BRANSCOMBE TIMELINES

The Nineteenth Century

The header for each year is preceded with an @ sign to facilitate searching


 

@1800

13 January, Newton Ferrers: Mary Brooking, widow, makes her will. [proved 1802][1]

 

13 February, Littleham: Thomas Branscomb buried.[2]

 

March: The Lady Nelson departs Portsmouth for Sydney Town.

 

5 April, St.Bride's, Fleet Street: Thomas Branscomb marries Mary Savage. (IGI)

 

13 April, Meppershall, Bedfordshire: Ann, daughter of Samuel & Sarah Bransome, baptised.[3] [cf: 1788, 1790 - their two previous children were baptised `Branscombe' in the register, although the Bishop's Transcript shows `Bransome']

 

2 June, St.Thomas, Exeter: Sarah Branscombe marries Thomas Pounsford. [4] [poss. Thomas Ponsford, carpenter, witness to agreement between William Branscombe of Exeter & Anthony Gibbs 1808. If so, this may indicate a family relationship between William, who married Honour Leigh in 1799 at Dartmouth, and Sarah. If Sarah was about 26 years old at the time of her marriage, she could have been bp. 1774 Clyst St.George, daughter of John & Sarah Branscomb. If so, she was the sister of a William, bp. 1770 Clyst St.George, who may have been the William who married Honour Leigh?]

 

14 June: Napoleon routs the Austrian army at Marengo. The English fleet continues to blockade France, preventing trade.

 

8 July: The Lady Nelson arrives at Table Bay, 99 days out from England.

 

October: The Geographe and Naturaliste sail from Le Havre under passport of safe passage from Britain, to explore New Holland under Captain Baudin.

 

7 October: The Lady Nelson sails from Cape Town for Bass Strait, and Sydney.

 

19 October, St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland: Richard, son of merchant William Brandscomb and Elizabeth, baptised.[5] [poss William m. 1799, Elizabeth Barnes? Poss siblings: Leanora Sophia (bp. 1812), George Buckingham (bp. 1814), John Arthur (1816), Sydney (1818)? Richard d. 1849 St. John's, aged 48, when he is described as a blockmaker. He has a widow, Mary. Mention is made of two brothers, William & James, and two sisters, Amelia & Mary. Amelia married Dr. Winter & Mary married Dr. Crawford. Both marriages in Newfoundland. Richard left property in Newfoundland and on Prince Edward Island worth £1500. His estate in Newfoundland was worth £900.[6] cf: 1850 Mary Frances Branscombe, relict of Richard, marries George James Hogsett in St. John's]

 

St. John's, Newfoundland: `The only houses that stood off Water Street (about 1800) between McBride's Cove and Hutchings' House, at Barking Kettle, was Mr. Carter's house on Burstheart Hill (now Carter's Hill), and Mr. Branscombe's house, which stood back of where Mr. Smith built at the foot of Theatre Hill and a cooperage near Lion's Square.'[7]

 

November: The Harbinger departs Cape Town for Sydney; Jorgen Jorgensen is among the crew.

 

December: The Lady Nelson, under the command of Lieutenant James Grant makes the first recorded passage of Bass Strait from west to east, en route from England to Sydney.

 

16 December: The Lady Nelson arrives, Sydney Town.

 

The first of two years of poor harvests in England. The pressure of the population on food supply becomes acute.

 

London's population reaches nearly 1 million. (By 1900, it has exceeded 4 million)

 

The union of parliaments of the United Kingdom of England and Scotland with Ireland.

 

Compton Castle is sold out of the Gilbert family, and becomes derelict.

 

By 1800 the City of Exeter was well down the list of important provincial centres, while remaining the unquestioned capital of the south-west ... it was easier to graduate to the freedom in some [smaller] towns than in ... the larger like Exeter and Norwich. Much depended on the degree of control exercised by the craft guilds and by the oligarchy who ruled most if not all our towns from the medieval period onwards and probably earlier.

 

Samuel Waymouth, seaman of St.Marychurch, aged 23, completes a voyage on the packet Naples from St. John's, Newfoundland to Dartmouth.[8]

 

ON ENCLOSURES:

The law doth punish man or woman
Who steals the goose from off the Common
But leaves the greater felon loose
Who steals the Common
From the goose!

 

The Napoleonic War and agricultural depression combine to force the men of Branscombe to join the popular Jack Rattenbury of Beer in smuggling.

 

Littleham: Thomas Branscombe buried.[9]

 

@1801

January: Captain John Black of the Harbinger names King Island, and the Harbinger Rocks. [on which Captain William Waymouth Branscombe came to grief in 1871] Arrives Sydney Town 12th. January.

 

1 January: The union between Great Britain and Ireland comes into effect. The Union flag is altered to include the cross of St. Patrick.

 

6 January, Greensville County, Virginia: Patsy Branscomb marries Douglass Burnett.[10]

 

12 February: Robert and Joanna Branscombe of Dawlish petition Trinity House for relief.

 

16 March: H.M.S. Invincible wrecked off the Norfolk coast, drowning 400 crew. It was part of a battle fleet of 53 ships assembled off Yarmouth in February under Admirals Parker and Horatio Nelson for the Baltic Campaign. [formerly Robert Branscombe senr. served on this ship]

 

22 March, Whimple: William, fourth child of John & Alice Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [John; poss bp. 1765 Whimple, fifth child of Thomas Branscombe & Ann (Shepherd - m. 1756 Whimple)? Poss m. 1791 Alice Mitchell, in Broad Clyst? Poss siblings: Mary Ann (1793), Alice (1795), Betty (1798), Thomas (1803), Petronella/Peternella (1806), Henry (1808), Sarah (1811), all bp. Whimple. William prob. m. 1823 - Elizabeth Granger]

 

25 March: Czar Paul of Russia is assassinated, in St. Petersburg.

 

2 April: The Battle of the Baltic. A glorious victory for Horatio Nelson. The Danish fleet is destroyed at its moorings, in Copenhagen. [cf: description by Jorgen Jorgensen]

 

12 April, St.Andrew's, Holborn: Mary Ann, daughter of William & Sarah Branscombe of Grays Inn Lane, baptised.[11] [poss m. 1830 Dawlish, Lewis Gregory?]

 

1 June: Paddington & Grand Junction Canal opens. `... the first barge arrived, with passengers from Uxbridge, at the Paddington Basin. There were public rejoicings, and all the north-western suburb was en fête in honour of the occasion. Bells were rung, flags were hung out, and cannon were fired; and one enthusiastic Paddingtonian had good reason to remember the day, for the gun which he was firing burst and shattered his arm ... passenger boats went about five times a week from Paddington to Uxbridge; and the wharves at Paddington presented for some years a most animated and busy appearance, on account of the quantity of goods warehoused there for transit to and from the metropolis, causing the growth of an industrious population around them. But this was only a brief gleam of prosperity, for when the Regent's Canal was opened [1820], the goods were conveyed by barges straight to the north and eastern suburbs, and the wharfage-ground at Paddington suffered a great deterioration in consequence.'[12]

 

4 June: George III's birthday. At the age of 63, he has been on the throne for 41 years. He is subject to fits of madness.

 

19 June, Branscombe: William Cawley dies, aged 40. An inhabitant of Beer, but born in Branscombe, the son of John & Sarah Cawley. ` He had been on a smuggling expedition, and was found dead early in the morning by John Halse, in a field of oats called Five Acres, on the west side of Markel's Hill; lying on his back with his head downhill, and [a] cask of spirit at some distance from him, below.' Buried on 21 June.[13]

 

18 July: H.M.S. Investigator, under Captain Matthew Flinders, departs England to survey the south-east coast of New Holland.

 

22 August, St. Leonard's, Exeter: Ann Crook Branscombe marries William Pim. (IGI) [Ann is the daughter of Nicholas & Elizabeth and was baptised 30 June 1776 in St.George, Exeter. Nicholas & Elizabeth (Harris) were married 17 August 1775, in Holy Trinity, Exeter. In 1838, William Pim is a witness at the marriage of Susan Branscombe, daughter of Edward & Ann (Starling) Branscombe, in Exeter]

 

1 October: An armistice is signed with France. The British blockade of French ports is lifted on October 22nd.

 

2 October, St.Saviour's, Southwark: Thomas Branscomb marries Sarah Park. (IGI) [cf: 1802 Holborn, Sarah, daughter of Thomas & Sarah baptised]

 

6 October, Highweek: Samuel Branscombe buried.[14] [poss b. 1730 or 1735, Highweek or Newton Bushel or Wolborough. Poss m. 1758 Elizabeth Shapley in Highweek? She may have died in Highweek, 1772? Poss second wife m. 1772 Mary Call? Poss third wife m. 1775 Ann Quick? According to Jones,[15] the Branscombe family preceded the Vicary family as the most important in Newton Bushel's wool, cloth & leather industries, on which the economy of the town depended. `Samuel Branscombe senior conducted his wool business from the building on the corner of Halcyon Road (now White's Garage). The business failed and the owner sold out to the Vicary family, packed up his possessions, and left town. Samuel Branscombe junior owned a tanyard in Bradley Lane but was bought out by Moses Vicary in 1837, and thus started the Vicary's involvement in the leather industry.']

 

21 October, Dawlish: Robert Branscombe dies, aged 51.[16] [direct ancestor]

 

The first national census: the population of Britain is just under 11 million. The population of Branscombe village is 603. In Paddington, the population is less than 2000, but will increase to 25,000 by 1841. The population of Dawlish parish is 1424 - in 1841 it will be 3132.

 

The population of Torquay is 838 - by 1841 it will be 5982. `Torquay first began to gain repute during the Napoleonic wars [1793-1815]. In those stirring times, war ships and even fleets were often sent to Torbay to wait for orders - indeed it was seldom but that representatives of the Royal Navy were at anchor in the bay. As these ships were at times delayed for weeks and months, the officers would send for their wives and families, and to meet their requirements, villas and cottages were built.'[17]

 

The second of two years of poor harvests in Britain. The pressure of the population on food supply becomes acute.

 

`Labour was often hired on a family basis, particularly at harvest-time, when everybody tended to be roped in, and this proved more than satisfactory from the farmer's point of view, since women workers were paid less than men (and children less still). This was certainly the custom in Dorset and, as a result of wives working alongside their husbands in the fields `... the poor little ones are locked up all day, or left under the care of some young girl of seven or eight years of age, who has enough to do to mind the baby; and when the mother comes home, smashed crockery and sullen tempers have been the result of the family left without proper guardianship or control.' Boys in Dorset, moreover, often have to go to work at the age of eight or earlier, forced to get up with their fathers at four or five o'clock in the morning and then working almost continuously until early afternoon; as a result, not only is the boy's `mind deadened, but his poor little body is permanently injured.''[18]

 

The first Ordnance Survey map, of Kent, is published.

 

From 1340 to 1801, every English monarch adopted the title King or Queen of France.

 

James, Lord de Saumerez, promoted from Captain to Rear Admiral of the Blue. [to 1804]

 

Panshanger House built by the fifth Earl Cowper. [Demolished 1953]

 

22 December, East Stonehouse [Plymouth], Devon: Richard, second son of Richard Bowden Beard & Elizabeth, born.[19] [bap. 1802]

 

The population of Exeter in 1801 was about 17,000. It will almost double by 1851.[20]

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1801

 

J Branscomb                Lottery Office               11 Holborn

 

Year of baptism of Charlotte Halsey, fifth child of fourth great-grandparents Edward & Sarah (Pratt - m. 1790 Redbourn). [siblings: Thomas (bp. 1790), Ann (bp. 1792), Edward (bp. 1793), James (bp. 1798), William (bp. 1802), Phoebe (bp. 1806), Elizabeth (bp. 1809), John (bp. 1809), Lucy (bp. 1810)]

 

@1802

6 January, Abbotsham: Catharine, daughter of Henry Brownscombe, christened. (IGI)

 

14 February: The Lady Nelson enters Port Phillip Bay, named after the Governor of the First Fleet, now retired, and living in Bath on a pension of £500 a year.

 

April (approx): The crew of the sealing ship, Harrington, anchored at  King Island for 2 months, encounter fresh wreckage on the southern point of the island. It was a large vessel, never identified. The only survivor was a cat.

 

5 April: Matthew Flinders, in the Investigator, names Kangaroo Island.

 

7 April: Flinders comes across the Baudin expedition, in Encounter Bay.

 

16 April, Stoke Damerel: Eliza Branscombe marries William Fitzgerald. (IGI) [or 14 December?][21]

 

18 April, Venn Ottery: Ann, daughter of Charles Branscombe & Sarah, christened. (IGI) [Charles poss. bp. 1773 Ottery St.Mary, son of Peter Branscomb & Ann Davies? Charles m. 1799 Venn Ottery, Sarah Hellier. cf: John Hellier m. 1749. Poss other children of Charles & Sarah: Mary (1799), William (1804) - all bp. Venn Ottery, Sarah (1805), Lydia (1808/1811?) - both bp. Ottery St.Mary]

 

The Harbinger (re-named Norfolk), wrecked at Tahiti.

 

West India Docks, London, opened.

 

16 June: Will of Mary Brooking, widow living at Newton Ferrers, is proved. She gives everything to her daughter, Mary Dolling of Newton Ferrers.[22] [cf: 1841 William & Elizabeth Dolling of Dawlish]

 

4 July, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire: Thomas, son of John & Mary Bransfield or Bransome, baptised.[23] [cf: 1809 Charlotte Bransfield or Branscome] The 1851 census for Sharnbrook lists a Thomas Bransome aged 50, born in Sharnbrook. His wife, Mary, aged 50, was born in Bedford. Their daughters Ann, aged 11, and Sarah, aged 9, were both born in Sharnbrook.

 

1 August, St.Andrew's, Holborn: Sarah, daughter of Thomas & Sarah Branscomb of Charles Street, baptised.[24] [cf: 1801 Thomas Branscomb m. Sarah Park, Southwark. Also cf: 1805 Mary Ann, 1807 Elizabeth, 1808 Tho. Branscomb, licenced victualler, "The Two Brewers", Hog Lane, Shoreditch. A Sarah Branscomb, aged 62, dies in Oatlands, Tasmania, in 1865]

 

10 October, Emma Place Independent Chapel, East Stonehouse [Plymouth], Devon: Richard, second son of Richard Bowden Beard & Elizabeth, baptised.[25] [b. 1801 cf: 1804]

 

3 December, Branscombe: The wreck of the Danish frigate Ornen (Brown Eagle) off Branscombe. The Captain and two Hands are drowned and buried at St.Winifred's. 10 men and a boy are rescued.[26]

 

Captain Herman Simpsing of Huntspill, aged 42. Buried 28 December.

 

Neils Haagensen of Huntspill, aged 26. Buried 7 December.

 

Christian Rosenberg Holst of Grimsted, aged 19. Buried 11 December.

 

31 December, Aylesbeare: Mary Branscombe marries John Farrant. (IGI) [Mary poss widow of William, mother of Elizabeth & Susanna, bp. 1787 Aylesbeare?]

 

Charlotte Dundas, the first steam ship on the Clyde. Health and Morals of Apprentices Act.[27]

 

Approximate year of birth of Mary Eales, wife of tanner Samuel Branscombe of Highweek, b. 1792, m. 1829 Highweek, d. 1847 Highweek.[28]

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1802

J Branscomb    Lottery Office               11 Holborn & 37 Cornhill

 

Year of baptism of William Halsey, sixth child of fourth great-grandparents Edward & Sarah (Pratt - m. 1790 Redbourn). [siblings: Thomas (bp. 1790), Ann (bp. 1792), Edward (bp. 1793), James (bp. 1798), Charlotte (bp. 1801), Phoebe (bp. 1806), Elizabeth (bp. 1809), John (bp. 1809), Lucy (bp. 1810)]

 

An estimated 200 men, mostly American sealers, are settled on islands in Bass Strait.

 

@1803

6 January, Paignton Samuel Branscombe of Highweek marries Mary Perrett, by licence and with the consent of (Mary's?) parents.[1] [poss Samuel b. 1780, d. 1805, father of Samuel, b. 1805, who marries Mary Hannaford, parents of Samuel Hannaford Branscombe?]

 

5 February: George now a private ship's captain, leaves Sydney for the South Island of New Zealand in his ship, the Reliance. He is never seen again.

