber & 10ber' respectively, and must not be mistaken for the present seventh to tenth months, July to October.[319]

 

15 October, Littleham: Elizabeth Branscomb buried.[320] [poss wife of Arthur (Callard - m.1713) or their daughter, bp.1725 Littleham? OR Elizabeth, daughter of William Halse, bp.1750?]

 

16 October: Henry Waymouth, apprentice and son of Samuel Waymouth, tobacconist, admitted to the freedom of Exeter. [cf:1770]

 

1 December, Dawlish: Edward Brownscombe, son of Edward & Elizabeth (Pearse - m.1747 Dawlish) born. Baptised 22 December.[321] [d.1822? Siblings: Anne (1748), Robert (1750), Elizabeth (1756)]

 

24 December, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Philip Branscome, son of John & Eliz, baptised.[322]

 

The will of Joshua Branscombe of Exeter is administered.[323] [cf:1767 - Samuel Branscombe, blacksmith, son of Joshua Branscombe, becomes a freeman of the city of , by succession. Also cf:1708 Joshua Branscombe, locksmith, freeman of Exeter. Also cf:1844 Monkwearmouth, Sunderland - Samuel (James) Henry Branscomb, shipowner and master, son of Samuel, blacksmith, marries Mary Doubleday]

 

The attempts of the French to carve out a colonial possession in India are checked, when [General?] Dupleix is defeated by British forces at Trichinopoly.[324]

 

The will of William Bartlett, clerk, of Hole-in-Branscombe, is administered.

 

St. John's, Newfoundland: Arthur Branscombe is a juror in a case in which Anna Coffin is accused of murder.[325]

 

The will of William Branscombe of Doddiscombsleigh is made in the Principle Registry of the Bishop of Exeter.[326] [cf:1782 John]

 

@1753

A Summary, Historical & Political, of The First Planting of British Settlements in North America, by William Douglass, published in Boston.

 

5 January, Plymouth: John Sterling, aged 36, is the captain of a galley, John & Philip, of Plymouth, at the start of a three-year stint. He was born in (Gussan?), and his abode is Plymouth. Second mate on the vessel is James Sterling, aged 24, born in (Gussan?), and whose abode is there also.[327]

 

17 January, St. Martin's, Exeter: Joseph Mortimor, mariner of St. Nicholas [Shaldon] marries Elizabeth Lang of the same parish, by licence.[328] [parents of Charlotte, bp.1767, future wife of William Branscombe (bp.1765 Wolborough)]

 

22 March, Pilton [Barnstaple]: James Hunt marries Elizabeth Branscomb of Bishops Tawton.[329]

 

5 April: Foundation charter for the establishment of the British Museum.[330]

 

7 July, St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland: Mary Branscombe, daughter of Arthur and Elizabeth, baptised.[331] [poss siblings: William Roberts (1757 & 1758), Mary (1758)?]

 

8 July, Aylesbeare: William Branscombe, son of John & Elizabeth, baptised. (IGI) [poss first child of John & Elizabeth (Perriman - m.1752 Aylesbeare)? Poss siblings, all bp. Aylesbeare: John (1756), Anne (1758)]

 

22 July, Morchard Bishop: Thomas Branscombe buried.[332]

 

9 September, Dodbrooke: Mary, first child of William Braunscombe & Agnes (? - m. ABOUT 1750 Dodbrooke?), baptised.[333] [siblings: William (1755), James (1758), Richard (1759), Samuel (1761) - all bp. Dodbrooke]

 

27 October, St. Nicholas, Shaldon: Joseph, son of Joseph & Elizabeth Mortimor, baptised.[334] [brother of Charlotte, bp.1767, future wife of William Branscombe (bp.1765 Wolborough)]

 

Marriage Act ends marriage by unlicenced ministers and regularizes the calling of banns.[335]

 

Approximate year of birth of (Captn.) Philip Leigh junior, probably Dartmouth. [cf:1777]

 

@1754

3 March, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Bartholomew Brownscombe from Stoodley (Stoodleigh, nr. Bampton?) buried.[336] [poss b.1733 Oakford, first child of James & Jone (Carpenter - m.1732 Oakford)? Or poss m.1701 Oakford, Agnes Lake?, or poss their son, bp.1701 Oakford]

 

13 March St. John's Chapel, Stepney: Simon Branscombe, a bachelor aged 25 of St. John's parish, Wapping, marries Alice Stabman, a spinster aged 21 of St. George's, Stepney, by licence.[337] [possibly b.1728 Withycombe Raleigh, son of Arthur & Elizabeth?. Their child Elenor b.1755]

 

13 April, St. Mary Steps, Exeter: Anne, daughter of Joseph Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Poss siblings: Mary (1737), Richard (1740), Samuel (1745), Charles (1749)]

 

The Hardwicke Marriage Act causes a separate register to be kept, for marriages. The use of printed forms and the signing of the entry by both parties became compulsory.

 

Henry Fielding dies.

 

@1755

31 March, Cadeleigh [Tiverton]: Zacharias Branscombe marries Elizabeth Middleton. (IGI) [poss bp.1722 Oakford, fifth child of Thomas & Sarah (Webborn - m.1713 Oakford). Possible child of this marriage, Elizabeth, b.1758 Cheriton Fitzpaine?]

 

20 April, St. George-in-the-East, Stepney: Elenor, daughter of Simon & Alice Branscombe, baptised.[338] [Simon Branscombe of St. John's parish m. Alice Stabman, Stepney 1754]

 

23 April, Dawlish: Sarah Branscombe is buried.[339] [cf:1756]

 

27 April, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Jno Branscomb, son of Jonathon & Sussana, baptised.[340] [brother Richard bp.1759]

 

July 15, Dawlish: Sarah Branscombe buried? [cf:23 April above]

 

3 August, Crediton: Ann, daughter of Mark Brownscombe, christened. (IGI)

 

26 August, Morchard Bishop: Anne Branscombe, daughter of Hannah, buried.[341] [Hannah bp.1729, fourth child of John & (Elizabeth)?]

 

14 September, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Eliz Branscomb, daughter of Thomas & Hannah, baptised.[342]

 

20 October, Dodbrooke: William, second child of William Braunscombe & Agnes (? - m. ABOUT 1750 Dodbrooke?), baptised.[343] [siblings: Mary (1753), James (1758), Richard (1759), Samuel (1761) - all bp. Dodbrooke]

 

Of 2339 children received into care at the London Workhouse, Bishopsgate, in the five years since 1750, only 168 are still alive.

 

The will of James Brownscombe of Crediton is proved in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.[344]

 

Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language published.[345]

 

Approximate year of birth of Nicholas Branscombe, baker of Exeter? [cf:1775 - marriage to Elizabeth Harris]

 

Approximate year William Branscombe, grandfather of John Hinam Branscombe, is born, probably in Bampton, to William & (Sarah?). [William senior died, 1752]

 

@1756

5 January, Whimple: Thomas Branscombe marries Anne Shepherd. (IGI) [Thomas poss. bp.1721 or 1736, son of John & Anne (Mare, m.1717 Talaton)? Poss children: William (1757), Sarah (1759), Thomas (1761), Richard (1763), John (1765), Anne (1768), Robert (1770), Elizabeth (1772), Mary (1776)]

 

2 February, Plymouth: John Sterling, aged 36, is the captain of a galley, John & Philip, of Plymouth, at the end of a voyage from Leghorn. He was born in (Gussan?), and his abode is Plymouth. Second mate on the vessel is James Sterling, aged 24, born in (Gussan?), and whose abode is there also. The two have been serving on the same ship for three years, since 5 January 1753.[346]

 