 

6 February, Meppershall, Bedfordshire: James, son of Samuel & Sarah Bransome, baptised.[30] [cf: 1800 - some previous children were baptised Branscombe] The 1851 census for Holwell, Bedfordshire (later Herts.), shows a James Brandsom, aged 48, born in Meppershall, and his wife Mary, born in Shillington.

 

5 March: First edition of the Sydney Gazette and N.S.W. Advertiser, the first newspaper in .

 

14 April, St.Dunstan-in-the-West, Fleet Street, London: John Branscomb marries Mary Ann Lamberth. (IGI) [poss children baptised in Southwark: Eleanor Ann (1804), William Samuel (1805), Emily Sophia (1807), John Stephen (1809), Clara Elizabeth & Eliza Sarah (1812), Louisa Maria (bp. 1814), Maria Mary (b. 1814, bp. 1829 Blackfriars)]

 

21 April, Dawlish: William Branscombe, eighth and last child of John & Agnes (Pike - m. 1781 Dawlish), born. Baptised St.Gregory's, 8 May.[31] [Becomes a master mariner. Poss siblings: John (1782-1795?), Captn. Joseph (1784-1866), Anne (1787-1787), Sarah (1790-1849), Catherine (1793-1855), John (1796), Anne (1798)]

 

18 May: The Peace of Amiens is broken once again declares war on France. The British fleet restores the blockade of Brest. Napoleon assembles an army to cross the Channel.

 

10 July, St.George The Martyr, Southwark: Richard Thomas, son of Richard & Mary Ann Branscomb, baptised.[32] [Richard senior poss third child of John Branscombe & Ann (? - m?), bp. 1772 Plymouth. Poss siblings: Ann (1764), Elizabeth (1767)? Poss m. 1798 East Stonehouse, Mary Ann Jury? Richard & Mary Ann may have moved to Southwark and baptised: Richard Thomas (1803), Amelia Elizabeth (1805), John Ould James (1807), William Edward Butler (1819)?]

 

26 July: `The Surrey Iron Railway, opened on [this day] between Wandsworth and Croyden, was the first railway in the world to provide a public service. In 1805 it was extended to Merstham ... This continuation was called the Croyden, Merstham and Godstone Iron Railway.'[33]

 

28 August: Lieutenant leaves Sydney on the Lady Nelson with the first settlers bound for the .

 

6 September: Lady Nelson anchors, Ralph's Bay.

 

9 September: Lady Nelson anchors, Risdon Cove.

 

25 September, Whimple: Thomas, fifth child of John & Alice Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [John; poss bp. 1765 Whimple, fifth child of Thomas Branscombe & Ann (Shepherd - m. 1756 Whimple)? Poss m. 1791 Alice Mitchell, in Broad Clyst? Thomas poss becomes a post-boy and dies at Willand, 1847? Poss siblings: Mary Ann (1793), Alice (1795), Betty (1798), William (1801), Petronella/Peternella (1806), Henry (1808), Sarah (1811), all bp. Whimple]

 

14 October, St. Marychurch, Tormoham: Elizabeth & Philip married. Susanna & Joan s, witnesses.

 

16 October: The first colony settles at Port Phillip, under Colonel David .

 

5 November, Gibraltar: Anne Graham, later wife of John Branscombe of Kingsbridge, is born, daughter of Robert & Catherine Graham.[34] [m. 1833 Cornwall, d. 1886 Islington]

 

From 1803 the ground between the old village of Dawlish and the sea begins to be `landscaped'. Houses are built on the north side of the stream, which is channelled down artificial waterfalls. [cf: 1809][35]

 

Thomas Jefferson agrees to purchase Louisiana from Napoléon for $15 million. `The land area of the United States virtually doubled at a stroke, and created an opportunity for developing a new empire of farmers (at the expense of the original inhabitants) ... [Jefferson] had anticipated the development of a chain of communities sharing broadly similar values but remaining politically separate from each other. After 1803 it became clear that the United States could become a single trans-continental nation.'[36]

 

The Exeter Militia List of this year includes William Brandscomb, accomptant of Holy Trinity parish. He is marked down as class 1, which means he is between 17 and 30 years of age, unmarried, with no children under 10 years.[37] [possibly William Tucker Branscombe, bp. 1784, only child of William & Mary (Tucker - m. 1783 Exeter)?]

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1803

J Branscomb    Lottery Office               11 Holborn & 37 Cornhill

 

New Brunswick: Approximate year of birth of Arthur Branscombe, son of Nathaniel & Sarah (Miller). [Siblings: Rachel, Hannah, John, Polly, Ann & Conrad M, all born in New Brunswick. Nathaniel d. 1865 Ontario. Arthur d. 1847 Ontario] [38]

 

Morchard Bishop: Approximate year of birth of Mary Branscombe, registered in the 1861 census as an unmarried stay-maker lodging in Devonport.

 

Napoleonic War;. (to 1815)

 

`When a man was called for militia service, the maintenance of his dependents fell upon his own parish, and if he obtained a substitute from another parish, the costs still fell upon his own. Whatever parish the substitute belonged to, his family were paid by Dawlish parish, and the money was either paid to the County Treasurer, or direct to the parish concerned. That this was an expensive item can be gathered from the cost of maintaining the family of William Pike of Thorverton, who was a substitute for Mr. Linkhorn of Dawlish. Pike was apparently on service with the Militia from 1803 to 1813, and the parish of Dawlish paid for the relief of his family, in all, the sum of £50.8.4, which was a large sum of money for the period.'[39]

 

Baudin, Captain; & Freycinet carve Frenchman's Rock at Hog Bay, Kangaroo Island.

 

American sealers wrecked on Kangaroo Island build and launch theships Independence, at .

 

Approximate year of birth (St. Johns, Newfoundland?) of William Branscombe. He died 1865 (St. Johns, Newfoundland?) aged 62.[40]

 

@1804

21 February, St.Mary Major, Exeter: Ann Branscombe marries William Woodrough. [41]

 

1 April, St.George The Martyr, Southwark: Eleanor Ann, daughter of John & Mary Ann Branscomb, baptised.[42] [poss John & Mary Ann (Lambeth - m. 1803 London)? Poss children baptised in Southwark: Eleanor Ann (1804), William Samuel (1805), Emily Sophia (1807), John Stephen (1809), Clara Elizabeth & Eliza Sarah (1812), Louisa Maria (bp. 1814), Maria Mary (b. 1814, bp. 1829 Blackfriars)]

 

21 May, Venn Ottery: William Branscombe, son of Charles & Sarah, baptised. (IGI) [Charles poss. bp. 1773 Ottery St.Mary, son of Peter Branscomb & Ann Davies? Charles m. 1799, Venn Ottery, Sarah Hellier. cf: John Hellier m. 1749. Poss other children of Charles & Sarah: Mary (1799), Ann (1802) - both bp. Venn Ottery, Sarah (1805), Lydia (1808/1811?) - both bp. Ottery St.Mary]

 

2 June, St.Peter's, Liverpool: William Prowse of Paignton marries Jane Birchall.[43] [William son of William Prowse & Elizabeth (Saunders - m. 1779 East Teignmouth). First son William b. 1780, 15 December, Paignton. He becomes a master mariner in 1826, founding Prowse & Co. of Liverpool in 1834, owning some thirty ships, including some captained by William Branscombe of Dawlish. Later founded Prowse, Cheshire & Co., shipsmiths and anchorsmiths. William & Jane's children include Joshua, Elizabeth, Frances, William, Thomas, John, Robert Saunders & George Christian (1819). Joshua formed his own company. Frances marries Henry Miller Barclay, who founds Prowse, Barclay & Co., with his father-in-law. Jane d. 1853, William her husband d. 1871, leaving £25,000]

 

23 September, St.Gregory's, Dawlish: Joanna , widow of Robert, & John Hodge, widower, marry. John & James witnesses. (IGI) [Robert d. 1801 - direct ancestor. cf: 1797, Hodge m. Joanna Pike]

 

Foveaux Strait, between Stewart Island and New Zealand's South Island, discovered by an named Smith.

 

John completes construction [begun 1800] of Luscombe Castle, Dawlish, for Charles a banker. [cf: 1817 Stonelands][44]

 

`At the close of the year 1804, Napoleon, having arrived at the zenith of his power, determined to invade this country, and for that purpose actually collected together at Boulogne an enormous flotilla of some 2000 craft, with 16000 sailors and 160,000 soldiers. The feverish excitement into which the audacious threat threw the inhabitants of the southern shores of England may easily be imagined, and resulted in the origin of the Volunteer Force. Every high-top hill became a beacon signal point; every citizen a soldier; every market town a military centre.'[45]

 

James, Lord de Saumerez, promoted from Rear Admiral of the Blue to Rear Admiral of the White. [to 1805]

 

Newton Abbot: Richard Bowden Beard & Elizabeth, of East Stonehouse, Plymouth, have established a grocery firm in East Street. Their second son, Richard, aged about three, will marry Elizabeth Branscombe of Newton Abbot in 1825 and become a photographic artist in London, patenting the daguerreotype process.[46]

 

St.Albans: Edward Halsey is born.[47]

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1804

J Branscomb    Stock-broker               11 Holborn & 37 Cornhill

 

Approximate year of birth of Sophia Willis [d. 1873], wife of Captain William Branscombe. [cf: 1841 census]

 

@1805

17 February, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire: Edith, daughter of John & Mary Bransfield or Bransome, baptised.[48] [cf: 1809 Charlotte Bransfield or Branscome]

 

25 February, Bampton: Eliza Branscombe born, daughter of William Branscombe and Sarah (Passmore). [Eliza marries Charles Hazell in Hobart, 1843. Died in Hobart, 1881] [49]

 

Sunday 24 March, St.George The Martyr, Southwark: Amelia Elizabeth, daughter of Richard & Mary Branscomb, baptised.[50] [Richard poss third child of John Branscombe & Ann (? - m?), bp. 1772 Plymouth. Poss siblings: Ann (1764), Elizabeth (1767)? Richard poss m. 1798 East Stonehouse, Mary Ann Jury? Richard & Mary Ann may have moved to Southwark and baptised: Richard Thomas (1803), Amelia Elizabeth (1805), John Ould James (1807), William Edward Butler (1819?]

 

Sunday, 24 March, 10am: Susanna Branscomb dies, aged 63. Wife of Bartholomew, tin-plate worker and freeman of the City of London, who survived her. Buried Great Marlow, Bucks.? Her maiden name was Maybrick. She married ? Barret, who died. She then married Bartholomew in 1784 at St Mary le Bone, Middlesex, at the age of about 42. They may have been the parents of tin-smith Robert, b. about 1786 in Middlesex? [51] [Buried 30 March. Burial register calls her "Susan". Bartholomew d. 1806, buried Great Marlow]

 

31 March, Meppershall, Bedfordshire: Mary, daughter of Samuel & Sarah Bransome, baptised.[52] [cf: 1800 - some previous children were baptised Branscombe]

 

7 April, St.Martin-in-the-Fields, Westminster: Eliza Ann, daughter of George Bartlett Branscomb & Catherine, baptised.[53]

 

5 July, Oxford: George Hambridge [b. about 1785] found guilty of stealing or killing a sheep and sentenced to death at Oxford Assizes. Later commuted to transportation for the term of his natural life. [cf: 1806][54]

 

4 August, St.Leonard's, Shoreditch: Mary Ann, daughter of Thomas & Sarah Branscomb, baptised.[55] [cf: 1802 Sarah, 1807 Elizabeth, 1808, Tho. Branscomb, licenced victualler, "The Two Brewers", Hog Lane, Shoreditch]

 

21 October: The Battle of Trafalgar. Nelson is mortally wounded. Britain's command of the sea becomes absolute.

 

Among those serving on Nelson's flagship, H.M.S. Victory, is Captain Youll, a lieutenant, and resident at Barnell's, Branscombe [later called Trafalgar House for a number of years]. He attended 's funeral in an official capacity. [cf: 1806]

 

Among those present on H.M.S. Defiance, at the Battle of Trafalgar, was Jane Townshend. Despite a recommendation from Queen Victoria, in 1840, that all survivors present at the battle should be awarded the General Service Medal, Jane's application was refused, along with others by women, on the grounds that it would lead to innumerable further applications, there being a large number of women unofficially present in the fleet during the entire period 1794-1811.[56] [cf: 1853, Nancy Perriam of Exmouth granted a pension for service on HMS "Crescent" and "Orion" during this period]

 

27 October, St.George the Martyr, Southwark: William Samuel, son of John Branscomb & Mary, baptised. (IGI) [poss John & Mary Ann (Lambeth - m. 1803 London)? Poss other children baptised in Southwark: Eleanor Ann (1804), Emily Sophia (1807), John Stephen (1809), Clara Elizabeth & Eliza Sarah (1812), Louisa Maria (bp. 1814), Maria Mary (b. 1814, bp. 1829 Blackfriars)]

 

4 November, Topsham: Robert Branscombe marries Grace Trout. (IGI) [cf: 1806 birth of Mary Anne. Robert may have died soon after, as a Grace Branscombe marries in 1805 (or 1816!)]

 

13 November, Newton Bushel: Samuel Branscombe born.[57] [only child of Samuel (b. 1780 Highweek - d. this year in Highweek) & ? (poss Mary Perrett - m. 1803 Paignton?). Marries Mary (Hannaford m. 1827 Wolborough). Becomes father of Samuel Hannaford Branscombe, draper of Northants. d. 1858]

 

2 December, Branscombe: Rachel Perry dies, aged 20. Daughter of William & Susanna Perry. `She lost her life by a fatal accident. A young man named Henry Northcott, her Sweetheart, going into the house of James Gush where she was sitting by the side of Gush's wife, who had a young child in her lap, by the fire, and taking down Gush's Fire-Lock to see if it was clean, he incautiously touched the trigger, not suspecting the gun was loaded and the gun instantly going off, log's its whole contents in her Bowels. The muzzle of the Gun was so close to her when discharged, that the perforation (which was through the upper part of the thigh and over the groin, as she was sitting on a very low seat) was just as if it had been made by a Ball; tho' the Gun was loaded with Shot. She languished the whole of the day (it being about ten o'clock on the Monday morning when the accident happened) and died about two o'clock in the morning following, in the very bloom of life and in full health and strength.' Buried 5 December.[58]

 

28 December, St. George's, East Stonehouse, Plymouth: Eliza Brancombe marries Robert . (IGI)

 

25 December, Ottery St. Mary: Sarah, daughter of Charles & Sarah Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Charles poss. bp. 1773 Ottery St.Mary, son of Peter Branscomb & Ann Davies? Charles of Ottery St.Mary m. 1799, Venn Ottery, Sarah Hellier. cf: John Hellier m. 1749. Poss other children of Charles & Sarah: Mary (1799), Ann (1802), William (1804) - all bp. Venn Ottery, Lydia (1808/1811?) - bp. Ottery St.Mary. Sarah poss. emigrated to Western Australia, arriving in Fremantle, 28 December 1831 per the “Egyptian” from London as did her future husband, Thomas Reece]

 

James, Lord de Saumerez, promoted from Rear Admiral of the White to Rear Admiral of the Red. [to 1810]

 

24 ?, Highweek: Samuel, son of Samuel Branscombe & Ann (Quick - m. 1775), dies, aged 25.[59]

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1805

J Branscomb    Stock-broker               11 Holborn & 37 Cornhill

 

HOLDEN'S TRIENNIAL DIRECTORY OF LONDON 1805 [60]

Mr.James Branscomb                                       Hanwell, Middlesex

[cf: 1780 Thomas Branscomb of Hanwell]

 

Oxford: Approximate year of birth of William Branscomb, registered as a 46 year-old farmer in the 1851 census for the Oxford Workhouse.

 

@1806

28 April, St.Andrew's, Holborn: John Frederick Gap Branscombe, son of John & Sarah of Saffron Hill, baptised.[61]

 

18 May, Whimple: Petronella [Peternella? cf: 1826], sixth child of John & Alice Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [John; poss bp. 1765 Whimple, fifth child of Thomas Branscombe & Ann (Shepherd - m. 1756 Whimple)? Poss m. 1791 Alice Mitchell, in Broad Clyst? Married as Peternella, 14 September1826 in Whimple, to William Pratt of Whimple. Poss siblings of Peternella: Mary Ann (1793), Alice (1795), Betty (1798), William (1801), Thomas (1803), Henry (1808), Sarah (1811), all bp. Whimple]

 

26 May, Topsham: William Branscombe marries Jane James. (IGI)

 

31 May, Great Marlow, Buckinghamshire: Bartholomew Branscomb buried, aged 66.[62] [cf: 1805 for death of his wife, Susanna]

 

12 July: George Hambridge, sentenced to transportation for life at Oxford Assizes, 5 July 1805, arrives in New South Wales on board the convict transport Fortune, aged about 21.[63]

 

13 July, Topsham: Mary Anne Branscombe, first child of Robert & Grace, baptised. (IGI) [Robert & Grace Trout m. 1805 Topsham]

 

13 July, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire: Charlotte, daughter of John and Mary Bransfield or Branscome [Branscombe?], baptised.[64] The marriage of John & Mary, on 6 November 1796 at Sharnbrook, begins a period of official uncertainty about John's surname which persists for nearly twenty years. The entry in the marriage register notes that Mary Smith married John Bransfield or Bransome. Between 1793 and 1811 John & Mary baptise six children at Sharnbrook. At the first baptism, of Hannah in 1797, their surname is recorded as Bransfield. For the next two children, Thomas & Edith in 1802 & 1805, the registrar is obliged to record alternatives; Bransfield or Bransome. Charlotte, the next baptism, is Bransfield or Branscome. William, in 1810, is baptised Bransom, while the last attributed to parents of this name, James in 1811, is Bransome. This seems to settle down as the standard spelling (and pronunciation) by the time of the 1851 census, when there are 16 Bransomes in Sharnbrook, and this is the spelling in the registers for the rest of the century. The confusion, and the need to record alternative surnames, was sufficiently unusual for the editor of the parish register transcripts to write the following note:

 

`Every register affords instances of surnames with many variant spellings. In Sharnbrook, three families apparently had doubts as to the pronunciation of their names. The registrar between 1796 and 1808 was obliged to use alternatives; Bransfield or Bransome, Bransfield or Branscome ... it is common knowledge that there was much illiteracy in England until after the middle of the nineteenth century; this belief is well borne out by parish registers.' In 1754, the use of printed-form marriage registers and the signing of the entry by both parties first became compulsory. In Bedfordshire, an analysis of 22 marriage registers from this date shows 61% of men and 73% of women signed with a mark.[65]

 

30 September, Morchard Bishop: Eliza, daughter of John & Agnes Branscombe, christened. (IGI)

 

6 October, Morchard Bishop: Eliza, daughter of John Branscombe & Agnes (Mare - m. 1790 Morchard), baptised.[66]

 

(Kingsbridge?): Henry, fifth child of William Branscombe & Charlotte (Mortimer - m. 1789 Wolborough), born.[67] [m. 1827 Plymouth, Mary Crouch? (cf: 1835 Bristol: Mary Crouch Branscombe, daughter of Henry and Mary Crouch Branscombe, baptised. Siblings: William (1790 Wolborough), Elizabeth (1791), Ann (1792), Charlotte (1794), John (1808). There was also a  seventh child, Catherine, mentioned as a sister in the 1851 will of Ann, as yet unaccounted for]

 

Bere Alston [nr.Plymouth & the Cornish border]: Approximate year of birth of John Branscombe, possibly the son of Richard Branscumbe of Bere Ferrers and widow Elizabeth (Culwill - m. 1794 Bere Ferrers). John becomes a pilot & waterman in Plymouth, marrying Sarah -? from Calstock, Cornwall (b. 1812?), possibly about 1831 and possibly in Calstock, as all their children up to 1851 were baptised there. They had a son, John Oliver, born Calstock about 1832, who was a labourer in the 1851 census for Plymouth St.Andrew, and married in 1856 East Stonehouse, Sarah Northsworthy of Kingsbridge, by which time he was described as a bargeman. This was his profession also in the 1881 census, by which time he had a fifteen-year-old bargeman son, Frederick, another son John Crews Northsworthy (1870 Plymouth), who becomes a seaman & m. 1905 Sydney, Amy Powell, by which time his father has become a pawnbroker in Plymouth. There was also a daughter Mary Louisa (1878 Plymouth), who marries Thomas William Richard Bateman before 1918, when Sarah (Northsworthy) dies. Her husband John Oliver died in 1908. [cf: 1881 census Plymouth St.Andrew] The 1851 census also shows John senior & Sarah of Calstock had at least two other children, Louisa, born about 1834, and Richard, born about 1838, both in Calstock. John senior's mother, Elizabeth, may have been recorded in the 1851 census for Bere Ferrers, as a blind widow. [Calstock is close to Callington, Cornwall, where a Branscomb family lived from at least 1720 to 1760. John Branscomb senior, whose will was proved in 1760, was the father of at least three sons; John (bp. 1720), Richard (bp. 1722) & Thomas (bp. 1728)]

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1806

Branscomb & Co         Lottery Office Keepers
                                                 11 Holborn, 37 Cornhill & 38 Haymarket

 

Year of baptism of Phoebe Halsey, seventh child of fourth great-grandparents Edward & Sarah (Pratt - m. 1790 Redbourn). [siblings: Thomas (bp. 1790), Ann (bp. 1792), Edward (bp. 1793), James (bp. 1798), Charlotte (bp. 1801), William (bp. 1802), Elizabeth (bp. 1809), John (bp. 1809), Lucy (bp. 1810)]

 

A band of escaped convicts and renegades occupies Kangaroo Island.

 

Nelson's funeral. Captain Yule [Ewell?], of Branscombe (cf: 1805), carries a `bannerol of lineage' (?) Nelson buried in the crypt of St. Paul's Cathedral, in a sarcophagus originally made for King monarchsHenry VIII, and recovered when that king's body was exhumed and desecrated, during Cromwell's time.

 

St. John's Newfoundland: Approximate year of birth of Elizabeth, eldest daughter of William Branscombe. She dies in St. John's aged 23, in 1829.[68]

 

@1807

12 March, (Shoreditch/Bishopsgate?): Elizabeth Branscomb born, daughter of Thomas & Sarah. Baptised Bishopsgate 1810. [cf: 1801 Thomas Branscomb m. Sarah Park, Southwark. Also cf: 1802 Sarah, 1805 Mary Ann, 1808 Tho. Branscomb, licenced victualler, "The Two Brewers", Hog Lane, Shoreditch]

 

22 April: James Branscombe of Bampton [1735-1809], stockbroker, lottery contractor & lay sheriff of London, aged about 72, awarded the order of Knights Bachelors. His wife Sarah, aged about 30 [d. 1847], is made a Dame. (EBMI) [Sarah may be the wife of his son James, b. 1770, but in that case James junior must also have been knighted, as Sarah died a Dame, widow of Sir James]

 

James' obituary in The Gentleman's Magazine of December 1809, says he served as one of the sherrifs of London & Middlesex in this year.

 

The slave trade is abolished within the British Empire.

 

Jorgen paints his self-portrait, in Copenhagen.

 

26 July, St.George The Martyr, Southwark: Emily Sophia, daughter of John & Mary Branscomb, baptised.[69] [poss John & Mary Ann (Lambeth - m. 1803 London)? Poss children baptised in Southwark: Eleanor Ann (1804), William Samuel (1805), Emily Sophia (1807), John Stephen (1809), Clara Elizabeth & Eliza Sarah (1812), Louisa Maria (bp. 1814), Maria Mary (b. 1814, bp. 1829 Blackfriars)]

 

28 August, West Teignmouth: Elizabeth Branscombe marries Robert Hayman. [Anna Harries Nicholas says this is Elizabeth, second child of Robert and Joanna of Dawlish. She says the husband is Robert Spry Hayman, and that they had four children, Robert Spry (b. 8 Nov 1807, bp. 22 Nov, d. 6 Jan 1808), Joanna Branscome (b. 15 July 1818), John (b.2 May 1820), Robert John Spry (27 July 1824)][70]

 

8 November, St.George The Martyr, Southwark: John Ould James Branscomb, son of Richard & Mary Branscomb, baptised.[1] [Richard senior poss third child of John Branscombe & Ann (? - m?), bp. 1772 Plymouth. Poss siblings Ann (1764), Elizabeth (1767)? Poss m. 1798 East Stonehouse, Mary Ann Jury? Richard & Mary Ann may have moved to Southwark and baptised Richard Thomas (1803), Amelia Elizabeth (1805), John Ould James (1807), William Edward Butler (1819?]

 

23 November, Stoke Damerel: William Branscombe, yeoman,  marries Elizabeth Steer.[72] [son George Ley b. 1808 St.Austell? - cf also 1769 William Steer & Abraham Branscombe of Morchard Bishop witness a marriage]

 

20 December, Meppershall, Bedfordshire: Hannah, daughter of Samuel & Sarah Bransome, baptised.[73] [cf: 1800 - some previous children were baptised Branscombe]

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1807

Branscomb & Co         Lottery Office Keepers & Stock-brokers
                                     11 Holborn, 37 Cornhill & 38 Haymarket

 

‘At the east corner of the Middle Row, Sir James Branscombe kept a lottery-office for forty years, He had been footman to the Earl of Gainsborough, and was knighted when Sheriff of London and Middlesex, in 1806.’ [74]

 

@1808

24 January, Tiverton: Sarah Branscombe marries Robert Pring. (IGI) [Robert Pring, baker. Sarah prob bp. 1786, only child of miller James Branscombe & Rachel (Andrews - m. 1785 Tiverton). cf: 1821 will of grandfather Bartholomew, miller of Bampton]

 

3 May, Morchard Bishop: Frances Branscombe (Southcott), aged 75, is buried.[75] [wife of serge-weaver Abraham, m. 1758, mother of William? (attorney) bp. 1759 East Worlington, d. 1796, Joseph, bp. 1762, John bp. 1764 & Elizabeth bp. 1777 d. 1799]

 

12 May, Kingsbridge: John, sixth child of William Branscombe & Charlotte (Mortimer - m. 1789 Wolborough), born. [m. 1833 St.Teath, Cornwall, Ann (Graham b. 1803 Gibraltar) d. 1874, 166 Highbury New Park.[76] Siblings: William (1790 Wolborough), Elizabeth (1791), Ann (1792), Charlotte (1794), Henry (1806 - Kingsbridge?). There was also a  seventh child, Catherine, mentioned as a sister in the 1851 will of Ann, as yet unaccounted for]

 

17 July, Ottery St.Mary: Lydia, daughter of Charles & Sarah Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Charles poss. bp. 1773 Ottery St.Mary, son of Peter Branscomb & Ann Davies? Charles of Ottery St.Mary m. 1799, Venn Ottery, Sarah Hellier. cf: John Hellier m. 1749. Poss other children of Charles & Sarah: Mary (1799), Ann (1802), William (1804) - all bp. Venn Ottery, Sarah (1805) - bp. Ottery St.Mary. Poss duplicate bp. for Lydia, 1811?]

 

2 August, Hastings: George Branscombe, fisherman, marries Mary Hutchinson, by licence. [poss daughter Mary bp Hastings 1809? poss sibling: Georgina (1812)]

 

14 August, Whimple: Henry, seventh child of John & Alice Branscombe, is christened. (IGI) [John; poss bp. 1765 Whimple, fifth child of Thomas Branscombe & Ann (Shepherd - m. 1756 Whimple)? Poss m. 1791 Alice Mitchell, in Broad Clyst? Poss siblings: Mary Ann (1793), Alice (1795), Betty (1798), William (1801), Thomas (1803), Petronella/Peternella (1806), Sarah (1811), all bp. Whimple]

 

8 September: Article of agreement of co-partnership between Anthony Gibbs of the City of London, merchant, George Henry Gibbs [his son] of the same city, merchant, `but now in Cadiz in Spain & William Branscombe [m.Honour Leigh Dartmouth 1799?], now in England but bound on a voyage to Cadiz, merchant.' Trade carried on in Cadiz in the commission line. Witness Thomas Ponsford, carpenter, St.Thomas The Apostle, Exeter.[77] [poss. Thomas Pounsford who married Sarah Branscombe in Exeter, 1800? If so, this may indicate a family relationship between William, who married Honour Leigh in 1799 at Dartmouth, and Sarah. If Sarah was about 26 years old at the time of her marriage, she could have been bp. 1774 Clyst St.George, daughter of John & Sarah Branscomb. If so, she was the sister of a William, bp. 1770 Clyst St.George, who may have been the William who married Honour Leigh? cf: 1818 for further references to this partnership in regard to the administration of the late Captain Phillip Leigh's estate. Anthony Gibbs & Son, merchants, does not appear as a listing in the London Post Office Directory until 1810, when they are at 13 Sherborne Lane, Lombard Street]

 

24 September, Kingsbridge: Mary Hannaford, future wife of Samuel Branscombe of Newton Bushel, is born.[78]

 

16 October, St. Austell, Cornwall: George Ley Branscombe, son of William & Elizabeth Branscombe, baptised. (IGI) [William, yeoman m. 1807 Stoke Damarel, Elizabeth Steer? - George Ley Branscombe m. 1828 Mary Davis, St.George Hanover Square]

 

26 October, prob New Hampshire: Joseph Branscomb of Newcastle, New Hampshire, marries Elizabeth L. Dow.

 

The African slave trade is abolished, (cf: 1807?) but continues illegally for many years.

 

The estate of in Talaton, property of Sir J.totally destroyed by fire.[79]

 

6 December: H.M.S. Crescent wrecked on the coast of Jutland. [launched 1784]

 

`In 1808 some weavers on strike invaded the homes of others who would not join them and took away their shuttles.'[80]

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1808

Sir J Branscomb & Co Lottery Office Keepers
                                       & Stock-brokers

                                                11 Holborn, 37 Cornhill & 38 Haymarket                                                          

 

HOLDEN'S TRIENNIAL DIRECTORY OF LONDON 1808 [81]


J Branscomb                                        Circus Coffee House
                                                                        Blackfriars Road


Tho. Branscomb                                   The Two Brewers
                                                                        Hog Lane, Shoreditch

[cf: 1801 Thomas Branscomb m. Sarah Park, Southwark. Also cf: 1802 Sarah, 1805 Mary Ann, 1807
Elizabeth]

 

@1809

12 February, Rock Spring Farm, Kentucky: Abraham Lincoln is born, in a log cabin.

 

13 February, St.George, Exeter: William Tucker Branscombe marries Betsy [Elizabeth?] Lake. [82] [Children: Henry Lake/Harry Luke (1809-1810), Helen (1811), William George (1813), George William (1815). William Tucker may have been an accountant and/or attorney. Henry/Harry died in Falmouth, where Helen was born. William was baptised in Exeter, George was born & baptised in London. He became a Lay Vicar at Exeter Cathedral]

 

27 April, (Shoreditch/Bishopsgate?): William Branscomb born, son of Thomas & Sarah. Baptised 1810 Bishopsgate. [this birth possibly 1808? William poss m. 1839 Shoreditch, Sarah Whelpdale? If so, he is the son of Thomas (by then deceased), a City Officer. William possibly becomes a publican in Hampstead. A Thomas Branscomb is a publican at the "Two Brewers", Hog Lane, Shoreditch, in 1808. There may be two couples called Thomas & Sarah in east London at this time. William seems to have a sister, Elizabeth, b. 1807 Shoreditch, bp. 1810 Bishopsgate. There may be another sister, Mary Ann, b. 1805 Shoreditch, and another, Sarah, bp. 1802 in Holborn. There may have been a brother, William, bp. 1810 Bishopsgate & another, George, b. 1811 in Spitalfields?]

 

1 June, St.Mary's, Marylebone Road, London: Elizabeth Branscombe marries Philip Husted. (IGI)

 

St.Mary le Bone, Middlesex: Philip Husted, bachelor, marries Elizabeth Branscombe, spinster. Witnesses: T.B., W.R..[83]

 

5 July, St.George The Martyr, Southwark: John Stephen, son of John & Mary Ann Branscomb, baptised.[84] [poss John & Mary Ann (Lambeth - m. 1803 London)? Poss children baptised in Southwark: Eleanor Ann (1804), William Samuel (1805), Emily Sophia (1807), John Stephen (1809), Clara Elizabeth & Eliza Sarah (1812), Louisa Maria (bp. 1814), Maria Mary (b. 1814, bp. 1829 Blackfriars)]

 

2 August, Shillington, Bedfordshire: Eliz. Branscombe, daughter of Samuel & Sarah, marries Jas. Gray of Holwell.[85] [Elizabeth poss b. 1790 Meppershall,Beds. This is the only occurrence of the name Branscombe in the Shillington parish registers index]

 

10 August, Kenton: Sophia Pearce of Kenton marries Thomas Anning of Kenton, by banns. [Sophia's sister, Frances, married Thomas' brother Henry, and they made their home at Venbridge Farm, south of Kenton, where Henry continued to farm until his death. A James Pearce made his home with Henry and Frances at Venbridge until his death in 1831, aged 84][86]

 

16 August, St. Leonard's, Exeter: Harry Luke, first child of William Tucker Branscombe and Betty (Elizabeth Lake - m. 1809 Exeter), is christened. (IGI) [Could this be Henry Lake, d. Dec 1810 Falmouth? cf: 1809. Siblings: Helen (1811), William George (1813), George William (1815)]

 

DawlishThe Strand at Dawlish completed. Charles (1812-1870) knew and liked Dawlish very much, as did the novelist with whom he was deeply out of sympathy, Jane . The eponymous hero of Nicholas Nickleby (completed 1839) was `born' in Dawlish.