2 March, Aylesbeare, Devon: John, son of John & Eliz Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss second child of John & Elizabeth (Perriman - m.1752 Aylesbeare)? Poss siblings, all bp. Aylesbeare: William (1753), Anne (1758)]

 

23 April, Dawlish: Sarah Branscombe buried. [cf:1755, 23 April - duplication?]

 

17 September, Plymouth: The snow Lyon of Plymouth, master Henry Adlam, departs on a voyage from Fowey to Naples. Second mate is James Sterling, late of the John & Phillip (sic).[347] [cf: 2 February]

 

19 October, Broadhempston, Devon: Philip, son of Philip Pearse & Grace (Grant - m. 22 May 1743 Broadhempston), baptised. He marries Mary Nichols in Broadhempston, 17 June 1779. They have eight, possibly nine children: Grace (1779), Letitia (1782), Philip (1784), William (1787), Thomas (1789), William (1791), Jenkin (1793), Thomas (1795), ?Elizabeth (1803).[348] [cf:1713]

 

13 November, Dawlish: Elizabeth Branscombe, daughter of Edward & Elizabeth (Pearse - m.1747 Dawlish) born. Baptised, St. Gregory's, 28 November.[349] [Siblings: Anne (1748), Robert (1750), Edward (1752)]

 

@1757

16 January, Whimple: William, first child of Thomas & Ann (Shepherd - m.1756 Whimple) Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Thomas poss. bp.1721 or 1736, son of John & Anne Mare of Talaton m.1717? Poss siblings: Sarah (1759), Thomas (1761), Richard (1763), John (1765), Anne (1768), Robert (1770), Elizabeth (1772), Mary (1776)]

 

3 March, St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland: William Roberts Brunscomb, son of Arthur and Elizabeth, baptised by Edward Longman.[350] [poss d.1758, when another William Roberts baptised. Also cf:1758 and 1753, poss siblings Mary]

 

10 March, St. Mary’s, Callington: Mary Branscombe buried. [351]

 

10 May, Plymouth: James Sterling, discharged as mate from the snow Lyon of Plymouth, Henry Adlam, master.[352] [cf:1756]

 

6 June, Clyst St. George: William Branscomb of Clyst St. George, marries Elizabeth Chapple, widow, also of Clyst, by licence. Witnesses: Katherine & John Baker.[353] [These witnesses appear on many of the parish marriage records. William & Elizabeth may have had just one child, William, bp.1762 Clyst. A William d.1790 Clyst. An Elizabeth d.1762 Clyst, and was buried on the same day William junior was baptised. William Branscombe and John Baker witnessed the June 1762 marriage of Richard Westcott and Hannah Suxpitch]

 

6 June, Cheshire: William Branscornd. [IGI93 notes: relation of Frederick William Chappell]

 

10 July, Cheriton Fitzpaine: Elizabeth, daughter of William Branscombe, christened. (IGI)

 

`The Militia was established in 1757 [Militia Bill], and the Napoleonic Wars caused a great number of men to be drawn for the Militia. Persons drawn who were unwilling to serve, had to get a substitute; it appears that most people of note in Dawlish obtained, or tried to obtain, substitutes. In a great number of cases, substitutes had to be got from other parishes.'[354] [cf:1758]

 

The will of William Branscombe of Bampton is administered.[355]

 

After the capture of Bengal in 1757, the British could reinforce the Canartic region of the Indian sub-continent, at will. The capture of Madras by Dupleix in 1746 had threatened the establishment of a new French colony there. British naval superiority against the French forces was largely responsible for preventing it.[356]

 

James, Lord de Saumerez, later Captain , then Admiral, born Guernsey.

 

Arthur Branscombe of Topsham, a ship's captain who flourished in the Newfoundland trade 1740-60s, commanded a Bristol ship in these years and then settled in St. Johns in the mid 1750s. He is said to have been the son of Simon Branscombe, a small merchant and ship's captain of Exmouth, Devon, and St. Johns. He seems to have been a small "planter" and captain/owner of small vessels. In 1757 he was described as a "sober man and well acquainted with the Halifax coast" when engaged as a pilot by Admiral Shelborne for his projected expedition against French Canada and Captain Breton.[357]

 

Arthur Branscombe of St. John's, Newfoundland (probably the son of the above), is commander of the schooner Surprise, carrying a load of ordnance from St. John's to Ferryland. He is also involved in a court case. In 1752, he obtained a loan from two merchants, John Noble and Richard Newman, to build a small vessel. He refused to pay, complaining of overcharges for supplies. They then had the ship sold at auction and bought it themselves. He complained he had spent a considerable amount of his own money fitting her out, and asked that the case be decided by arbitration.[358]

 

@1758

6 February, North Molton: Agnes Branscombe marries Jonathan Pasmore. (IGI) [Agnes poss b. circa 1737, North Molton?]

 

26 March, Dodbrooke: James, third child of William Braunscombe & Agnes (? - m. ABOUT 1750 Dodbrooke?), baptised.[359] [siblings: Mary (1753), William (1755), Richard (1759), Samuel (1761) - all bp. Dodbrooke]

 

11 April, St. Gregory's, Dawlish: Robert Branscombe, husbandman, marries Joan Trimlett (widow?)[360] [IGI says this marriage was 6 April. Joan d.1779?]

 

12 April, Aylesbeare: Anne, daughter of John & Elizabeth Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss third child of John & Elizabeth (Perriman - m.1752 Aylesbeare)? Poss siblings, all bp. Aylesbeare: William (1753), John (1756). cf:1787 for next Aylesbeare ref. Susanna, daughter of William & Mary Branscombe, christened]

 

15 May, Wolborough Street Salem Chapel (independent), Newton Abbot: Samuel Branscombe, sojourner, marries Elizabeth Shapley of Wolborough (by banns?).[361] [Samuel poss marries second wife, Mary Call in 1772, the year Elizabeth dies? And/or possibly marries third wife Ann Quick, 1775? children of this marriage: John (1760-1828?), Samuel (1764), William (1765), Richard (1767-1771)]

 

18 June, Cheriton Fitzpaine: Elizabeth Branscome, daughter of Zachery, christened. (IGI) [possibly Zacharias (b.1722 Oakford) & Elizabeth (Middleton - m.1755 Cadeleigh)?]

 

25 June, Whitestone: James Hexter, son of Emanuel & Thomazin, is baptised.[362]

 

27 June, Topsham: Ann Branscombe, widow of Topsham parish, marries Norrilurau Polman, gentleman, also of Topsham, by licence. Norrilurau signs with a mark. Ann may also sign with a mark, but there are two scrawled signatures; Ann Polnam and Ann Brons...? Witnesses are Samuel Morriss and Elizabeth Southcott.[363]

 

August, St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland: William Roberts Branscombe buried.[364]

 

30 August, St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland: William Roberts Brunscomb, son of Arthur and Elizabeth.[365] [cf:1757 another William Roberts baptised. Also cf:1758 and 1753, poss siblings Mary]

 

3 September, Morchard Bishop: Elizabeth Brancom, widow, buried.[366]

 

22 September, St. Nicholas, Shaldon: John Mortimor, son of Joseph & Elizabeth, is baptised.[367] [brother of Charlotte, bp.1767, future wife of William Branscombe (bp.1765 Wolborough)]

 

7 December, St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland: Mary Brunscomb, daughter of Arthur and Elizabeth, baptised by Edward Longman.[368] [cf:1757 and 1758, poss siblings William Roberts baptised. Also cf:1753, another Mary baptised. Mary marries George Davis, merchant of Carbonear (NFL), Poole and London.[369] George's first wife, Elizabeth, was murdered (possibly by George himself) in 1779. Mary dies in 1836. Ancestor of Earl Kennedy]

 

27 December, Morchard Bishop: Abraham Branscombe of East Worlington marries Francis Southcot [Frances Southcott] by banns. Witnesses are William Southcott, Thomas Gotham and Peter Tucker [who witnesses many marriages here up to at least 1790].[370] [Marjorie Thomas says this marriage took place in West Worlington.[371] Also cf:1737. Poss first child William bp.1759 East Worlington?]