 

The new road from Dawlish to Teignmouth is completed, and marked by the arrival of the first stage-coach. Before this, passengers had to travel to Chudleigh by horse, to connect with the coach.[87]

 

7 December: Sir James Branscombe of Bampton, stockbroker, lottery contractor & lay sheriff of London, dies, aged 74. His wife Dame Sarah, [aged about 32?], survives him to 1847.[88] [Sarah may be the wife of his son James, b. 1770]

 

The Gentleman's Magazine
December 1809

At Four-tree hill, Enfield, after a short illness, much respected, aged 74, Sir James Branscomb, Knt., of Holborn, etc., upwards of 40 years a lottery office-keeper, and more than 30 a member of the Common Council for the Ward of Farringdon Without. He served the Office of one of the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex, 1807, and was interred with grand funeral pomp at the church of St.Andrew, Holborn.[89]

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1809

Sir J Branscomb & Edward Eyton        Lottery Office Keepers
                                                               & Stock-brokers

                                                11 Holborn, 37 Cornhill & 38 Haymarket                                                          

 

Ottery St.Mary: Approximate year of birth of Henry Davy, later Attorney-at-law in Ottery & executor of Honour Branscombe (Leigh - m. 1799 Dartmouth)'s will. In the 1851 census, Honour, a widow aged 81, is living with the Davy family. Henry's wife, (Hanna?) Branscombe Davy, is Honour's niece.

 

Approximate year of birth of Robert Brinscombe, baker of Bampton. [cf: 1841 census]

 

Barnstaple: Approximate year of birth of Henry Branscombe, later a haulier in Bath. [m. 1844 or 1845, Elizabeth -? in Bristol, d. 1870 Newport, Mon. cf: 1861 census]

 

Year of baptisms of Elizabeth & John Halsey, eighth and ninth children of fourth great-grandparents Edward & Sarah (Pratt - m. 1790 Redbourn). [siblings: Thomas (bp. 1790), Ann (bp. 1792), Edward (bp. 1793), James (bp. 1798), Charlotte (bp. 1801), William (bp. 1802), Phoebe (bp. 1806), Lucy (bp. 1810)]

 

Hastings: Mary, daughter of fisherman George Branscombe and Mary, is born.[90] [poss mar 1808 Hastings, Mary Hutchinson? poss sibling: Georgina (1812)]

 

@1810

21 January, St.Botolph, Bishopsgate: Elizabeth & William, children of Thomas & Sarah Branscomb, baptised. Elizabeth was born on 12 March 1807, William was born on 22 April (1808/9?).[91] [possibly the William, born in London, who is a licenced victualler in Hampstead, in the 1861 census? His son is baptised Thomas]

 

26 January, Branscombe: John Stuckey dies, aged 91. `He was more than [blank] years a Magistrate, and was the oldest Magistrate in the County for several years before he died. He died possessed of vast worldly property which, after he had long possessed without enjoying and without using, he was at length constrained to leave to others.' Buried 3 February.[92] [Weston Barton, Stuckey's main house (he also evidently owned Hole at this time) is reported to have burned down this year, under suspicious circumstances. As a Magistrate, Stuckey would not be liked by the smugglers who were popular heroes of the time]

 

30 June, Wayne County, Kentucky: Rowland Branscomb marries Nancy Barrow.[93]

 

22 July, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire: William aged 1 year, son of John & Mary Bransom, baptised.[94] [cf: 1806 Charlotte, his sister, baptised Bransfield or Branscome] The 1851 census for Sharnbrook lists a William Bransome, aged 42, born in Sharnbrook, and his wife Rhoda, 35, born in Harrold, Bedfordshire. Their two sons, Samuel aged 12 and George aged 10, were born in Sharnbrook. There is also a Mary Bransome aged 75, born in Harrold, living elsewhere in the village.[95]

 

A year of poor harvests in (cf: 1812/1813). Wheat reaches almost famine prices, at 100s a quarter.

 

Heavy rain causes extensive flooding on newly-reclaimed land adjoining the brook at Dawlish. Some new houses were washed away, as well as the Poorhouse, and the wooden bridges.[96]

 

In a single week, the imports to Sydney from sealing stations of Otago realised a sum, at London valuation, of more than £100,000.[97]

 

15 September, Morchard Bishop: Christian Branscombe [Morrish - wife of Joseph - m. 1785] is buried, aged 45.[98]

 

25 October, Highweek: Mary Branscombe marries Charles Crews. (IGI) [cf: Robert Crews Northsworthy Branscombe (b. 1870 Plymouth), whose mother Sarah Northsworthy was b. about 1838 in Kingsbridge. Also cf: 1840, John Branscombe Crews witnesses a marriage in Newton Bushell]

 

1 November, Exeter, St Stephen: Har Branscomb marries Jn E Pye. [99][poss Harriet, bp 1773, 19 June, Bow Presbyterian (now Mint) Meeting House, Exeter, daughter of Samuel & Elizabeth Branscomb? Or Harriet, bp 1793, 27 October, Topsham, daughter of William Branscombe & Jane (Pain - m. 1781 Topsham?). But this Harriet probably m. 1819 Topsham, Thomas Garlick. She and her husband are witnesses at her brother Robert Bradford's wedding to Amelia Clare, 1821. Pye is an Exeter watchmaker]

 

6 December, Falmouth, Cornwall: Henry Lake Branscombe buried, aged 1.[100] [Poss Harry Luke bp. 16 August, Exeter, first child of William Tucker Branscombe & Elizabeth (Lake - m. 1809 Exeter). Siblings: Helen (1811), William George (1813), George William (1815)]

 

James, Lord de Saumerez, promoted from Rear Admiral of the Red to Vice Admiral. [to 1814]

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY [1808??]

Sir J Branscomb & Co Lottery Office Keepers
                                       & Stock-brokers

                                                11 Holborn, 37 Cornhill & 38 Haymarket

[Entries for Sir James' business are missing from the next two editions of the Directory, re-appearing in 1813]                 

 

Anthony Gibbs & Son, merchants         13 Sherborne Lane,
                                                                                   
Lombard Street

[cf: 1808 for agreement between Anthony Gibbs, his son George Henry, both of
London, and William Branscombe of Exeter]

 

Year of baptism of Lucy Halsey, tenth and last child of fourth great-grandparents Edward & Sarah (Pratt - m. 1790 Redbourn). [siblings: Thomas (bp. 1790), Ann (bp. 1792), Edward (bp. 1793), James (bp. 1798), Charlotte (bp. 1801), William (bp. 1802), Phoebe (bp. 1806), Elizabeth (bp. 1809), John (bp. 1809)]

 

Sussex: Approximate year of birth of Mary Branscomb, listed in the 1841 census for Hastings as daughter of Mary and brother of William. Her father may be Samuel Stace, a blacksmith, but he is not registered in the household in 1841. A Samuel Stace Branscombe, blacksmith, & Mary are the parents of Samuel (James) Henry Branscomb, mariner of Hastings (b. 1817 Hastings), who marries Mary Doubleday in Monkwearmouth, 1844, and Annie Elizabeth Vibarr, bigamously, in Ararat, Victoria, Australia, about 1866. By then a miner, he dies in Ballarat, Victoria, in 1870. William may be William Thomas, apprenticed as a mariner in 1845. [cf: 1811, 19 July, Mary Branscombe m. Samuel Branscombe, Stoke Damerel]

 

1810 U.S. CENSUS [101]

South Carolina

Jeremiah Branscom

Virginia

Edmund Branscomb                                                     Greensville County
Richard
              "                                                                                 "                       "
Thomas              "                                                                                 "                       "

 

St. Johns, Newfoundland: Richard Branscombe flourished during the years 1810-1849. He seems to have been a clerk to the firm of McCarthy, Hoyles and Brown of London and St. Johns He died in 1849 and in his will is described as a "blockmaker".[102]

 

@1811

2 January, Old Church, St.Pancras, London: John Branscombe marries Mary Hexter. (IGI) [Hexter is a Dawlish name]

 

14 January, Falmouth, Cornwall: Helen, second child of William Tucker Branscombe & Betsey (Elizabeth Lake - m. 1809 Exeter), is born. Baptised 13 February.[103] [Prior to 1877, Falmouth was in the diocese of Exeter. It was the leading Packet Station of England, and there are many strays. cf: 6 December 1810 for death of brother Henry. There are no other Branscombes born, baptised, married or buried in these registers, 1663-1812. Siblings: Henry Lake/Harry Luke (1809-1810), William George (1813), George William (1815)]

 

13 February, Falmouth, Cornwall: Helen, second child of William Tucker Branscomb & Betsy (Elizabeth Lake - m. 1809 Exeter), baptised. [Siblings: Henry Lake/Harry Luke (1809-1810), William George (1813), George William (1815). cf: 1809,1813,1815]

 

15 March, Morchard Bishop: Joseph Branscombe, widower [cf: 1785,1810], & Frances Horwell, both of Morchard Bishop, publish marriage banns.[104] [m.29 March 1812]

 

27 May: J. Parsons, Rector of Holwell, Bedfordshire, conducts a survey of the population in his parish:[105] [cf: 1821]

 

inhabited houses:                                                                    24
families:                                                                                 
30
houses building:
                                                                      0
houses uninhabited:
                                                                2
families chiefly employed in agriculture:
                                29
families chiefly employed in trade etc:
                                  1
males:
                                                                                      72
females:
                                                                                   75
persons:                                                                                  
147

 

NB: `one man in the Staffordshire local militia not included in the account’'

 

2 June, Exmouth: A sudden, violent tidal wave hits Exmouth in broad daylight and otherwise good weather.[106]

 

23 June, Whimple: Sarah, eighth and last child of John & Alice Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [John; poss bp. 1765 Whimple, fifth child of Thomas Branscombe & Ann (Shepherd - m. 1756 Whimple)? Poss m. 1791 Alice Mitchell, in Broad Clyst? Poss siblings: Mary Ann (1793), Alice (1795), Betty (1798), William (1801), Thomas (1803), Petronella/Peternella (1806), Henry (1808), all bp. Whimple]

 

19 July, Stoke Damerel: Mary Branscombe marries Samuel Branscombe. (IGI)

 

28 July, Sharnbrook, Bedfordshire: James, son of John & Mary Bransome, baptised.[107] [cf: 1806 sister Charlotte baptised Bransfield or Branscome] The 1851 census for Sharnbrook shows a James Bransome aged 39, born in Sharnbrook. His wife Mary, aged 36, was also born in Sharnbrook. Their children Betsey aged 12, Thomas aged 10, William aged 7 and Mary aged 2, were all born in Sharnbrook.

 

17 August, Maidenhead: Charles Hazell born, son of John Hazell and Elizabeth (Draper). [worked for John Branscombe at 88 Pall Mall as a tea-taster. Married Eliza Branscombe (b.1808 Bampton) in Hobart, 1843. Died Sorell, Tasmania, 1882] [108]

 

15 September, Christ Church Spitalfields, Stepney: George, son of gentleman Thomas & Sarah Branscomb of Dorset Street, baptised. Born on 11 July.[109] [The terms `gentleman' or `esquire' meant men of some status though not necessarily of independent means]

 

28 September, Branscombe: William Stedham dies, aged 18. Son of Thomas Stedham of Coliton Raleigh. `This poor lad came very early in the morning to Mr Ford's Lime Kiln for a load of lime. It being very cold it is supposed that he sat down at the kiln's mouth and that, being overcome with sleep, he fell forward in upon the burning Lime, where he was found by Robert Perryman, one of the Kiln Men, burnt to death.' Buried St.Winifred's, 30 September.[110]

 

24 December: H.M.S. St.George wrecked on the coast of Jutland. [launched 1785]

 

29 December, Ottery St.Mary: Lydia, daughter of Charles & Sarah Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Charles poss. bp. 1773 Ottery St.Mary, son of Peter Branscomb & Ann Davies? Charles of Ottery St.Mary m. 1799, Venn Ottery, Sarah Hellier. cf: John Hellier m. 1749. Poss other children of Charles & Sarah: Mary (1799), Ann (1802), William (1804) - all bp. Venn Ottery, Sarah (1805), Lydia (1808?) - both bp. Ottery St.Mary. Is this a duplicate baptism for Lydia?]

 

Marine artist Samuel Walters born on a sea passage from Bideford to London.[111] [cf: 1835]

 

Bampton: Approximate year of birth of Elizabeth ?, wife of Joseph Pepler, wine merchant of 2-3 Suffolk Street, Pall Mall East. [cf: 1861 census]

 

London's population exceeds 1 million.

 

The new industrial centres of Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds are growing rapidly. Britain's total population, at 12.5 million, has doubled since 1710.

 

Governor Macquarie lays down his street plan for Hobart. (including Macquarie Street?)

 

@1812

5 January, St.George The Martyr, Southwark: Clara Elizabeth, daughter of John & Mary Branscomb, baptised.[112] [poss John & Mary Ann (Lambeth - m. 1803 London)? Poss children baptised in Southwark: Eleanor Ann (1804), William Samuel (1805), Emily Sophia (1807), John Stephen (1809), Clara Elizabeth & Eliza Sarah (1812), Louisa Maria (bp. 1814), Maria Mary (b. 1814, bp. 1829 Blackfriars)]

 

A year of poor harvests in Britain (cf: 1810/1813). Wheat prices soar.

 

`The working people reacted [to their inability to peacefully and lawfully change their circumstances through political means] in many ways, and one of these was violence ... In 1812 someone shot dead an unpopular Yorkshire manufacturer called William Horsfall ... These were more or less spontaneous uprisings, made with little planning or forethought, but there was also an organised campaign of destruction, carried on by people calling themselves Luddites. These took their name from Ned Ludd who, according to one story, was an apprentice who smashed his employer's equipment as revenge for a beating. More likely, no such person ever existed, Ned Ludd being a name the workers made up and used when signing their threatening letters. The Luddite movement began in the counties where stockings were manufactured - Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. There was no power-driven machinery in this trade, instead the weavers worked at home on small stocking frames. In the early nineteenth century their trade was already depressed because fancy hose had gone out of fashion, and so many people had taken up stocking weaving that the employers could pay low wages. They now made things much worse by bringing in a new type of wide frame, which produced a cheap, inferior stocking that brought prices down even further and wages along with them The weavers banded together and went around at night, invading cottages where there were wide frames, and smashing them. By and large the weavers were successful and the masters had to meet their demands. This is a verse from a song called General Ludd's Triumph:

 

The guilty may fear, but no vengeance he aims,
At the honest man's life or estate,
His wrath is entirely confined to wide frames
And to those that old prices abate.
These Engines of mischief were sentenced to die
By Unanimous vote of the Trade:
And Ludd who can all opposition defy
Was the grand Executioner made.
'[113]

 

By 1812, exports of bar-iron exceed the imports of foreign iron retained for home consumption, although Swedish iron continues to be bought for the use of the steel-makers.

 

7 February: Charles Dickens born, New Town or Mile End, on the outskirts of Portsmouth. (to 1870)

 

29 March, Morchard Bishop: Joseph Branscombe, serge-weaver, aged 50, marries Frances Horwell, his second wife [cf: 1785], by banns, which Frances signed with a mark. Witnesses are Robert Horwill, Mary Branscombe [possibly Joseph's daughter aged 20, fourth child of his first marriage to Christian Morrish?], and Peter Comyns Tucker [who witnesses nearly all marriages at this time].[114] [cf: 15 March 1811. Also cf: 1851 census]

 

20 April, Topsham: John William Pearce, son of labourer John Pearce of Topsham & Mary, baptised.[115]

 

14 October, St.George The Martyr, Southwark: Eliza Sarah, daughter of John & Mary Ann Branscomb, baptised.[116] [poss John & Mary Ann (Lambeth - m. 1803 London)? Poss siblings: Eleanor Ann (1804), William Samuel (1805), Emily Sophia (1807), John Stephen (1809), Clara Elizabeth & Eliza Sarah (1812), Louisa Maria (bp. 1814), Maria Mary (b. 1814, bp. 1829 Blackfriars)]

 

25 October, North Tawton: Mary Branscombe, base child of Elizabeth Branscombe, baptised.[117]

 

13 December, St.Mary, Whitechapel: George, son of Thomas & Sarah Branscomb, baptised. Born 20 November `roadside'. [118] [cf: 1811. Poss second family with parents of this name in east London at this time? Poss siblings: Edward Richard, James Francis & Mary, all bp. 1822 Shoreditch]

 

Anthony Gibbs esquire of London's account current with Messrs. Anthony Gibbs, son & [William] Branscombe.[119] [cf: 1808,1813]

 

Calstock, Cornwall: Approximate year of birth of Sarah -?, who marries John Branscombe, pilot & waterman of Bere Alston about 1831. [cf: 1851 1881 censuses Plymouth St.Andrew]

 

St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland: Leanora Sophia, daughter of merchant William Brandscomb and Elizabeth, baptised.[120] [poss William m. 1799, Elizabeth Barnes? Poss siblings: Richard (1801), George Buckingham (bp. 1814), John Arthur (1816), Sydney (1818)?]

 

Hastings: Georgina, daughter of fisherman George Branscombe and Mary, is born.[121] [poss sibling: Mary (1809)]

 

Dumfrieshire, Scotland: Margaret Branscombe born. Married Henry Fisher in Taunton, 1840. Children: William (1842), Henrietta (1844), Albert (1848), Margaret (1854 Melbourne, Victoria) [122]

 

@1813

11 January, Holy Trinity, Exeter: Elizabeth Branscombe marries John Banberry. Both of this parish. [John signed Banbery.[123] Mark Dalby says this name is Bunberry.[124]]

 

6 June, Morchard Bishop: Sophia, first child of Joseph Branscombe, weaver of Lower Town, and his second wife Fanny (Frances Horwell - m. 1812 Morchard), baptised. (IGI)

 

16 August, St.Mary Steps, Exeter: Jane Mary Branscombe marries shipwright John Bishop. Both of this parish.[125] [poss bp. 1791 Topsham, daughter of William & Mary Branscombe?]

 

5 September, Topsham: William Francis Buttall Pearce, son of William, mariner of Topsham, & Margaret, baptised.[126]

 

7 October, St.George's, Exeter: William George, third child of William Tucker Branscombe & Elizabeth (Lake - m. 1809 Exeter), baptised. (IGI) [Siblings: Henry Lake/Harry Luke (1809-1810), Helen (1811), George William (1815). cf: 1809]

 

A year of poor harvests in Britain (cf: 1810/1812). Wheat prices soar.

 

The East India Company monopoly on trade with India ends. Its monopoly of the China trade continues. (to 1833)

 

Kingsbridge: Approximate year of birth of carpenter William Branscombe. Married Grace (Neyle?) of Chillington, nr. Kingsbridge, in about 1834 [22 January @ St.Andrew's, Plymouth?]. By the 1851 census, they had four children - (Elizabeth?) Eunice (b. about 1835), Frederick (b. about 1837), Frocham/Fracham (b. about 1839) & Dorcas/Dorchas (Garland? b. about 1841), all in Kingsbridge. In the 1841 census, Grace and the children are registered without William, in Dodsbrooke.

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1813

Branscomb's Lottery Offices     1 Holborn Bars & 42 Cheapside            

 

London: Approximate year John Branscome born, relation of Maria B Barnes. (IGI)

 

Dawlish? Approximate year of birth of Joanna Branscombe who dies, aged 5, in 1818.

 

@1814

25 February, (Southwark?): Maria Mary, daughter of John & Mary Branscomb, born. Baptised St.Ann's, Blackfriars, 1829.[127] [poss John & Mary Ann (Lambeth - m. 1803 London)? Poss children baptised in Southwark: Eleanor Ann (1804), William Samuel (1805), Emily Sophia (1807), John Stephen (1809), Clara Elizabeth & Eliza Sarah (1812), Louisa Maria (bp. 1814), Maria Mary (b. 1814, bp. 1829 Blackfriars). Maria marries Rusk 1841?]

 

17 March, Axmouth: Susanna Branscomb marries Jeffery Jefford. (IGI) [Susanna poss bp. 1787 Aylesbeare, daughter of William & Mary?]

 

Start of Non-Conformist records for Dawlish parish (to 1837).

 

July: H.M.S. Orion broken up. (Robert Branscombe served, 1793-99)

 

9 August, Topsham: Grace Branscombe marries labourer George Herring. Both of this parish.[128] [George signed Hearing. cf: 1805 Grace Trout marries Robert Branscombe, Topsham Also cf: 1816 double entry for this marriage in IGI?]

 

12 August, St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland: George Buckingham, son of merchant William Brandscomb and Elizabeth, baptised.[129] [poss William m. 1799, Elizabeth Barnes? Poss siblings: Richard (1801), Leanora Sophia (bp. 1812), John Arthur (1816), Sydney (1818)?]

 

19 August, St.George the Martyr, Southwark: Louisa Maria, daughter of John & Mary Branscomb, baptised. (IGI) [poss John & Mary Ann (Lambeth - m. 1803 London)? Poss children baptised in Southwark: Eleanor Ann (1804), William Samuel (1805), Emily Sophia (1807), John Stephen (1809), Clara Elizabeth & Eliza Sarah (1812), Maria Mary (b. 1814, bp. 1829 Blackfriars). Maria marries Rusk 1841?]

 

11 September, Morchard Bishop: Mary Branscomb marries Henry Cheriton. Witnesses are Roger Cheriton, John Challice and Peter Comyns Tucker [who witnesses most marriages at this time].[130]

 

6 November, Venn Ottery: Henry Hayman Branscombe, son of Mary Ann Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [No husband listed. Henry d. 1816, buried Withycombe Raleigh. cf: 1796 Withycombe Raleigh, Mary Ann, daughter of William Branscombe & Sarah (Haymen - m. 1793 Withycombe), baptised. Sibling: John (1794). Mary Ann marries Beavis in 1827, is mother to William Branscombe, tinsmith of Mudgee? [131] 3rd great-grandmother of Robin Holmes of High Wycombe? Also cf: 1807 Elizabeth Branscombe m. West Teignmouth, Robert Hayman]

 

The Van Diemen's Land Gazette is first published.

 

Volcanic eruption of Tamboura. May have led to atmospheric conditions over England recorded in Turner paintings.

 

`Lysons notes that 7/12 of the property [of Branscombe villageEdge Barton] belongs to the Earl of  Ilchester by inheritance, and 5/12 to  B.J. Stuckey-Bertlett [Bartlett?][132], whose ancestor, John Stuckey, had purchased the moiety from the Hon. Percy Wyndham. As far as it is known, the house was occupied by tenant farmers from 1618 until 1933.'[133]

 

Gas becomes the primary lighting medium for .[134]

 

`Joanna Southcott was a native of Devonshire, and was born about the middle of the [eighteenth century]. In her youth, she lived as a domestic servant, chiefly in Exeter, and having joined the ts, became acquainted with a man named Sanderson, who laid claim to the spirit of prophesy, a pretension in which she herself ultimately indulged. In 1792, she declared herself to be the woman driven into the wilderness, the subject of the prophesy in the twelfth chapter of the Book of Revelation. She gave forth predictions in prose and doggerel rhyme, in which she related the denunciation of judgements on the surrounding nations, and promised a speedy approach of the Millennium. In the course of her "mission", as she called it, she employed a boy, who pretended to see visions, and attempted, instead of writing, to adjust them on the walls of her chapel, "the House of God." A schism took place among her followers, one of whom, named Carpenter, took possession of the place, and wrote against her: not denying her mission, but asserting that she had exceeded it. Altough very illiterate, she wrote numerous letters and pamphlets, which were published, and found many purchasers. One of her productions was called The Book of Wonders. She also issued to her followers sealed papers, which she termed her "seals", and which, she assured them, would protect them from the judgements of God, both in this and the other world, assuring them final salvation. Strange as it may seem, thousands of persons received these with implicit confidence, and among them were a few men and women of good education and respectable position in society. In course of time, Joanna is said to have imagined herself to have the usual symptoms of pregnancy, and announced that she was to give birth, at midnight of the 19th of October, 1814, to a second "Shiloh", or Prince of Peace, miraculously conceived, she being then more than sixty years of age. The infatuation of her followers was such that they received this announcement with devout reverence, prepared an expensive cradle, and spent considerable sums, in order that all might be suitable for so great and interesting occasion. The expected birth did not take place, but on 27 December, 1814, the woman died at her house in Manchester Street. On a post-mortem examination, it was found that the appearance of pregnancy which had deceived others and perhaps herself, was due to dropsy. Her followers, however, were not to be undeceived, and for some time continued to believe that she would rise again from her "trance", and appear, as the mother of the promised Shiloh.'[135] [at her death, according to a contemporary quoted in Walford, she had 50,000 followers]

 

While through all thy wondrous days,
Heaven and earth enraptured gazed;
While vain sages think they know
Secrets thou alone can show;
Time alone will tell what hour
Thou'lt appear to `greater' power

inscription on Joanna Southcott's
tombestone,

 

 

James, Lord de Saumerez, promoted from Vice-Admiral to Admiral. [to 1836]

 

George Stephenson's first locomotive runs at Killingworth Colliery.

 

`Oddly enough, [The Times] was involved in a `new technology' dispute in 1814 (as in the 1980s) when John Walter II introduced the steam printing press, and rolled up his sleeves to get the paper out himself when his men struck.'[136]

 

St.Thomas: Approximate year of birth of (Hanna?) Branscombe Davy, wife of Henry Davy in 1851 census and niece of Honour Branscombe (Leigh - m. William Branscombe 1799 Dartmouth).

 

Bristol: Approximate year of birth of Eliza(beth?) -?, future wife of Henry Branscombe of Barnstaple, haulier in Bath. They marry in Bristol in 1844 or 1845. She died in Newport, 1866. [cf: 1861 census]

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1814

Branscomb's Lottery Office
1 Holborn Bars, near Middle row

 

@1815

26 February, Topsham: Frances, daughter of Charles Pearce, mariner of Topsham, & Elizabeth, baptised.[137]

 

18 April, St.Leonard's, Shoreditch: Sarah Branscomb marries Samuel Williams. (IGI)

 

16 September, St.David's, Exeter: William Chenneour, born in Lanteglos, Cornwall, marries Mary Southcombe, born in Tavistock, by banns. Both are of the parish. They both sign their names, as does the witness, John Keen.[138] [parents of Mary Ann Chenneour (bp. 1822 Exeter), who marries Edward Branscombe in Coventry, 1847. Therefore they are our third great-grandparents. cf: 1841 census for Bartholomew Street, Exeter]

 

24 September, St.Botolph-without-Aldgate, London: George William, fourth and last child of William Tucker Branscombe & Elizabeth (Lake - m. 1809 Exeter), baptised.[139] [cf: 1840 or poss 1843 marriage to Amelia J ? Children include Effie Julia (1846), (Louisa/Francis? c1854?), Clara (c1856?). 1851 census - George is a Lay Vicar at Exeter Cathedral & "professor of music" in Exeter. George’s siblings: Henry Lake/Harry Luke (1809-1810), Helen (1811), William George (1813)]

 

30 November, Brunswick County, Virginia: Benjamin Branscomb marries Tabitha Seward.[140]

 

24 December, Brailsford, Derbyshire: Anne, daughter of James & Anne Branscombe, baptised. (IGI)

 

Chillington, nr.Kingsbridge: Approximate year of birth of Grace (Neyle?), who married carpenter William Branscombe of Kingsbridge in about 1834. By the 1851 census, they had four children - (Elizabeth?) Eunice (b. about 1835), Frederick (b. about 1837), Frocham/Fracham (b. about 1839) & Dorcas/Dorchas (Garland? b. about 1841), all in Kingsbridge. In the 1841 census, Grace and the children are registered without William, in Dodsbrook.

 

`In about 1815 the death rate stopped falling and, in fact, it increased slightly. It did not start to fall again until after 1870. Obviously something had gone wrong, and we can get some idea as to what it was if we look not only at the increase of the population, but also at changes in its distribution. Between 1801 and 1841 the population of the whole country rose by about 60%, but the large towns grew by nearly 140%. Individual towns grew even faster than this, as we can see from Manchester and Bradford. In the sixty years before 1831, Manchester increased its size six times. Bradford grew by 50% every ten years between 1811 and 1851, and by that time only half the people living in the town had been born there. Before the Industrial Revolution, most people of England and Wales lived in the countryside; by 1851 half of them were town dwellers. From being a farming country we had become the first nation in the world to be mainly industrial. This was one of the most important developments in our history, but it brought its problems.'[141]

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1815

Branscomb's Lottery Office
1 Holborn Bars, near Middle row

 

Topsham: The brig Flora is launched, owners in 1839/40 are Cockings, when its home port is Torquay, and it is engaged on the Teignmouth-Swansea run, and the master is W. Pearce.[142]

 

The Battle of battlesWaterloo.

 

Davy, Sir Humphry Davy invents his safety lamp for miners.

 

The will of Warren of Bishopsteignton, is proved.[143] [poss. m. 1782 Elizabeth Branscombe, sister of Robert?]

 

`During the Napoleonic Wars, Britain had enjoyed considerable prosperity, but in the years that followed - from 1815 almost to the accession of Queen Victoria - there was a long period of deflation. Lord Ernle saw this as `one of the blackest periods of English farming', although historians now consider that the distress was precipitated by plummeting wheat prices, and was largely confined to arable farming in the South and East.'[144]

 

The Statute of Artificers (or Apprentices), in force since 1563, is repealed. Although it had long ceased to be put completely into practice, it had largely controlled the development of the British industrial economy for 250 years.[145]

 

`The city ... was still essentially the Exeter of the Tudors, enclosed within the old city walls. The Chenneours would have witnessed the bustle and jostling of the street traders which caused considerable congestion in the High Street, a daily re-enactment of the scene going back to medieval times. Within the walls there remained much of the old city, its narrow alleys and packed slums interspersed with the open spaces formed by gardens and the courts that had once belonged to the wealthier merchants and industrialists. Exeter was no longer one of the wealthiest and largest cities of the kingdom as it had been in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries when the wool trade was supreme. Water was still obtained from private wells, an ancient conduit, cisterns and a few public pumps. Through the narrow cobbled streets, open gutters provided the only means for the disposal of sewage and household slops.'[146]

 

St. John's, Newfoundland: William Branscombe serves on the Grand Jury during this period.[147]

 

John Branscombe Crews born. Mayor of Prahran, Victoria,1863-4. [148] [Died 1905. Early Prahran settler and identity. Councillor, Mayor of Prahran and founder of coffee palaces, M.L.A. cf: 1840, John Branscombe Crews witnesses a marriage in Newton Bushell]

 

@1816

3 March, Withycombe Raleigh: Henry Hayman Branscombe, aged 16 months, buried.[149] [cf: 1814 Henry Hayman bp., Venn Ottery, son of Mary Ann Branscombe, daughter of William Branscombe & Sarah (Haymen - m. 1793 Withycombe). Mary Ann marries Beavis in 1827, is mother to William Branscombe, tinsmith of Mudgee? [150] 3rd great-grandmother of Robin Holmes of High Wycombe?]