 

The Militia Bill of 1757 is amended to allow militia captains to accept volunteers instead of the ordinary militiamen who were compulsorily furnished pro rata by each parish. Parishes balloted for men to serve for three years in the Militia, but those who were chosen could pay someone else to serve for them. This happened quite frequently and indeed the substitute might only serve a year and then get someone else to substitute for him. They travelled about the country as any Army regiment might do, but they did not serve outside the British Isles. A man could transfer to the regular army, if he thought the life suited him.[372]

 

Frederick Halsey of Great Gaddesden, deceased, eldest brother to the present member for the county, listed in The Gentleman's Magazine as a former member of the Royston Club.[373]

 

@1759

16 January: Public first admitted to the British Museum.[374]

 

James expels the French from Quebec, but dies in the hour of victory.

 

Captain James serves at Quebec under Sir Charles Commander of the Fleet.

 

18 February, Whimple: Sarah Branscombe, second child of Thomas & Ann (Shepherd - m.1756 Whimple), baptised. (IGI) [Thomas poss. bp.1721 or 1736, son of John & Anne Mare of Talaton m.1717? Poss siblings: William (1757), Thomas (1761), Richard (1763), John (1765), Anne (1768), Robert (1770), Elizabeth (1772), Mary (1776)]

 

3 June, Talaton: William, son of Mary Branscombe, christened. (IGI)

 

13 June, St. George, Middlesex: Alice Branskum marries James Johnson of Wapping.[375]

 

3 August, Dodbrooke: Richard, fourth child of William Braunscombe & Agnes (? - m. ABOUT 1750 Dodbrooke?), baptised.[376] [siblings: Mary (1753), William (1755), James (1758), Samuel (1761) - all bp. Dodbrooke]

 

George Frederick dies. [b.1685]

 

4 October, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Richard Branscomb, son of Jonathon & Susanna, baptised.[377] [brother Jno bp.1755]

 

13 November, East Worlington: William Branscombe, son of Abraham, baptised. (IGI) [possibly first child of Abraham & Frances (Southcott - m.1758 Morchard Bishop)?]

 

5 December, Clyst St. George: Thomas Suxpitch buried.[378]

 

@1760

25 January, East Budleigh: Thomas Branscombe of Whimple marries Charity Lacy, by licence.[379]

 

18 February, Wolborough Street Salem Chapel (Independent), Newton Abbot: John, first child of Samuel & Elizabeth (Shapley - m.1758 Newton Abbot, d.1772 Highweek) Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [John m.1787 Mary Mountstephen? buried 1828 Highweek? siblings: Samuel (1764), William (1765), Richard (1767-1771)]

 

7 April, Farringdon: Mary Branscomb marries William Shorland. (IGI)

 

7 April, Tiverton: Ann Brownscombe marries John Oxenham. (IGI)

 

20 August, St. Nicholas, Shaldon: William, son of Joseph & Elizabeth Mortimor [Mortimer?], baptised.[380] [brother of Charlotte, bp.1767, future wife of William Branscombe (bp.1765 Wolborough)]

 

25 October, Kensington: King monarchsGeorge II dies. (reigned since 1727). monarchsHis grandson George III ascends the throne (to 1820).

 

britainWheat prices in Britain rise.

 

The British win control of east India.

 

`Of the 50 years after 1760, more than half are, for Britain, years of war.'

 

Approximate year of birth, Agnes Pike, later wife of John Branscombe. [m.1781 Dawlish, d.1836]

 

Elizabeth Branscombe called "cousin" in Margaret Reed's will, widow of Hugh Reed [Maine & New Hampshire].[381]

 

The will of John Branscombe, of Callington, proved in the Archdeaconry of Cornwall.[382] [poss m.1719 Plymouth St Andrew’s, Mary Harris? Poss children: John (1720), Richard, (1722), Thomas (1728)?]

 

The will of John Brownscombe of Bampton is administered.[383]

 

Joseph Massie publishes a broadsheet entitled: A Computation of the Money that hath been exorbitantly Raised upon the People of Great Britain by the Sugar Planters, in One Year from January 1759 to January 1760; shewing how much Money a Family of each Rank, Degree or Class hath lost by that rapacious monopoly ... Leaving aside the polemic which is its main reason for being, it contains important statistics for the population of Britain which are thought to be reasonably accurate, a full forty years before the first census. `If we multiply Massie's 1, 471, 600 families by four and a half, which is thought to be the size of the average family at that time, we get a figure for the population of England and Wales in 1760 of 6.6 million, and this is confirmed by modern estimates, which all range between 6.5 and 6.7 million ... it was a poor society, as one would expect when almost everything had to be made by hand and manhandled to its destination with only the help of wind and horse. The national income he estimated at £60.9 million, which was only £47 6s per family, or about £9 10s per head a year ... yet by the standards of that time England, if not Scotland, Wales or Ireland, was a rich country, and the average income was somewhat higher than those of Holland and France, the next richest, and far higher than the countries of southern and eastern Europe ... But the national wealth was not shared out equally ... there was an enormous difference in wealth between the ruling few and the many poor. At the top there were the aristocracy and gentry, a tiny class of landlords, 18, 070 families, scarcely more than one in a hundred (1.2%) who shared according to Massie, one seventh of the national income (14.3%). At the bottom the mass of the `lower orders' or `labouring poor', nearly three fifths of the population (866, 000 families, 58.9%), shared little more than a quarter of the income (25.7%). But in other European countries this bottom layer, though constituted rather differently, of subsistance peasant farmers rather than mainly landless labourers, would have been much larger - three quarters of the population in France, four fifths in most of eastern Europe, nine tenths or more in Russia - and even poorer. The great difference in England was the size and prosperity of the `middle ranks', the two fifths of Massie's families (587, 500, 39.9%), who received no less than three fifths of the national income (60%) [on the above figures, a landless labourer's family might be expected to receive an annual income of around £27 7s, or about £6 5s a week] ... Perhaps the most striking result of the growth of landless labour, however, and the most striking thing about Massie's estimate, is the large proportion of the population not primarily employed in agriculture. Even though most people in that old society were never far from the land, and most industrial wokers still turned out to help bring in the harvest, it is a remarkable fact that, when we have allocated half the general labourers to agriculture, according to Massie, more than half the population (52%) earned their living primarily from industry, trade, and the professions. If his guess is anywhere near the truth, it must have been the first time in any country that non-agricultural surpassed agricultural pursuits. That a well-informed observer should believe such a thing is a measure of how far England had progressed in industry and commerce before the onset of the Industrial Revolution. Agriculture, nevertheless, was still by far the single biggest single occupation, and most of the industries were closely based on it, notably the textile industries, bewing, flour-milling, leather goods, and many more. Prosperity and poverty ebbed and flowed with the seasons and the changing harvest, so that in winter and spring, everyone lived harder and most went hungrier than in summer and autumn, and a bad harvest meant not only high bread prices but less to spend on manufactured goods and so less work for the industrialists and their workers. In other words, a bad harvest meant a slump in trade and industry, and a good harvest meant a boom. Thus, in spite of considerable industrial progress, England in 1760 was still very much in the old pre-industrial world where men were the passive dependants on the whims of the climate and the niggardliness of nature.'[384]

 

Approximate year (Sir) James Branscombe commences as a lottery office-keeper, according to the obituary in The Gentleman's Magazine, December 1809.