 

1 May 1816: W. Branscombe, Junr, Plymouth, Tanner, May 4, 18 and Jun 11 at Guildhall. [151]

 

2 May, Plymouth: W. Branscombe junior bankrupt.[152] [cf: 13 March 1828 - W. Branscombe senior. 1807 William Branscombe marries Elizabeth Steer in Stoke Damerel. 1848 Agnes Branscombe, widow of William Branscombe junior of Kingsbridge, dies]

 

3 June, St.Sidwell's, Exeter: John Branscombe, carpenter,  marries Elizabeth Seward.[153] [Both sojourners in St.Sidwell? Poss. son of William & Sarah, b.Withycombe Raleigh 1794? cf: 1854 Sept Q Exeter, Elijah Seward Branscombe's death registered. Also cf: 1818 Heavitree, John Branscombe, joiner & sub-postmaster]

 

2 July, Ashburton: Richard Branscombe, tanner of Newton Bushel, marries Mary Edwards (of Ashburton?), by licence.[154] [possibly bp. 1793 Highweek, third child of John & Mary (Mountstephen - m. 1787 Wolborough)? If so, he is brother of John the draper & Elizabeth (Beard). cf: 1817 for the birth of their first child, Richard, who becomes a carpenter, and then a licenced victualler in Hertfordshire and London. When Richard junior married Eliza Lovelace in Paddington, 1840, Richard senior was said to be a baker. Poss second son Frank? b. 1824/5 Newton Bushel? An apprentice wood-turner in Shoreditch in the 1841 census. Poss m. 1856 Chelsea, Ann Bartlett. If so, his father Richard is described as a clerk, while Frank himself is an engraver. By 1881, he is a wood-turner in Berkhampstead. He poss d. 1907 Christchurch district?]

 

14 July, St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland: John Arthur, son of merchant William Brandscomb and Elizabeth, baptised.[155] [poss William m. 1799, Elizabeth Barnes? Poss siblings: Richard (1801), Leanora Sophia (bp. 1812), George Buckingham (1814), Sydney (1818)?]

 

8 August, Topsham: Grace Branscombe marries herring, George Herring. (IGI) [cf: 1814 - double entry in IGI for this marriage?]

 

15 September, Morchard Bishop: Henry, son of Joseph; Branscomb & Frances (Fanny Horwell - m. 1812 Morchard), christened. (IGI) [d. 1818. Second child of weaver Joseph, of Lower Town & his second wife. Henry's sister Sophia bp. 1813. Marjorie Thomas' transcript of parish register [156] says Joseph's wife is Anne]

 

13 November, Greensville County, Virginia: Polly Branscomb marries Thomas Hill.[157]

 

The Hobart Town Gazette is first published.

 

The first immigrant ship to Hobart, the Adamant, arrives.

 

`In Kelmscott House, Hammersmith, lived William Morris, whose influence on the artistic development of printing and in many other directions is well known. On a small outer building adjacent is a tablet stating that in this house Sir Francis Ronalds, F.R.S., made the first electric telegraph, eight miles long, in 1816.'[158]

 

`The Year Without a Summer', in Britain. Grain prices at record levels. `There were ... big variations in the price of bread, the staple food of working class families.'[159]

 

Mary Shelley writes Frankenstein.

 

Exmouth: Approximate year of birth of Joseph Perriam, future husband of Susanna Mary Branscombe, b. 1821 Topsham to Robert & Amelia (Clare). [cf: 1851 census]

 

Henrie County, Virginia: Joseph Edmond Branscome born, son of Benjamin & (Southwood). According to a letter written by Joseph’s son, Benjamin Franklin Branscombe, in 1903, Benjamin senior arrived in America from Scotland with his two brothers, one of unknown name and the other, Edmond, shortly after the conclusion of the Revolutionary War (1775-1783). Joseph Edmond moved to Ohio and married Dianah Pierce, a second cousin of Franklin Pierce, 14th president of the US (1853-1857). They moved to Knox County, Illinois, settling on the Spoon River in 1838. Joseph went to California in 1853 and returned in 1855, when the family moved to Iowa. They moved again, in the following year, to Maysville, Missouri, where he became Sheriff. In July 1865, he was shot and killed by a Mr Stoffel.[160]

 

@1817

January: Five acres of Dawlish Warren washed away.

 

`The passage from the Dawlish side to Exmouth was a ferry for a very long time. It is mentioned in our earliest Dawlish records simply as "passage". There was a passage house on the Exmouth side, with a bell to recall the ferryman, but no house or bell seems to have been provided on the Dawlish side.'[161]

 

23 February, Ashburton: Richard Brandcombe, son of Richard & Mary (Edwards), baptised. (IGI) [m. 1840 Eliza Lovelace, St.James Paddington. His father, Richard was then a baker, while Richard junior was a carpenter, living in Dudley Grove. By the time of his death in 1872, Richard junior was a licenced victualler]

 

27 March, Withycombe Raleigh: Mary Anne Branscombe marries John Basten. Both of this parish.[162] [Marjorie Thomas transcribes this as John Barker.[163] Robin Holmes transcribes it as Baslen.[164] This could be John Bastin, father of John Branscombe Basten/Bastin, born in Littleham circa 1818. The 1851 census for Withycombe Raleigh includes an aunt, Elizabeth Branscombe, aged 53, born in Payhembury, in his household]

 

8 April, St.Clement's, Townstal, Dartmouth: Bachelor Edward Branscombe, painter [& glazier] of Dawlish, marries Ann Starling of Townstal [direct ancestors]. Witnesses are Mary Fox and Henry Tuckerman.[165] Ann Starling's great-aunt Mary Merrygame married a Thomas Fox. Ann & Edward's fourth child, born in 1823, is called Thomas Fox Branscombe.

 

10 May, St.David's, Exeter: William Branscombe [d. 1859] marries Eliza Dacie. [166] [cf: 5 October - double entry? William d. 1859 Paddington]

 

8 June, Topsham: Samuel George Pearce, son of labourer John of Topsham, & Mary, is baptised.[167]

 

13 July, Tonbridge Independent Chapel: Martha, daughter of shoemaker Edward & Mary Crouch, is baptised. Born Penshurst, Kent. Becomes third wife of William Branscombe, shoe-maker of Torquay, in 1865, and dies at Eton in 1901. [sibling: Mary (about 1814), married Bird - a widow living with Martha in 1881 census]

 

18 July, Newport Pagnell, Buckinghamshire: John, son of Thomas & Alice Branscomb, baptised. (IGI) [cf: 1886 Emily Mary J Branscomb born, Newport Pagnell]

 

21 July, St.Mary's, Newington, Surrey: Thomas Branscombe marries Mary Elizabeth Roxby. (IGI) [Possibly Thomas Branscomb, labourer/warehouseman, & Mary Elizabeth? If so, their son Henry (bp. 1825) marries Jane (Waterlow - m. 1849 Stepney). They run a hatters in Cambridge Road, Mile End. cf: 1824 Thomas Branscombe, china glass & earthenware dealer, 34 High Street, Mile End]

 

1 August, Withycombe Raleigh: Henry, son of John Branscombe, joiner, & Elizabeth (Seward - m. 1816 Exeter?), born.[168]  [bap. 9 Aug., m. 1836 Exeter, Mary Ann Horn. cf: 1851 census. Died 1876, Victoria, Australia]

 

9 August, Withycombe Raleigh: Henry, son of John Branscombe, joiner, & Elizabeth, baptised.[169] [b. 1 Aug. cf: 1818 John Branscombe, joiner & sub-postmaster of Heavitree]

_______________________________________________________________________
Exeter Flying Post

Thursday 21 August 1817

 

Whereas I, William Branscombe, of Exmouth, Boat-master, was on Monday 11th. instant, hired by Charles Gifford Esq. to take him in my boat to Teignmouth, where I grossly insulted him, from which he commenced a prosecution against me, but has condescended to withdraw it, on my paying one pound seven shillings to the Humane Society, in Exeter, and publicly acknowledging my fault: I hereby express my contrition for my offence, and my humble thanks for his foregiveness.

 

The Mark of William Branscombe
Witness Henry Southcott

 

[Charles Gifford, brother of Lord Gifford, resided permanently at Exmouth in what was known as "Brimstone House", Prospect Place, demolished before 1885. The Giffords owned considerable property in the area. cf: 1726 Sandford: Mary S. Brownscombe (d. 1778) & Robert Southcott, marry. Also cf: 1841 & 1851 censuses]

______________________________________________________________________

 

5 October, St.David's, Exeter: William Branscombe, Gentleman of Holy Trinity, Exeter [accomptant/common carrier/gentleman of St.Sidwell's], marries Eliza Dacie of St.David's, by licence.[170] [cf: 10 May - double entry? Children: Louisa (1819), William Dacie (1821), Selina (1823), John Austwick (1825), Frederick (1827), Rev. George Henry Dacie (1831), Eliza Austwick (1834)]

 

5 November, Morchard Bishop: Elizabeth Branscombe of Morchard Bishop marries William Holmes, husbandman and resident, by banns. Witnesses are Jas Branscombe, Roger Cheriton, William Oxnam. [a regular witness][171] [ancestor of Robin Holmes?]

 

Hobart is said to be `no more than a collection of huts'. Church services are held in the King's store. Convict women lack shelter at night, and `depravity' is widespread. Wives are bought and sold. Government officers keep concubines.

 

Captain William Bligh buried at St. Mary, Lambeth.

 

John Nash builds the villa of Stonelands, Dawlish, which became the home of Sir John Rennie, eminent architect and engineer.[172] [cf: 1804]

 

Hastings: According to the Merchant Navy records in the P.R.O. Kew,[173] this is the year of birth of Samuel (James) Henry Branscomb, master mariner (1851 Newcastle), ship-owner & miner of Sunderland, Newcastle-upon-Tyne & Australia. Married Mary Doubleday in Monkwearmouth, 1844. Living in St.Lawrence Row, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, in the 1851 census. Their children probably include: Mary (1845-1845), Mary (1846), Henry Samuel (1848), Charles (1850) & Isabella (1853), all born in Newcastle or the Tyne area. Samuel went to Australia in about 1853 and probably never returned. He married for the second time, bigamously, in 1866 in Ararat, Victoria, Annie Elizabeth Vibarr. They had no children. He died 1870 in Ballarat. [Victoria Pioneers Index gives his mother as Mary (U?)]

 

Devonshire: Mary Branscome born. Married John Cameron of Inverness, in London. Children: John (b1856 Prahran, Victoria, Australia).[174] [poss m.1837 Dec , St Mary Newington as Mary Branscomb?]

 

@1818

19 April, St. John's, Newfoundland: Sydney, (son/daughter?) of merchant William Brandscomb and Elizabeth, born. Baptised St. John the Baptist, St. John's, 24 July 1819.[175] [poss d. 1885 Barbados? William m. 1799, Elizabeth Barnes? Poss siblings: Richard (1801), Leanora Sophia (bp. 1812), George Buckingham (1814), John Arthur (1816)?]

 

30 April, Dawlish: Joanna Branscombe, aged 5 years, dies.[176]

 

23 July, St.Gregory's, Dawlish: Anne Starling, daughter of Edward Branscombe, [painter &] glazier, & Anne (Starling - m. 1817, Dartmouth), baptised.[177] [IGI says 22 Feb this year]

 

10 September: Thomas Bowden of Topsham, shipwright, marries Frances Hannaford.[178]

 

1 October: Article of agreement of co-partnership between Anthony Gibbs, George Henry Gibbs & William Branscombe. Trade carried on in Cadiz in the commission line. Resident in Cadiz - William Branscombe. Witnessed by M.O. Osborne, Attorney, Bristol, and Thomas Goddard, merchant, Cadiz.[179] [cf: 1808. Agreement lasted seven years? Corporation of London Records Office has correspondence in relation to this partnership 1818-25][180]

 

11 December, Greensville County, Virginia: Lucy Branscomb marries Herbert Harris.[181] [cf: 1793 Greensville Co., Frances Branscomb m. William Harris]

 

14 December, Morchard Bishop: Burial of Henry Branscombe of Lower Town, aged 2.[182] [b. 1816 son of Joseph, weaver of Lower Town & Anne (or Fanny?)]

 

Correspondence between William Branscombe [m.Honour Leigh Dartmouth 1799?] at 4 Longbrook Street, Exeter, and Henry Gibbs concerning the administration of the late Captain Philip Leigh's estate.[183] The beneficiaries listed are:

 

            Sarah Burrell                £35.00

            Honor Branscombe      £34.19

            W. Branscombe                       £ 3.10

            Mary Berry                  £ 3.10

            Wm. Burrell                  £ 1.15

            Sarah Richardson         £ 1.15

            Elizabeth Chorley          £ 1.15

 

Ring and Dump coins first introduced into Van Diemen's Land.

 

British forces defeat Marathas, and effectively become rulers of India.

 

John Sims Reeves, famous English tenor vocalist and later teacher of Edward George Branscombe [George Edward Salmon], is born. [d. 1900][184]

 

`In 1818 some Stockport strikers seized a number of girls who were going to work, and held them under the pump ... there was an attack on a Stockport mill and troops had to come in to defend it.'[185]

 

Nathaniel & Henry Branscombe, sons of Arthur and Rachel of Grand Lake, move from New Brunswick, where they were born, to Hallowell, western Canada. Nathaniel married Sarah Miller, while Henry married Lydia Miller, who may have been her sister. Their brother Arthur [d. 1875], who stayed behind in New Brunswick, also married a Miller - Martha.[186]

 

Littleham: Approximate year of birth of John Branscombe Bastin, possibly the son of Mary Anne Branscombe and John Bastin/Basten, m. 1817 in Withycombe Raleigh. In the 1851 census, John junior's aunt, Elizabeth Branscombe, is shown living in his household. [cf: also 1841 census for Littleham]

 

Approximate year of birth of Emma Branscomb, bap.3 Jan 1831, St.Sepulchre, London [also known as Holy Sepulchre without Newgate], daughter of John (deceased in 1831) & Mary of 8 West Street, Smithfield (1831). Said to be thirteen years of age at baptism.[187] [cf: 1828 Finsbury, Hellen bapt., d. of John & Mary, 1846 Greenwich marriage of Emma Branscomb. Poss John & Mary Hexter, m. 1811 Old Church, St.Pancras?]

 

Approximate year of birth, in Middlesex, of John Branscombe, son of mercantile clerk John, who becomes a wood turner and marries Emma Scales, in 1840. [cf: 1841 census - Shoreditch. Could John senior be the John mentioned above, husband of Mary, father of Emma & possibly Hellen & John? Children of John & Emma Scales: Thomas (1845), Mary (1848), John (1852), William (1853), Edwin (1856), Emma (1861), William Mortlock (1863), Ernest (1865), Alice M. (1869)]

 

Joseph Grimaldi (1778-1837), clown, lived in Exmouth Market, London, from 1818 to 1828.

 

John Branscombe, joiner and sub-postmaster, lives at Fore Street, Heavitree. [directory listing.[188] cf: 1817 John Branscombe of Withycombe, joiner, & Elizabeth (Seward - m. 1816 Exeter?). Also cf: 1824 Mrs Branscombe registered in Heavitree]

 

1818 TENNESSEE CENSUS [189]

Joseph Branscomb

 

@1819

February-September: Series of letters sent to William Branscombe in Cadiz from Gibb & Sons Ltd., merchant & foreign bankers of London, and from his wife.[190] [William d. 1819 November, of yellow fever]

 

7 February, St.George The Martyr, Southwark: William Edward Butler Branscombe, son of Richard & Mary Ann Branscombe, baptised.[191] [Richard senior poss third child of John Branscombe & Ann (? - m?), bp. 1772 Plymouth. Poss siblings: Ann (1764), Elizabeth (1767)? Poss m. 1798 East Stonehouse, Mary Ann Jury? Richard & Mary Ann may have moved to Southwark and baptised: Richard Thomas (1803), Amelia Elizabeth (1805), John Ould James (1807), William Edward Butler (1819?). Emma (Bigwood), married William Branscombe, poss 1860 in Bristol? They had two sons. William Harcourt was born in Bristol in 1873. He went to Cambridge and rowed for his college. Working as a mining engineer, he was visiting what is now Ghana when he was attacked by natives and killed, in 1901. John Ernest Mackay was born in Barton district in 1879. He was a sculptor with studios in London. He died in Maidstone in 1956. Emma died in Herne Bay, in 1927. Her executor was Mary Elizabeth Branscombe, a spinster. cf: 1807 brother John Ould baptised?]

 

8 February, Dawlish: George Beard marries Mary Hoare. (IGI) [possibly George Beard, builder, father of Mary, who marries William Waymouth Branscombe 29 Nov 1854?]