 

@1761

8 February, Dawlish: George, son of John & Hannah Beard, baptised. (IGI)

 

1 March, Whimple: Thomas Branscombe, third child of Thomas & Anne (Shepherd - m.1756 Whimple), baptised. (IGI) [Thomas senior poss. bp.1721 or 1736, son of John & Anne Mare of Talaton m.1717? Poss siblings: William (1757), Sarah (1759), Richard (1763), John (1765), Anne (1768), Robert (1770), Elizabeth (1772), Mary (1776)]

 

17 April, Tiverton: James, son of Bartholomew & Elizabeth Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss siblings: Betty (1763), Mary (1766), Sarah (1768). James poss m.1785 Tiverton, Rachel Andrews?]

 

23 August, Dodbrooke: Samuel, son of William Braunscombe & Agnes (? - m. ABOUT 1750 Dodbrooke?), baptised.[385] [siblings: Mary (1753), William (1755), James (1758), Richard (1759) - all bp. Dodbrooke]

 

24 October, St. Nicholas, Shaldon: Mary, daughter of Joseph & Elizabeth Mortimor [Mortimer?], baptised.[386] [buried the same month. Sister of Charlotte, bp.1767, future wife of William Branscombe (bp.1765 Wolborough)]

 

The capture of Pondicherry [by Eyre Coote, after a four-month seige] ... destroyed French power on the Indian sub-continent. With established control of vital ports and large sections of the interior, the British were able to fight off all subsequent challenges.[387]

 

First Bridgewater Canal opened.[388]

 

@1762

21 March, Clyst St. George: Elizabeth Branscomb buried. William, son of William and Elizabeth Branscomb, baptised. (Nicholas Roe, Rector)[389] [poss William & Elizabeth (Chapple - m.1757 Clyst? This may have been their only son and Elizabeth may have died in childbirth?]

 

13 April, Morchard Bishop: Joseph, first or second child [cf:1759] of Abraham [serge-weaver] & Frances (Southcott - m.1758) Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss m.1785 Christian Morrish. Joseph poss m. Frances Horwell after Christian d.1810?]

 

7 June, Clyst St. George: Marriage of Richard Westcott & Hannah Suxpitch, both of Clyst. Witnesses: W. Branscombe & John Baker.[390] [Baker appears regularly as a marriage witness. cf:1720 Grace Branscombe m. Thomas Suxpitch, Exeter]

 

25 June, New Hampshire: Letters of Administration granted to Mary Mallam, widow of Hugh. William & Simon Branscomb, mariners of New Castle, New Hampshire, are sureties for Mary.[391] [cf:1763]

 

12 September, Boston Evening Post:

 

`Captain Branscombe arrived in Boston from Newfoundland in a sloop with 78 people. Left 12 August with provisions for a week, but got more at Ferryland. Confirms inhumanity of French, and other things.'[392]

 

28 November, Plympton St. Mary: Anthony Beard, ropemaker of East Stonehouse, marries Betty Skinner by licence and bond of £200 to Thomas Skinner (poss Betty's father?). Children: Thomas (bp. 2 June 1765), Anthony (bp. 15 October 1766 - buried Plymstock, 21 September 1780), James Skinner (bp. 2 September 1768), William Skinner (bp. 17 April 1770 - buried Plymstock, 20 April 1776), Betty Skinner (bp.27 December 1771 - buried Plymstock 15 March 1772, Richard Bowden (bp. 7 March 1773 - became a pioneering photographer), all born in East Stonehouse. The last child, John Beard, was born in Devonport about 1775, married in Portsea, Hants., 24 July 1797 Anne Pilbram, died Portsea 7 March 1831. Anthony Beard senior died at Plymstock 23 January 1780.[393]

 

26 December, Clyst St. George: Banns of marriage between John Taylor Branscomb [bp.1731?], of Clyst St. George, and Sarah Howell of Woodbury.[394] [married, January 1763, Woodbury]

 

Approximate year that Robert Branscombe [direct ancestor], aged 12, begins work as a common sailor on merchant vessels.

 

`Water transport, whether on natural or artificial navigations, was enormously cheaper than land. As Adam Smith pointed out, `Six or eight men ... by the help of water- carriage, can carry and bring back in the same time the same quantity of goods between London and Edinburgh, as fifty broad-wheeled waggons, attended by a hundred men, and drawn by four hundred horses.''[395]

 

@1763

20 January, Woodbury, Devon: John [Taylor] Branscombe marries Sarah Howel (IGI) [banns published in John's parish, Clyst St. George, December 1762]

 

6 March, Whimple: Richard, fourth child of Thomas & Anne (Shepherd - m.1756 Whimple) Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Thomas poss. bp.1721 or 1736, son of John & Anne Mare of Talaton m.1717? Poss siblings: William (1757), Sarah (1759), Thomas (1761), John (1765), Anne (1768), Robert (1770), Elizabeth (1772), Mary (1776)]

 

7 March, Wolborough Street Salem Chapel (independent), Newton Abbot: Samuel, son of Samuel & Eliz Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss second child of Samuel & Elizabeth (Shapley - m.1758 Newton Abbot, d.1772 Highweek). Siblings: John (1760-1828?), Samuel (1764), William (1765), Richard (1767-1771)]

 

3 April, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): James Brownscombe buried.[396] [poss b.1740 Oakford, second child of James & Jone (Carpenter - m.1732 Oakford), or could be James senior?]

 

28 April, New Hampshire: William Branscomb, mariner of New Castle, New Hampshire, is surety in the estate of Daniel O'Shaw.[397] [cf:1762 & Sept 1763]

 

30 May, Tiverton: Betty, daughter of Bartholomew & Betty Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Elizabeth? Poss siblings: James (1761), Mary (1766), Sarah (1768)]

 

12 June, Morchard Bishop: Joseph Branscombe buried.[398]

 

The will of Joseph Branscombe of Morchard Bishop is proved in the Consistory Court of the Bishop of Exeter.[399]

 

7 August, St. Anne, Soho: Frediswed Branscomb marries John Maclane. (IGI) [eldest daughter of John Branscomb senior of Great Marlow, Bucks., & Frediswed Bruere of London, daughter of George Bruere senior, M.P., & Frediswed Morris. John Macklane of London was a cabinet-maker. John Branscomb & Frediswed (Bruere) had seven children, of whom three were still alive on 31 May 1789: Bartholomew, Frediswed (MacLane) & Betty. Bartholomew was a tin-plate worker and a freeman of the City of London. He married Mrs.Barrett, a niece of Mrs. Barney of great Marlow, 23 April 1784. Betty was still single on 31 May 1789. Frediswed & John (MacLane) had six children living on 31 May 1789: Frediswed, William, John Phillip, James, George and Maria Ann (b. circa 1783)]

 

27 September, New Hampshire: Captains William & Simon Branscombe granted land in the newly-formed township of Topsham.[400] [cf:1764. Also 1768 Antigua - Captain Simon Branskum buried?]

 

East Budleigh: Sarah Elliott bound as apprentice to Thomas Brownscombe.[401] [cf:1764 - Thomas Branscombe, 1771 - Elizabeth Branscombe m. Thomas Elliott in Topsham]

 

Withycombe Raleigh?: Approximate year of birth of Sarah Haymen [d.1843], who marries William Branscombe in 1793 and becomes grandmother of William Branscombe, tinsmith of Mudgee.[402]

 

Seven Years' War; ends; the British britainAdmiralty de-commissions many vessels.

 

The Treaty of Paris. England is now the dominant world power: `For the first time it could be said that the sun never set on the British britainEmpire.'

 

`The empire could be said to owe its existence largely to Britain's britainmastery of the sea'

 

Edward of Shrivenham draws up a map of manorial lands and properties owned by the Goddard family, in and around Swindon. Goddard, Lord of the Manor, lived at Swindon swindon - House, and was the M.P. for north Wiltshire.

 

The will of Mark Brownscombe of Tiverton is administered.[403] [cf:1740, Martha Brownscombe, daughter of Mark, mason of Thorverton. Also cf:1710, Mark, mason of Thorverton; Branscombe of Thorverton [mason?] makes his will. Also cf:1703, Newton St. Cyres;, Mark Branscombe marries helmore, Hanna Helmore]

 

The will of Thomas Branscombe of Bishopsteignton is proved.[404]

 

@1764

20 February, Wolborough Street Salem Chapel (independent), Newton Abbot: Samuel Branscombe, second child of Samuel & Elizabeth (Shapley - m.1758 Newton Abbot, d.1772 Highweek), baptised. (IGI) [siblings: John (1760-1828?), Samuel (1763), William (1765), Richard (1767-1771)]

 

10 May, Morchard Bishop: Hannah Branscombe, widow, buried.[405] [cf:1766]

 

29 May, Morchard Bishop: John, second or third child of Abraham Branscombe & Frances (Southcott - m.1758), christened. (IGI) [cf:1759]

 

Dawlish parish records

`Paid for Charity Painter for bringing from the hospital and for the lent of wheels to draw her on ... 5s 6d'.
[406]

15 August, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Ann Branscomb, daughter of John & Ann, baptised.[407] [poss siblings: Elizabeth (1767), Richard (1772)?]

 

19 August, St. Nicholas, Shaldon: Mary, daughter of Joseph & Elizabeth Mortimor [Mortimer?], baptised.[408] [sister of Charlotte, bp.1767, future wife of William Branscombe (bp.1765 Wolborough)]

 

23 September, Woodbury, Devon: Peter Brandscombe, son of Hannah, is baptised. (IGI)

 

22 November, St. Nicholas, Shaldon: Charlotte, daughter of Joseph & Elizabeth Mortimor, baptised.[409] [future wife of William Branscombe (bp.1765 Newton Abbot)]

 

Captain William [from New Castle, New Hampshire, m.1732 Elizabeth White] & Charles Branscomb move into Hampton [Maine & New Hampshire].[410] [cf:1763, 1769. According to Cletie Elroy Branscome, Charles was probably William's son, born 1750][411] [poss Arthur Branscomb of Newmarket, & Durham N.H. born at about this time. Married Mary Hill. They possibly had at least four children. Arthur died 1792?]

 

30 November, Hampton, New Hampshire: Captain William Branscombe, pilot of the ship St George, shipwrecked:

 

For a long series of years even till the Revolution, the sovereigns of

England claimed exclusive right to every white pine tree in New Hampshire

and elsewhere, fit for a mast for the service of the royal navy. Such

trees, growing outside the townships granted before the 21st of September,

1722, were branded with the "broad arrow," and no man might dare cut them

down, even on his own land, under heavy penalty. Large ships brought to

our shores goods we were forbidden to provide for ourselves, and carried

away cargoes of our best pines. What wonder then, that, as the exactions

of England grew more and more rigorous, a "mast ship" became a hated

object!

 

Such a ship, with a valuable cargo, was wrecked on Hampton beach on the

night of November 30, 1764, not, it is believed, on account of rough

weather, but owing to the pilot's ignorance of the coast. The ship drove

on to the sands a little to the south of the present line of fish-houses

on the north beach, whence the crew, without much difficulty, go ashore.

The pilot, Capt. Willliam Branscomb, afterward settled in this town, and

became the third husband of Prudence Page (nicknamed "Old Prue").[412]

 

East Budleigh: Thomas Branscombe is paid by Joanna Teed to act on her behalf in the position of Overseer of the Poor.[413] [cf:1763]

 

Approximate year of birth, possibly in East Buckland, of Edward Branscombe, d.1827 East Buckland, aged 68. Poss also winner of Clerk's Award, East Buckland, 1821?

 

Earl Kennedy says George Davis of Poole and Newfoundland, corresponded with Captain James Cook, in this year.

 

@1765

9 March, Deptford:H.M.S. Invincible launched. A third rate, 74-gunner. (Robert Branscombe was to serve on.)

 

30 April, Littleham: Eleanor Branscomb, spinster, marries Thomas Caperl by banns. Both of this parish. Witnesses Robert Howard and John Baker.[414] [poss Eleanor bp.1729 East Budleigh, daughter of Philip & Eleanor? Siblings: Sarah (1724), Mary (1731), Samuel (1734)]

 

14 July, Whimple: John, fifth child of Thomas Branscombe & Ann (Shepherd - m.1756 Whimple), christened. (IGI) [poss. m.1791 Alice Mitchell, at Broad Clyst, then settled in Whimple? Thomas poss. bp.1721 or 1736, son of John & Anne (Mare, of Talaton m.1717)? Poss siblings: William (1757), Sarah (1759), Thomas (1761), Richard (1763), Anne (1768), Robert (1770), Elizabeth (1772), Mary (1776). John & Alice's poss children: Mary Ann (1793), Alice (1795), Betty (1798), William (1801), Thomas (1803), Petronella/Peternella (1806), Henry (1808), Sarah (1811), all bp. Whimple]

 

23 July, Wolborough Street Independent Salem Chapel, Newton Abbot: William Branscombe, third child of Samuel & Elizabeth (Shapley - m.1758 Newton Abbot, d.1772 Highweek), baptised. (IGI) [siblings: John (1760-1828?), Samuel (1764), Richard (1767-1771)]

 

11 September, Ottery Saint Mary: Agnes Branscombe marries parsons, John Parsons. (IGI) [cf:1752 for last Ottery ref]

 

24 September, Week Street Independent, Maidstone, Kent: Margarett, daughter of Thomas & Mary Brantcomb, baptised. (IGI) [cf:1767 Canterbury, Kent - Betty Branscomb, daughter of Jonathan & Catharine, christened. Also cf:1793 Leigh, Kent - William Branscomb m. Rachel Lucas]

 

@1766

16 January, Plymouth: Maynard Sparkes, aged 25, master of the Mary, of Plymouth on a voyage from Fareham. He has been with the same ship since at least 22 December 1764.[415]

 

2 April, Morchard Bishop: Abraham Branscombe and William Mortemer [Mortimer?] witness the marriage of Roger Western and Catherine Webber (widow).[416]

 

2 April: Richard Bingham of Melcombe Regis marries Miss Sophia Halsey of Great Gaddesden.[417]

 

25 April, Tiverton: Mary Branscombe, daughter of Bartholomew & Eliz, baptised. (IGI) [poss siblings: James (1761), Betty (1763), Sarah (1768)]

 

2 June, Morchard Bishop: Hannah Branscombe buried.[418] [cf:1764 - fourth child of John & (Elizabeth?), bp.1729?]

 

31 July, Honiton: The English Food Riots of 1766 begin in Devon. `On the thirty-first, it was reported that the poor had risen near Honiton, seized the farmers' wheat and sold it in the market for 5s 6d a bushel (the current price being around 7s), "paying the money and returning the bags to the owners." Disturbances followed at Crediton, Ottery, Tipton and Sidbury, where mills were destroyed and damage done to the value £1000. Flour mills were burnt down at Exeter and Stoke. To check the riots, it was reported, local gentry were buying large quantities of flour and selling it to the poor at 3½d a pound. A week later, farmers at Barnstaple, North Devon, were compelled to sell their wheat at 5s a bushell.'[419]

 