 

19 April, Littleham: John Bishop of Littleham marries Alice Branscombe of Littleham. Witnesses Mary Ann Bastin and John Blackmore.[192] [cf: 1817 Mary Anne Branscombe m. John Bastin, Withycombe Raleigh. Also cf: 1813 - John Bishop m. Jane Mary Branscombe]

 

24 July, St. John the Baptist, St. John's, Newfoundland: Sydney, (son/daughter?) of merchant William Brandscomb and Elizabeth, baptised. Born St. John's, 19 April, 1818.[193] [poss d. 1885 Barbados? Poss William m. 1799, Elizabeth Barnes? Poss siblings: Richard (1801), Leanora Sophia (bp. 1812), George Buckingham (1814), John Arthur (1816)?]

 

5 August, Withycombe Raleigh: Charles Branscombe son of John, carpenter, & Elizabeth, born [bap. 22 Aug].[194]

 

8 August, St.David's, Exeter: Louisa Branscombe, first child of William & Eliza (Dacie - m. 1817, Exeter), baptised. (IGI) [William, gentleman of St.David's Hill.[195] siblings: William Dacie (1821), Selina (1823), John Austwick (1825), Frederick (1827), Rev. George Henry Dacie (1831), Eliza Austwick (1834)]

 

Approximate year of Louisa Branscombe's birth. (Somerset?) She arrives in Adelaide, in 1849, as a spinster emigrant.

 

15 August, Dawlish: Susanna, daughter of Edward Branscombe, baptised.[196] [Edward, painter & glazier, & Ann(e) (Starling - m. 1817, Dartmouth). cf: 1841 census Littleham]

 

`In 1819, [the Dawlish Poor House] was removed from the Strand to a site near the present school in Old Town Street ... there were five separate poorhouses here, and they remained in use as a home for poor old people until 1850.'[197]

 

22 August, Withycombe Raleigh: Charles Branscombe, son of John, carpenter, & Elizabeth, baptised.[198] [b.5 Aug. Becomes a mason - cf: 1851 census]

 

25 August, Bratton Fleming: The will of William Brownscombe is proved in the Court of the Archdeaconry of Barnstaple.[199]

 

29 September, Topsham: Harriett Branscombe marries cordwainer Thomas Garlick. Both of this parish.[200] [poss bp. 1793 Topsham, third child of mariner William Branscombe & Jane (Pain - m. 1781 Topsham)? cf: 1821 marriage of Robert Branscombe & Amelia Clare. Also cf: 1834]

 

November (Cadiz?): William Branscombe dies of yellow fever.[201]

 

3 November, Withycombe Raleigh?: George Branscombe, son of Mary Ann Branscombe, spinster, born. [bap. 1827][202]

 

19 December, St.Andrew's, Holborn: Mary Ann Cross Branscumb, daughter of cooper George and Mary Ann, of Grays Inn Lane, baptised. Born 28 November.[203] [cf: 1801]

 

Approximate start of the reign of `Governor Wally' (Henry Wallen), on Kangaroo Island. (to 1836)

 

John Branscombe of Morchard Bishop - testamentary cause.[204] [John, son of Abraham and Frances (Southcott), bp. 1764?]

 

Approximate year Ann(e) (Bowden/Waymouth/Webber/Smith?) marries William Branscombe, shoe-maker, possibly in Torquay.

 

`Shoemakers had a reputation for radical politics, hard drinking, a fondness for pets, especially songbirds, and ideas above their station. The radical tradition was of long standing. The patron saints of the trade are Crispin and Crispinian and legend says that they were both martyred at Soissons in 285 AD for preaching the then heretical new religion of Christianity [they were both shoemakers] ... The shoe-making trade encompassed many different tasks, of varying skill and status. Though some shoemakers bought and cut their own leather and did all the work in their own establishments, most were employed in a "putting out" system. Under this arrangement the leather was cut to size in a "factory" or "college" (proper mechanised "manufactories" did not appear until around 1860) ... The man who did this was the clicker and had the highest income and status. His skill in cutting hides could make or break a business. In fact, many became merchants in their own right. The strange name comes either from the sound their knives made as they cut the leather, or from the Old French claquer to shout. In olden days, clickers had to advertise their merchant's goods by shouting for trade. Leftovers from the hides would be cut into pieces by a "rough-stuff cutter" and the pieces used for filling heels. The strips of leather were passed out to shoemakers proper, who assembled the shoes. The upper leathers were sewn into shape on a last, which was a wooden or iron foot-shaped template. This relatively light work could be done by women, children or old men, the "hand-binders" or "boot-binders" of census returns. Fit young men sewed the uppers onto the soles, a hard task because of the tough leather. The heels would be sewn on, then the new shoes would be given eyeholes for laces, if necessary, and buffed, polished and generally "finished". Once completed, the footware went back to the "college". The merchant paid his fees and organised the transport and sale of the finished shoes. The merchants were involved at the beginning and end of the system, putting out the raw materials and selling the finished goods. The shoemakers were "labour only" sub-contractors, supplying their skill and some modest capital, such as lasts and needles, though lasts could be hired from merchants ... Under this domestic system, the merchants risked very little capital. Any downturn in trade would result in giving out fewer strips, the cost of recession being borne, therefore, by the shoemakers. The shoemakers had the freedom to take strips from any merchants and do the work at their pace in their own time: they would reputedly spend half the week earning their monies by ferocious efforts, staying awake all night to complete their tasks, and the other half of the week getting drunk ... There was no distinction between left and right shoes until after mechanisation. Earnings were poor even by contemporary standards: only ten shillings a week or less in many parts of the country until the 1850s ... The shoemaking trades were widespread, as every city, town or village had its resident shoemaker, cobbler or clogger ... The trades employed 250,000 people in 1861, when they formed the sixth largest employment category in the national census, employing more people than the coal-mining, railways or engineering industries.'[205]

 

The American ship Savannah crosses the Atlantic using both steam and sail.[206]

 

Approximate year of birth of John Branscombe, registered in the household of Hannah Davis, in Littleham, in the 1841 census. Also in the household is John [Branscombe?] Bastin, a bricklayer. [cf: 1818]

 

St.Aldate's, Oxford: Robert Branscomb, tinman, marries Eliza(beth) Talboys (b. 1795 Oxford).[207] [Robert died 1858 in Birmingham, aged 72. Elizabeth d. 1862 Oxford, aged 68. Children: Frederick Alphonso (1820-1902), Mary Ann (1822-1896), Richard Adolphus (1825), Elizabeth (1827-1902), Emily (1833-1872), Edward (1836-1893), James Adolphus (1838). A descendant says the Talboys were an `educated' family, who looked after Robert & Elizabeth's children, in later years]

 

@1820

8 February, Stockland, Dorset [Devon after 1844]: Ann Davey daughter of Richard & Hannah (Newberry), baptised. [m. William Beavis-Branscombe in Jersey, 1842, d. 1900 in Mudgee][208]

 

15 February, Topsham: Benjamin Ward Buttall Pearce, son of master mariner William of Topsham, & Margaret, is baptised.[209]

 

20 February, Cheriton Fitzpaine: Eliza & Sarah Ann, daughters of William & Sarah Branscombe, christened. (IGI)

 

25 March, Torquay: Robert Bowden Branscombe born, son of William the shoemaker & Ann(e).[210] [cf: 1836]

 

15 April, St.Martin's-in-the-Fields, Westminster: Walter Branscomb marries Sophia Brown. (IGI)

 

26 July, Wayne County, Kentucky: Wesley Branscomb marries Jane Dobbs.[211]

 

13 November, St.Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Mary Ann Branscombe marries James Davey, and Mary Branscomb marries Matthew Hudson. (IGI) [James Davey, husbandman.[212] cf: 1712]

 

Little Venice opens, and Regent's Canal.

 

1820's: Severe agricultural depression.

 

Britain's merchant marine is 2-2½ million tons.

 

`James Ladbroke was busying himself, in the 1820s, with plans and on an Act of Parliament for the layout of the great estate whose church, square, crescents and communal gardens were in due course to provide one of the last examples of London's great tradition of residential development.'[213]

 

`During the prime period [of the express post coach system] at the beginning of the 1820s, Carey's Itinerary shows that seven hundred and ninety-five mail and express passenger coaches spread out across the country from London every day of the week.'[214]

 

Possible year of marriage of Thomas Branscomb, labourer/warehouseman, & Mary Elizabeth ?, possibly in Whitechapel. Their son Henry (bp. 1825) marries Jane (Waterlow - m. 1849 Stepney). They run a hatters in Cambridge Road, Mile End. [poss m.21 July 1817, St.Mary's, Newington, Surrey, Mary Elizabeth Roxby? cf: 1824 Thomas Branscombe, china glass & earthenware dealer, 34 High Street, Mile End]

 

Children of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb

            Rebecca Branscomb                 11 Nov 21                   St.Mary,Whitechapel
            Emma Branscomb                    21 Dec 23                    St.Mary,Whitechapel
            Henry Branscomb                     21 Aug 25                    St.Mary,Whitechapel
            Eliza Branscomb                       12 Oct 28                    Sion Chapel,Mile End
            Matilda Branscomb                  18 Apr 30                    Sion Chapel,Mile End
            Thomas Branscomb                 
19 Jan 34                     Sion Chapel,Mile End
            Edwin Branscomb                   
25 Jun 37                     St.Dunstan,Stepney

 

Redbourne: Third great-grandfather James Halsey marries Elizabeth Bingham. [children: Elizabeth (1821?), James (1824?), George (1826?), Emmanuel (1827?) John (1829?), Ann (1833?), Thomas (1834?), Emma (1837?), Charles (1839?), Eliza (1843?)]

 

Approximate year of birth of Elizabeth ?, buried 1914 Appledore, aged 94, as Elizabeth Brownscombe. [cf: 1822 James Brownscombe b., d. 1867 Appledore]

 

Reign of George III ends (since 1760). George IV succeeds to the throne (to 1830).

 

Russelville, Logan County, Kentucky
Robert Branscomb

Greensville County, Virginia
Benjamin Brancomb
Edmund, Richard & Tabitha Branscomb
[215]       

 

@1821

19 January, Topsham: Robert Branscombe, bachelor fisherman of Topsham, marries spinster sojourner Amelia Clare, by banns. He signed his name, while she signed with a mark. Witnesses include Thomas & Harriett Garlick, (Peter Richards?), and one other whose name is indecipherable.[216] [Possibly Robert Bradford Branscombe, aged 40, son of mariner William & Jane (Pain - m. 1781 Topsham), described as a rope-maker in 1837 and a mariner in the 1851 census when he has moved to Littleham. He and Amelia had at least ten children: Susanna Mary (1821), Mary Jane Harriet (1822), William Clare (1824), George Eastman (1827), Robert (1829), Elizabeth or Amelia (1832), Harriet Garlick (1834), Susan & Sophia (1837), Thursa or Thirza (1838). Thomas Garlick, cordwainer, married Harriett Branscombe in Topsham, 1819. She may have been bp. 1793 Topsham, fourth child of William & Jane above, so sister to Robert Bradford]

 

2 January, Tiverton: Bartholomew Branscombe of Bampton, miller, makes his will. He bequeaths Grist Mills, with lands and orchard, in Elmore, Tiverton, to his son James, miller of Tiverton. Bartholomew signs with a mark.[217] [cf: 1833]

 

6 February, Topsham: Mary Martha (Heander?) Pearce, daughter of master mariner William of Topsham & Margaret (Heander?) Pearce, is baptised.[218] [cf: 1820]

 

9 March, St.Gregory's, Dawlish: William, son of Edward Branscombe, [painter &] glazier, & Ann [direct ancestors], baptised.[219] If not already there, at some time during the next five years, the family moves to Exeter, St. Sidwell's parish, from where they are removed in 1826.

 

27 March, Tiverton: Bartholomew Branscombe of Tiverton dies. His will is proved on 6 July, in Exeter. The effects are under £20. Legatees are his daughter Sarah, wife of John Rossiter of Tiverton, his grand-daughter Sarah, wife of Robert Pring of Tiverton, baker, £10. His grand-daughter Lucy, wife of Benjamin Harris `now residing in London', £10. His son James Branscombe of Tiverton, miller, all his Grist Mills situated near Elmore, Tiverton, `together with the field or close of land called Paradise Meadow and the orchard thereto now in the occupation of son James. And also two garden plots near Elmore now in occupation of James Turner as tenant. Witnesses are Fred O. Patch, James Turner and Jno Loosemore. Executor is James Branscombe of Tiverton, miller.[220] [Bartholomew brother of Sir James of Holborn?]

 

1 April, Topsham: Susanna Mary Branscombe, first child of mariner Robert & Amelia (Clare - m. 19 Jan. Topsham), baptised. (IGI) [possibly Robert Bradford Branscombe, aged 40, son of William & Jane (Pain), described as a fisherman on his marriage, as a rope-maker in 1837 and a mariner in the 1851 census when he has moved to Littleham. He and Amelia had at least ten children: Mary Jane Harriet (1822), William Clare (1824), George Eastman (1827), Robert (1829), Elizabeth or Amelia (1832), Harriet Garlick (1834), Susan & Sophia (1837), Thursa or Thirza (1838)]

 

28 May: R. Lucas, Curate of Holwell, Bedfordshire, conducts a survey of the population in his parish:[221] [cf: 1811]

 

inhabited houses:                                                        26 (+2)
families:
                                                                      29 (-1)
houses building:
                                                          0
houses uninhabited:
                                                    0 (-2)
families chiefly employed in agriculture:                   
ALL (+1)
families chiefly employed in trade etc:                      
0 (-1)
males:
                                                                          89 (+17)
females:
                                                                       90 (+15)
persons:
                                                                       179 (+32)

 

Macquarie Harbour opens as a convict prison.

 

Bishop Carey of Exeter's census of Devon parishes: Dawlish has 500 families. There are 3 or 4 Papists, and a few Calvinists and Dissenters, including a teacher who resides in the parish, and preaches in a licenced chapel.[222]

 

`Between 1811 and 1821 the population [of Exeter] increased from 18,896 to 23,479, that is by 23.8%. Some compensation for the loss of the cloth industry was found in the demand for the new houses, and also in work on the extension and improvement of the canal. Except in severe weather there was therefore employment for masons, plasterers, carpenters, bricklayers and allied trades, who together now formed the largest single element among Exeter's working class.

 

Towards the end of the 1820s the full daily wage for a skilled carpenter ranged from 3s 6d to 3s 8d Bricklayers were paid between 3s 6d and 3s 9d. (At Manchester about this time, bricklayers and carpenters were paid just over 4s) Plumbers working for Richard Rouse at the Corn Market in 1828 were paid 3s a day. In general therefore, skilled craftsmen were paid 18s to 22s 4d a week, provided employment lasted the full six days.'[223]

 

The population of Torquay is 5982, compared with 838 in 1801.[224]

 

27 August, Morchard Bishop: Frances Branscombe marries George Edwards by banns. Both of this parish. Witnesses are Jane Cape (by mark), John Mare & and William Oxnam.[225] [daughter of Joseph & Christian (Morrish - m. 1785), bp. 1795. cf: Frances' uncle John m. 1790, Agnes Mare. John Mare also a witness at Frances' half-sister Sophia's wedding in 1844. William Oxnam seems to witness all weddings in Morchard, at this time]

 

5 September, St.Sidwell's, Exeter: William Dacie, second child of William Branscombe, accomptant of St. Sidwell's parish, and Eliza (Dacie - m. 1817, Exeter), baptised. [siblings: Louisa (1819), Selina (1823), John Austwick (1825), Frederick (1827), Rev. George Henry Dacie (1831), Eliza Austwick (1834)]

 

9 September, Ottery St.Mary: Betsy Branscombe marries Richard Bending. Both of this parish.[226] [cf: 1851 census for Sandhill Street, Ottery St.Mary - Richard is a master tailor employing two men, born in Ottery, as was Betsy. He is aged 52, which would give his age at marriage about 22 and his birth year about 1799. Betsy is shown aged 61, giving a marriage age of 31 and a birth year of about 1790. The 1851 census also lists Joahanna Branscombe, aged 98, a widowed pauper & shopkeeper, as Richard's mother-in-law. This would tally with the baptism, in 1789 in Ottery, of Elizabeth, daughter of William & Johannah (Radford - m. 1784 Topsham). Johanna gives her place of birth as Whimple]

 

11 November, St.Mary, Whitechapel: Rebecca, first child of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb of High Street, baptised. She was born on 3 October. Thomas is said to be a labourer at the E.I. warehouse.[227] [East India warehouse? cf: 1824 Thomas Branscombe, china glass & earthenware dealer, 34 High Street, Mile End]

 

Children of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb

            Rebecca Branscomb                 11 Nov 21                   St.Mary,Whitechapel
            Emma Branscomb                    21 Dec 23                    St.Mary,Whitechapel
            Henry Branscomb                     21 Aug 25                    St.Mary,Whitechapel
            Eliza Branscomb                       12 Oct 28                    Sion Chapel,Mile End
            Matilda Branscomb                  18 Apr 30                    Sion Chapel,Mile End
            Thomas Branscomb                 
19 Jan 34                     Sion Chapel,Mile End
            Edwin Branscomb                   
25 Jun 37                     St.Dunstan,Stepney

 

Edward Branscombe, Clerk's Award, East Buckland. (EBMI) [cf: 1827 Edward Brownscombe buried, East Buckland, aged 68. (b. circa 1764?)]