John Slade, ship-owner sea-captain and merchant of Poole [1719-1792] with an expanding commercial cod-fishing empire in Newfoundland, siezes a fishing-room at Fleur de Lys Harbour, north of Cape St. John, built by Devon ship's captain William Branscombe. `Aggressive and persistent, by the 1760s Slade had expanded his business. Between 1764 and 1770 he owned and operated three to four ranging between 40 and 80 tons and averaging 60, and deployed cod-fishing crews in Twillingate, Fogo and Tilting Harbour. Occasionally he ventured north of Cape St. John, despite the injunction of Governor Hugh Palliser not to disturb the French fishery in this area. Although an intruder himself, in 1766 Slade even seized a fishing-room at Fleur de Lys Harbour built by William Branscombe, a Devon ship's captain, whom he undoubtably regarded as an interloper.'[420]

 

[There are references to a William Branscombe of Topsham and St. Johns at about this time, describing him as a "planter", meaning he lived in Newfoundland and operated small fishing boats.[421] Keith Matthews in the Earl Kennedy papers says a Captain William Branscombe was employed in the 1760s by Peter Joliffe of Poole, who traded to the north of St. John's]

 

@1767

13 January, Morchard Bishop: Abraham Branscombe [serge-weaver] and John Godbear witness the marriage of William Rice and Mary Hodge.[422] [cf:1841 census - Betty Rice b.circa 1771 & Grace Branscombe, of Dulverton. John Hodge marries Joanna Branscombe, widow of Robert 1804 Dawlish]

 

18 February, Wolborough Street Salem Chapel (independent), Newton Abbot: John Branscombe marries Mary Mountstephen. (IGI) [cf:1787 - IGI wrong?]

 

22 February, St. Mary Magdalene, Canterbury, Kent: Betty Branscomb, daughter of Jonathan & Catharine, is christened. (IGI) [cf:1793 Leigh, Kent - William Branscomb m. Rachel Lucas. Also cf:1765 - Margarett, daughter of Thomas & Mary Brantcomb, baptised]

 

26 April, Wolborough Street Independent Salem Chapel, Newton Abbot: Richard Branscombe, son of Samuel & Elizabeth (Shapley - m.1758 Newton Abbot), baptised. (IGI) [Richard d.1771, Elizabeth d.1772 Highweek, Highweek. Siblings: John (1760-1828?), Samuel (1764), William (1765)]

 

29 April, Ottery Saint Mary: Peter Branscombe marries Mary Trude.[423] [Peter poss bp.1745 Ottery St. Mary, son of Thomas & Anne? cf:5 November this year for baptism of their first child, Elizabeth, cf:1771 for second child, Thomas]

 

13 July, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Elizabeth Branscombe, daughter of John & Ann, baptised.[424] [poss siblings: Ann (1764), Richard (1772)?]

 

19 August, Powderham: Mary, daughter of John & Mary Pearce, baptised.[425] [cf:1771]

 

17 October, Woodbury: William Branscombe marries Ann Granger. (IGI) [cf:1823 or 1825 Whimple, William Branscombe m. Elisabeth Granger]

 

31 October, Plymouth: James Bowden, aged 42, born and living in in Dartmouth, starts a period of just over seven months as master of the Nancy of Plymouth, plying the coasting trade ("a'coasting").[426]

 

5 November, Ottery Saint Mary: Elizabeth, daughter of Peter & Mary Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [poss first child of Peter & Mary (Trude), m.29 April this year? cf:1771 for baptism of second child, Thomas]

 

14 December: Samuel Branscombe, blacksmith, son of Joshua Branscombe, becomes a freeman of the city of , by succession. [This appears to be the last mention so far of a Joshua in Exeter, ending a succession, probably of locksmiths, which begins in 1641. cf:1708 Joshua Branscombe, locksmith, freeman of Exeter. 1752 will of Joshua Branscombe of Exeter administered. Also cf:1844 Monkwearmouth, Sunderland - Samuel Branscomb, shipowner and master, son of Samuel, blacksmith, marries Mary Doubleday]

 

Hargreave's Spinning Jenny.[427]

 

@1768

17 January, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Sarah Brownscombe, widow, buried.[428] [poss Sarah Webborn, m.1713 Oakford, Thomas Brunscombe? Poss children: William (1714), Thomas (1716-1728?), John (1719-1728?), Philip (1721), Zacharias (1722), Mary (1725-1752?), Hugh (1727-1751?). Husband Thomas may have been buried Oakford, 1728?]

 

26 February, St. John's, Antigua: burial of Simon Branskum, a Captain , Cy.[429] [the estate of Simon Branscomb, mariner of New Castle, New Hampshire settled in August of this year]

 

13 March: Elizabeth Branscomb, only child of James of Exmouth & Elizabeth (Heard of Bridgwater - m.1747 London) is married to William Foster, gentleman. They have no issue.[430]

 

May: A list of M.P.s in The Gentleman's Magazine includes Thomas Halsey of Great Gaddesden. [cf:1784]

 

14 May: Joseph Mortimer, mariner of St. Nicholas, Ringmore, makes his will. [proved 24 June, 1779 - his daughter Charlotte (bp.1767 Shaldon) married William Branscombe of Wolborough 1789] [431]

 

29 May, Whimple: Anne, sixth child of Thomas Branscombe & Anne (Shepherd - m.1756 Whimple?), christened. (IGI) [Thomas poss. bp.1721 or 1736, son of John & Anne Mare of Talaton m.1717? Poss siblings: William (1757), Sarah (1759), Thomas (1761), Richard (1763), John (1765), Robert (1770), Elizabeth (1772), Mary (1776)]

 

29 May, Tiverton: Sarah Branscombe, daughter of Bartholomew & Elizabeth, baptised. (IGI) [poss siblings: James (1761), Betty (1763), Mary (1766). Sarah m. John Rossiter]

 

14 June, Plymouth: James Bowden, aged 42, born and living in in Dartmouth, completes a period of just over seven months as master of the Nancy of Plymouth, plying the coasting trade ("a'coasting").[432]

 

16 August, Morchard Bishop: Abraham Branscombe [serge-weaver] and penny, Thomas Penny witness the marriage of pope, John Pope and elworthy, Betty Elworthy.[433]

 

31 August, New Hampshire Administration of the estate of Simon Branscomb, mariner of New Castle, New Hampshire, granted to his widow, Elizabeth.[1] [poss buried 26 February this year at St. John's, Antigua? Simon m.1750 Elizabeth Sheafe. Also cf1763]

 

Gaddesden Place,  Redbourn, Hertfordshire; Great Gaddesden, Hertfordshire, designed by James for the family, begins construction. (to 1773) The estate ... remains one of the oldest in Hertfordshire ... the Halsey family have been associated with Great Gaddesden since the early 15th century.

 

Redbourn: Fourth great-grandfather Edward Halsey born. [m.1790 Redbourn, to Sarah Pratt. Children: Thomas (bp.1790), Ann (bp.1792), Edward (bp.1793), James (bp.1798), Charlotte (bp.1801), William (bp.1802), Phoebe (bp.1806), Elizabeth (bp.1809), John (bp.1809), Lucy (bp.1810)]

 

Bere Ferrers: Approximate year of birth of Elizabeth ?, married ? Culwill before 1794. Later Elizabeth Branscombe (m.1794), recorded in the 1851 census as a visitor in the household of Thomas & Elizabeth Keen, of Fore Street, Bere (Ferrers/Alston?).

 

Captain James leaves England on the first of his three voyages of exploration to the .

 

Dawlish: The widow Sainthill pays 3s 9d, a rate and a half, for the Branscombe estate.[435]

 

Ottery St. Mary: Ann Branscombe buried.[436]

 

@1769

3 January, Morchard Bishop: Abraham Branscombe [serge-weaver] and William Steer witness the marriage of James Way and Christian Salter.[437] [cf: 23 November 1807, Stoke Damerel - William Branscombe marries Elizabeth Steer]

 

James 's improved steam engine & Arkwright's water frame.[438]

 

3 June, Otahiti: Cook, Captain James Cook observes the transit of Venus.

 

27 July, New Hampshire: William Branscomb's land in Hampton mentioned as a boundary in the division of the estate of Elisha Marston.[439] [cf:1763, 1764, 1776]

 

6 October, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Dionysia Branscomb marries Henry Westcott. [440] [cf:1731, Morchard Bishop, Dianisha, daughter of John Branscomb, baptised]

 

The Royal Clarence, Cathedral Yard, Exeter, is the first inn in England to adopt the French-style name of `hotel'.[441]

 

Approximate year of birth, probably in Exmouth, of Nancy (Perriam), who served on HMS Orion at the Battle of the Nile (1798) with Robert Branscombe and was given a pension for her efforts in 1853, when she was 84.

 

Approximate year of birth, probably in Exmouth, of Captain George Perriam, who died in Exeter, 13 September 1853, aged 84. An Exmouth newspaper obituary stated he was for many years master of an Exmouth trading vessel.

 

Dawlish: The widow Sainthill pays 6s 3d, two rates and a half, for the Branscombe estate, on the east side.[442]

 

@1770

Approximate time when Robert Branscombe, aged 20, is a boatswain on theTwo Sisters. [a schooner called Two Sisters of Dartmouth is under the command of on the Newfoundland run][443]

 

3 January, Morchard Bishop: Abraham Branscombe and John White witness the marriage of John Lane, gentleman, and Mary Tucker.[444]

 

18 February: Captain Cook, in Endeavour charts Otago coastline to the south of Oamaru. Names Cape Saunders, near Dunedin, after his former Commander in Quebec. (cf:1759)

 

12 March: Thomas Lenox Frederick commissioned as a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy.[445] [cf:1776]

 

6 May, Powderham: John, son of John Pearce, buried.[446] [cf:1782]

 

18 May, Okeford (Oakford - nr. Bampton?): Bartholomew Brownscombe buried.[447] [poss b.1733, first child of James & Jone (Carpenter - m.1732 Oakford)? Or poss m.1701 Oakford, Agnes Lake?]

 

18 May, St. George's, Hanover Square: James Branscomb granted a licence to marry Frances Harrison.[448] [could be James, lottery office keeper of Bampton - first wife?]

 

19 May, St. George's, Hanover Square: James Branscomb of St. James Westminster, bachelor, and Frances Harrisson of this parish, spinster, under licence from the Bishop of London.[449]

 

June: A large Spanish force from Buenos Aires descends on the Falkland Islands, and occupies them. War fever sweeps Britain, and naval vessels are re-commissioned.

 

11 July, St. Andrew's, Holborn: James, son of James & Frances Branscomb of Holborn, baptised.[450] [could be James, lottery office-keeper? & Frances Harrison, married 18 May this year?]

 

26 July, Clyst St. George: William, son of John & Sarah Branscombe, baptised.[451] [Poss John Taylor Branscombe & Sarah (Howell - m.1763 Woodbury)? cf:1774 for baptism of sister Sarah. Possibly, this is the William Branscombe who marries Honor Leigh, Dartmouth 1799? Or poss m.1793 Withycombe Raleigh, Sarah Haymen?]

 

28 October, Dartmouth: James Bowden, aged 28, Master of the Polly of Dartmouth, leaves on a voyage to Newfoundland.[452]

 

30 September, Whimple: Robert, seventh child of Thomas Branscombe & Anne (Shepherd - m.1756 Whimple), christened. (IGI) [Thomas poss. bp.1721 or 1736, son of John & Anne Mare of Talaton m.1717? Poss siblings: William (1757), Sarah (1759), Thomas (1761), Richard (1763), John (1765), Robert (1770), Elizabeth (1772), Mary (1776)]

 

2 December, Dartmouth: James Bowden, aged 28, Master of the Polly of Dartmouth, returns from a voyage to Newfoundland.[453] [cf:28 October]

 

Henry Waymouth, formerly a tobacconist apprenticed to his father Samuel, is now a haberdasher with premises in Goldsmith Street, Exeter. [cf:1752]

 

Approximate year when three brothers, William, Henry & Arthur Branscombe, settle in America. One account of Arthur's arrival is that he was shipwrecked while in search of tall timbers for masts.[454] [cf:1779]

 

Mail carts are introduced for the first time in 1770s, to replace the tradition post-boys on horsesback. [cf:1711]

 

St. Saviour, Dartmouth: Honour Leigh, daughter of Captain Philip Leigh, born. [m. William Branscombe St. Clement, Townstall, Dartmouth, 1799. If this is Captn. Philip Leigh junior he would have been only about 17 or 18]

 

Dawlish: The widow Sainthill pays 6s 3d, two rates and a half, for the Branscombe estate, on the east side.[455]

 

@1771

30 March, Powderham: Anne & Elizabeth, daughters of John & Mary Pearse, baptised.[456] [cf:1767 & 1773]

 

7 April, St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland: Widow Betty Branscomb marries Henry Radford.[457] [wife of Arthur Branscombe of Topsham. cf:1784 Topsham, William Branscombe marries Johannah Radford]

 

24 May, Ottery St. Mary: Thomas Branscomb, son of Peter & Mary, baptised. (IGI) [poss second child of Peter & Mary (Trude - m.1767 Ottery St. Mary). cf:1767 for baptism of first child, Elizabeth]

 

27 June, Highweek: Richard Branscombe buried.[458] Aged 4 years, the son of Samuel & Elizabeth Branscombe.[459] [Elizabeth Shapley - m.1758 Newton Abbot, d.1772 Highweek, Samuel's first wife. Other children: John (1760-1828?), Samuel (1764), William (1765)]

 

29 September, Topsham: Elizabeth Branscombe marries Thomas Elliott. (IGI) [cf:East Budleigh 1763 - Sarah Elliott apprenticed to Thomas Branscombe]

 

3 October, Lying-in Hospital, Endell Street, Holborn Edward, son of Edward & Ann Branscombe, baptised. (IGI)

 

Dawlish; parish appoints a female sexton, cumming, Ann Cumming.[460]

 

`Of the long-lasting political papers, the Public Advertiser (formerly the London Daily Post and later the Public Ledger) was most important. Run by Henry Woodfall, pere et fils, it scoopedthe pool by printing Letters of Junius, penetrating political criticisms anonymously written, attributed to Sir Phillip Francis or possibly Dr.Wilmot, these increased Advertiser sales from 47, 000 to 84, 000 a month by 1771.'[461]

 

Spanish end their occupation of the s, after threats of war from Britain. In Britain, war fever, and the re-commissioning of navy, subsides. De-commissioning commences.

 

John launches the United States' U.S.A.first newspaper.

 

Dawlish: Mrs Sainthill pays 5s, two rates, for the Branscombe estate, on the east side.[462]

 

@1772

Lord declares, in the celebrated Somersett case, that britainslavery could not exist, under English law.

 

5 February, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Charles Branscombe marries Ann Dunn. [463]

 

16 February, Whimple: Elizabeth Branscombe, eighth child of Thos & Anne (Shepherd - m.1756 Whimple), baptised. (IGI) [Thomas poss. bp.1721 or 1736, son of John & Anne Mare of Talaton m.1717? Poss siblings: William (1757), Sarah (1759), Thomas (1761), Richard (1763), John (1765), Anne (1768), Robert (1770), Mary (1776)]

 

2 April, Dartmouth: Giles Knighton, aged 28, master of the Devonshire arrives in Dartmouth from Newfoundland and Waterford. He was born and lives in Dawlish.[464]

 

25 June, Highweek: Elizabeth (Shapley - m.1758 Newton Abbot), first wife of Samuel Branscombe, dies, aged 42 years.[465] [Children : John (1760-1828?), Samuel (1764), William (1765), Richard (1767-1771) cf:19 November 1772 - poss second marriage & 1775 - poss third for Samuel]

 

26 June, Highweek: Elizabeth Branscombe buried.[466]

 

13 July: cook, Captain James Cook sets sail for the south via the Cape of Good Hope from Plymouth, in theResolution (462 tons-112 crew), with theAdventure, under Captain Tobias (336 tons-81 crew).

 

14 August, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Richard Branscombe, son of Jno (dec) & Ann, baptised.[467] [poss siblings: Ann (1764), Elizabeth (1767)? Poss Richard m.1798 East Stonehouse, Mary Ann Jury? Poss children, all bp. Southwark:

 

18 August, Topsham: Samuel Branscombe marries Elizabeth Cook. (IGI)

 

19 November, Wolborough Street Salem Chapel (independent) Newton Abbot: Samuel Branscombe of Highweek marries Mary Call of Wolborough.[468] [poss second marriage of Samuel, m.1758 Elizabeth Shapley (d.1772 Highweek) cf:1687 James Colle servant to Thomas Branscomb of Sussex County, Delaware]

 

2 December, Sandford: Susanna Brownscomb, [died 1806] & William (Barclay/Barely?), [died 1784], marry. [Susanna's first husband was badcock, William Badcock]

 

Bartholomew Branscombe of Tiverton, miller. (EPNI)

 

Lysons' say Edge Barton; is in disrepair and the chapel desecrated.[469]

 

The Pantheon in Oxford Street opens. Built at a cost of £60, 000, `Its mighty neo-classical dome illuminated by thousands of candles captivated fashionable taste and handsomly repaid its proprietors. Critics were appalled by its extravagance and pointlessness. Most people, it was observed, simply went to the Pantheon to see and be seen ... But here as at Ranelagh and Vauxhall, the most important activity going on was the marriage market.'[470]

 

`The early 1770s were marked by a rapid economic recovery after the spasmodic recessions of the 1760s. The result, in 1772 was a credit crisis, which threatened to engulf the East India Company. The Company was the victim of the excessively high expectations which investors continued to entertain of India. These expectations could not be met by trading propects, and were made even less realistic by a devastating famine which occurred in Bengal.'[471]

 

`In 1772 a naval cutter, the Gaspée, in persuit of smugglers, had been caught and destroyed by a party of Rhode Island men whom it proved impossible to identify and prosecute.'[472]

 

Approximate year of marriage of John Branscome & Sussanah Meader, of Piddletown, Dorset. (IGI)

 

Dawlish: Mrs Sainthill pays 6s 3d, two rates and a half, for the Branscombe estate, on the east side.[473]

 

@1773

2 January, Ottery Saint Mary: Charles, son of Peter Branscomb & Sarah, christened. (IGI) [cf:1771 for last Ottery St. Mary ref - bp. of second child of Peter & Mary (Trude - m.1767?). Poss second marriage for Peter? Charles poss m.1799 Venn Ottery, Sarah Hellier? Poss Peter Branscombe's widow buried Ottery, 1773?]

 

12 January, St. Luke's, Old Street, Finsbury: Sarah Branscombe marries John Pool. (IGI) [this is the first entry for Finsbury in the current database, and the last until 1828]

 

9 February: James Branscomb (38) admitted to the Freedom of the City of London, on payment of 46s 8d toward the public debts of the City and an unspecified amount to the Chamberlain for introducing him, plus fees to four character references. James is introduced as a member of the Liveried Company of Dyers, although by this time the strict requirement to in fact be a practitioner of the trade had given way to financial membership. So he was not necessarily a dyer. It is noted on the document that James is intending to operate as a `broker', which could mean intermediary in almost any kind of trading or operating as a lottery-house keeper.[474] [brother of Bartholomew of Tiverton? cf:1788]

 

7 March, East Stonehouse: Richard Bowden Beard [m.1799? d.1840], sixth child of Anthony Beard, rope-maker of East Stonehouse, baptised.[475]

 

13 June (or January/July?), Powderham: George, son of John & Mary Pearse, baptised.[476] [cf:1771, 1775]

 

19 June, Bow Presbyterian (now Mint) Meeting House, Exeter: Harriet, daughter of Samuel & Elizabeth Branscomb, christened. (IGI) [poss married, Exeter St Stephen, John Pye, 1810?]

 

's second voyage to the .

 

charts Van Diemen's Land.

 

The Stock Exchange opens, in London. (before this, business was transacted in coffee-houses and taverns, e.g: coffee-housesJonathan's, coffee-housesGarroway's.)

 

June/July Dartmouth: Captain Philip Leigh, master of the Joyce commmences a journey of nine months from Dartmouth to Newfoundland, Leghorn, London and return. His boatswain is Robert Pearce.[477] [cf:1774 - returns to Dartmouth. He is possibly aged about 20 at this time?]

 

14 July: `The brokers and others at new Jonathan's came to a resolution that, instead of it being called New Jonathan's, it should be called the Stock Exchange, which is to be wrote over the door.'

 

Hole was sometime the inheritance of de la Hole but afterwards came to de la Holcomb, in whose family it continued seven descents. Hole was, in 1773, in possession of the Bartletts.

 

Gaddesden Place, Redbourn, Hertfordshire, designed by James for the family, and built between 1768 and 1773. The house is reputed to have been Wyatt's first country work, and suggests that, at the start of his career, he conformed to the tradition. The Halsey family had been associated with Great Gaddesden from the early fifteenth century. The estate remains one of the oldest in Hertfordshire. There are strong American family connections through Halsey the Pilgrim, who emigrated to New Jersey in 1630, and some of whose land in Southampton, Long Island, New York, is still owned by his descendents. The family has provided many famous names in United States history, the most recent being that of the late Fleet halseyAdmiral W.F. Halsey, K.B.E., U.S.N., who commanded the U.S. U.S.A.Third Fleet at the Battle of in the , in 1944.

 

16 December, the Boston tea-party: `The Tea Act of 1773 reduced the duties on tea re-exported to the colonies, with the object of making British tea cheaper than its smuggled competitors in America. Whether this was done primarily with a view to the expansion of the [East India] Company's trade, or whether [Prime Minister Lord] North deliberately sought to bring about American submission to the remaining duty on tea imports, is not entirely clear. In retrospect the provocation seems imprudent ... The Sons of Liberty in Boston saw it as a deliberate attempt to impose an otherwise nominal duty ... On 16 December they unceremoniously boarded the first tea-ships to arrive in Boston, and dumped their cargo in the harbour. Their action was applauded in the other colonies and would have been widely imitated if the Company had not wisely refrained from landing tea elsewhere ... from a British standpoint it was the last straw, the final evidence that the colonists, or sufficient of their number to require chastisement, were intent on defying imperial authority. There is no mistaking the wave of indignation which swept through the ranks of propertied opinion in England. Even ... men who had consistently presented themselves as the champions of America, joined in demanding punishment for the malefactors.'[478]

 

Dawlish: The widow Sainthill pays 2s 6d, one rate, for the Branscombe estate, on the east side.[479]

 

@1774

1 February, Clyst St. George: Sarah, daughter of John & Sarah Branscomb, baptised.[480] [poss John Taylor Branscombe & Sarah (Howell - m.1763 Woodbury)? Sarah junior poss m.1800 Exeter to Thomas Pounsford?]

 

16 March,