 

Future site of Mudgee, N.S.W., discovered by Lt. William Lawson, who becomes a pioneer landowner there.

 

Approximate year of birth of John Branscombe, tanner, in Plymouth. [cf: 1851 census]

 

Redbourne: Approximate year of birth of Elizabeth Halsey, first child of third great-grandparents James & Elizabeth (Bingham - m. 1820 Redbourne). [Baptised 1827. Siblings: James (1824?), George (1826?), Emmanuel (1827?) John (1829?), Ann (1833?), Thomas (1834?), Emma (1837?), Charles (1839?), Eliza (1843?)]

 

St.Aldate's, Oxford: Approximate year of birth of Frederick Alphonso, first child of Robert Branscomb, tinman (b. 1785 London, d. 1858), & Eliza(beth) (Talboys - m. 1819 Oxford). [Frederick, a printer, m. 1839 in Oxford, Harriett Hitchcock, d. 1902 Birkenhead. Robert died 1858 in Birmingham, aged 72. Siblings: Mary Ann (1822-1896), Richard Adolphus (1825), Elizabeth (1827-1902), Emily (1833-1872), Edward (1836-1893), James Adolphus (1838). Children of Frederick & Harriet: (Iavav?) E (c.1842), Harriet L (c.1848), Frederick John Pennington (1849), Rosette (1851). A Frederick Bronscombe, 80, born Oxford, retired, is registered in the 1901 census for Birkenhead]

 

Greenslades Farm, on the east side of Crosspark Hill, Oakford, is leased to William Branscombe until 1823 or later.[228] [William & Grace? cf: 1823 son John Hinam b.]

 

Dawlish: approximate year Mary Beard born. [later wife of William Waymouth Branscombe - daughter of George Beard, builder of Dawlish, and Mary (Hoare - m. 1819 Dawlish?) cf: 1841 census]

 

@1822

20 January, St.Mary The Virgin, Sunbury-on-Thames: William Branscomb, son of labourer Edward & Sarah Branscomb, baptised.[229]

 

5 February, Tormoham, Torquay: Ann(e) Smith Waymouth Branscombe born to William, shoe-maker of Torquay, and Ann. Baptised Tormoham, 28 February 1822.

 

26 March, Exmouth: Newspaper report. `Devon Assizes. John Pidgely for stealing a rope from Richard Perriam at Exmouth, given 6 weeks imprisonment.'[230]

 

23 May, Bere Ferrers: John Gregory marries Elizabeth Branscumbe. Both of this parish.[231] [both signed with a mark. cf: 1830 Dawlish, Lewis Gregory m. Mary Ann Branscombe]

 

23 June, Withycombe Raleigh: Charlotte Branscombe, aged 6, buried.[232]

 

Monday, 1 July, Littleham: Robert Hooper, branch pilot at Exmouth, owner & master of the King George, pilot sloop, marries Miss Jane Perriam, daughter of Mrs Jane Perriam of the Swan Inn, Exmouth.[233]

 

9 July, North Molton: Richard Edward Branscombe Gibbs is baptised. [Richard’s sister was baptised Catherine Brownscombe Gibbs, also in North Molton. Their grandparents originated in North Molton. cf: 1831 North Molton, John Brownscombe marries Ann Gibbs] [234]

 

4 August, Withycombe Raleigh: John Branscombe, son of John, carpenter, & Elizabeth, baptised.[235]

 

30 August, Topsham: Mary Jane Harriot [Harriet?] Branscombe, second child of mariner Robert & Amelia (Clare - m. 1821 Topsham), is baptised. (IGI) [possibly Robert Bradford Branscombe, aged 40, son of William & Jane (Pain), described as a fisherman on his marriage, as a rope-maker in 1837 and a mariner in the 1851 census when he has moved to Littleham. He and Amelia had at least ten children: Susanna Mary (1821), William Clare (1824), George Eastman (1827), Robert (1829), Elizabeth or Amelia (1832), Harriet Garlick (1834), Susan & Sophia (1837), Thursa or Thirza (1838)]

 

11 September, St.Leonard's, Shoreditch: Edward Richard, James Francis & Mary, children of Thomas & Sarah Branscomb, baptised.[236] [cf: 1880 Edward Richard Branscombe, stoker, is executor of the will of Mary Branscombe of Walworth. Edward poss d. 1887 Camberwell?]

 

16 October, Dawlish: Fourth Great Uncle Edward Branscombe, aged 70 years, buried.[237] [son of Edward & Elizabeth née Pearce][238]

 

Approximate year Henry Firman Salmon, father of Edward George Branscombe [George Edward Salmon] is born in Rochford, Essex, to Henry, wine merchant.[239]

 

William Cobbett begins his "rural rides" [to 1826].

 

St.Aldate's, Oxford: Approximate date of birth of Mary Ann, second child of tinman Robert Branscomb (b. 1786 London) & Eliza(beth) (Talboys - m. 1819 Oxford).[240] [Remained a spinster. Became a matron and house-keeper to Summerfield Preparatory School, Oxford, established by her cousin Gertrude (Talboys) husband, Archibald MacLaren. Died in 1896 and buried in the same grave as Archibald and Gertrude. Siblings: Frederick Alphonso (1820-1902), Richard Adolphus (1825), Elizabeth (1827-1902), Emily (1833-1872), Edward (1836-1893), James Adolphus (1838). In the 1881 census for Oxford, Mary Ann is listed as Marianne. Her approximate year of birth, judging from her age, is 1826. She gives her birth parish as Summertown]

 

Chalon-sur-Saône: Joseph Nicéphore Niepce fixes an image on a glass plate and claims to have invented photography.

 

Approximate year of birth of James Brownscombe, buried in Appledore, aged 45, in 1867. [cf: 1820 Elizabeth b., d. 1914 Appledore]

 

@1823

11 January, Oakford, Bampton: John Hinam Branscombe born, son of William & Grace.[241] [John m. 1855, d. 1895. William probably farmer son of William & Sarah, b. 1789, m?, d. 1835]

 

8 February, Whimple: William Branscombe marries Elisabeth Granger. (IGI) [cf: 1825 for possible duplication. Probably the fourth child of John & Alice (Mitchell - m. 1791 Broad Clyst?) of Whimple, baptised 22 March 1801. Also cf: 1767 Woodbury, William Branscombe m. Ann Granger]

 

25 March, Newcastle: William Doubleday born. Becomes a master mariner in 1846.[242] [poss relative of Mary Doubleday, m. 1844 Samuel Branscombe of Hastings?]

 

25 May, Headington, Oxford: Mary Branscomb marries William Day. (IGI) [cf: 1824 St.Aldates, Oxford, Ann Branscomb buried, aged 75]

 

21 June, Van Diemen's Land: Thomas Anstey, aged 46, arrives from Gravesend with his wife and three children on board the Berwick.[243] He is given 2560 acres on a tributary of the Jordan River near Oatlands, which he called Anstey Park. The fine home he built was called Anstey Barton.[244] He died in Oatlands, 23 March 1851, aged 73.[245]  [b. 1777, Highercombe near Dulverton, Somerset, to John Anstey and Elizabeth née Branscombe. Refs. also to Jorgen Jorgenson, Sorell, Lake Dulverton. Judy Hellstrom [246] claims Thomas Branscombe, Anstey’s “cousin” arrived on the same ship. She also says Thomas Branscombe’s sister, Eliza, emigrated to Tasmania after 1838 and was pursued by Charles Hazell, a former tea-taster in John Branscombe’s Pall Mall tea emporium. Charles married Eliza in Hobart, in 1843. cf: 1824 Thomas Branscombe granted land in “Dalverton”]

 

17 September, St. Sidwell's, Exeter: Selina, third child of William Branscombe, common carrier of St. Sidwell's parish, and Eliza (Dacie - m. 1817, Exeter), baptised. (IGI) [In 1821 William was described as an accomptant. Siblings: Louisa (1819), William Dacie (1821), John Austwick (1825), Frederick (1827), Rev. George Henry Dacie (1831), Eliza Austwick (1834)]]

 

22 September, Bratton Fleming: The will of Mary Brownscomb is proved in the Court of the Archdeaconry of Barnstaple.[247] [cf: 1819, William of Bratton Fleming also]

 

2 October, Exeter: Thomas Fox, fourth child of third great-grandparents Edward & Ann (Starling - m. 1817, Dartmouth) Branscombe of Dawlish, born. [becomes a plasterer - m. Mary Hill 1855, Notting Hill. Thomas d. 1907 Uxbridge] Between the birth of Susan in 1819 and 1823, the family has moved from Dawlish to exeterSt. Sidwell's parish, Exeter. Ann Starling's great-aunt merrygame, Mary Merrygame married foxThomas Fox in 1747. foxMary Fox was a witness at Ann & Edward Branscombe's marriage, in 1817. Thomas is not baptised until 1828, in Tormoham, Torquay]

 

12 November, Brunswick County, Virginia: Thomas Branscomb marries Mary Ann Wyatt.[248]

 

20 November, Grayson County, Virginia: Tabitha Branscom marries Samuel Maberry.[249]

 

21 December, St.Mary, Whitechapel: Emma, daughter of labourer Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb of High Street, baptised. Born 24 September.[250] [m. 1846 Grenwich? cf: 1824 Thomas Branscombe, china glass & earthenware dealer, 34 High Street, Mile End]

 

Children of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb

            Rebecca Branscomb                 11 Nov 21                   St.Mary,Whitechapel
            Emma Branscomb                    21 Dec 23                    St.Mary,Whitechapel
            Henry Branscomb                     21 Aug 25                    St.Mary,Whitechapel
            Eliza Branscomb                       12 Oct 28                    Sion Chapel,Mile End
            Matilda Branscomb                  18 Apr 30                    Sion Chapel,Mile End
            Thomas Branscomb                 
19 Jan 34                     Sion Chapel,Mile End
            Edwin Branscomb                   
25 Jun 37                     St.Dunstan,Stepney

 

23 December, Topsham: William Clare Branscombe born, son of Robert & Amelia (Clare - m. 1821 Topsham). Baptised 17 March 1825.[251] [possibly Robert Bradford Branscombe, aged 40, son of William & Jane (Pain), described as a fisherman on his marriage, as a rope-maker in 1837 and a mariner in the 1851 census when he has moved to Littleham. He and Amelia had at least ten children: Susanna Mary (1821), Mary Jane Harriet (1822), George Eastman (1827), Robert (1829), Elizabeth or Amelia (1832), Harriet Garlick (1834), Susan & Sophia (1837), Thursa or Thirza (1838)]

 

`A map of London, published [in this year], exhibits Paddington as quite distinct from the metropolis, which has the Edgeware Road as its western boundary. A rivulet is marked as running from north to south through Green, parallel with Craven Place; and House is marked with the name of its resident owner, Mr. (cockerell, Samuel Pepys] Cockerell, just like a country manor house fifty miles from London; while half a mile further are two isolated farms, named and Notting Barns respectively.'[252]

 

The first iron steamboat is trialed, on the Thames.[253]

 

Approximate year Jane Beard, daughter of plumber John, is born in Saxmundham, Suffolk. She marries Henry Firman Salmon in 1846 and produces a (second?) son, Edward George Branscombe [George Edward Salmon], in 1864.[254]

 

Thomas Bransome, farmer of Chalgrove, Tebworth, Bedfordshire - probate record.[255]

 

Steyning, Sussex: Approximate year of birth of Mary Branscombe, registered as a housemaid in the 1851 census for Argyll House, 7 Argyll Street, Golden Square sub-district, the home of George G -?, the Earl of Aberdeen.

 

Frankfort Street, Plymouth: William Branscombe listed as a tanner & glue manufacturer  in the 1823/4 Pigot’s Directory.

 

1824

16 January, Greensville County, Virginia: Eliza L Branscom marries William B Allen.[256]

 

2 February, Van Diemen's Land: Thomas Branscombe granted 3000 acres in Dalverton parish.[257] [poss Dulverton? Thomas Anstey, b. 1777, Highercombe near Dulverton, Somerset, to John Anstey and Elizabeth née Branscombe, emigrated to Van Diemen's Land with his wife and three children, arriving June 1823, aged 46. He was given 2560 acres on a tributary of the Jordan River near Oatlands, which he called Anstey Park. The fine home he built was called Anstey Barton.[258] He died in Oatlands, 23 March 1851, aged 73.[259] Refs.also to Jorgen Jorgenson, Sorell, Lake Dulverton. A Thomas Branscombe m. 1827 Hobart, Hannah Regan. Thomas & his wife were registered in the 1837 census at New Town. A Hannah Branscombe d. 1873 Hobart, aged 87. Thomas Branscombe also owned land at Glenorchy (1841) & Melville (1844). A Sarah Branscomb d. 1865 Oatlands]

 

19 February, Morchard Bishop: Abraham Branscombe of Street buried, aged 87.[260] [b. 1737 Morchard, son of John, serge-maker? Poss m. 1758 Morchard, Frances Southcott?]

 

17 June, Dawlish: John Branscombe, aged 77 years, buried.[261] [b. about 1747? possibly husband of Agnes Pike, m. 1781 Dawlish? Poss father of John (1782-1795), Captn. Joseph (1784-1866), Anne (1787-1787), Sarah (1790-1849), Catherine (1793-1855), John (1796), Anne (1798), Captn. William (1803)?]

 

26 August, Wolborough: John Branscombe of Wolborough marries Sarah Alsop of Wolborough, by licence.[262] [this could be John the draper, bp. 1789 Highweek, firstborn child of John & Mary (Mountstephen - m. 1787 Wolborough). They may have had a child called Sarah, who is born about 1827. She is recorded living with John in the household of Richard Beard, photographer husband of John's sister Elizabeth, in the 1851 census]

 

September: oxley, John Oxley lands at the future site of Brisbane.

 

9 October, Ipswich, Suffolk Emily Womack Ridley born, future wife of John Hinam Branscombe of Bampton. [m. 1855 Islington][1]

 

14 October, St.Aldate's, Oxford: Ann Branscomb buried, aged 75.[264]

 

5 November, Topsham: George Branscombe born. Goes to sea in 1839 as a Boy, served six months in the Royal Navy and is issued his seaman's ticket in 1845.[265] [cf: 1826]

 

Imperial Gas Company; introduces first gas supply to Paddington:

 

`Up to this time, during the long winter evenings, the muddy roads which led to the cottages on the Paddington estate were in total darkness, unless the "parish lantern" chanced to offer its acceptable light.'[266]

 

St.Gregory's, Dawlish, is re-built. `The east lychgate ... was removed, and an adjoining house, the property of Mr.James Hexter (b. 1758, m. 1782?), was purchased for £60.'[267]

 

Redbourne: Approximate year of birth of James Halsey, second child of third great-grandparents James & Elizabeth (Bingham - m. 1820 Redbourne). [Baptised 1827. Siblings: Elizabeth (1821?), George (1826?), Emmanuel (1827?) John (1829?), Ann (1833?), Thomas (1834?), Emma (1837?), Charles (1839?), Eliza (1843?)]

 

The  Bank of Englandd loses its monopoly on joint-stock banking.

 

Newton Bushel? Approximate year of birth of Frank Branscombe, listed in the 1841 census for Shoreditch as an apprentice wood-turner to Gilbert Clampit. Neither were born in Middlesex. A Frank Branscombe, engraver, son of Richard, clerk, married Ann Bartlett, in 1856 Chelsea. In the 1881 census for Berkampstead, a Frank of the right age is a wood-turner. He may d. 1907, Christchurch district?

 

Heavitree: a Poor Rate survey shows a Mrs Branscombe living in a house owned by Mr S. Hore, worth £12 a year. She does not appear in the 1838 and 1854 surveys.[268] [cf: 1818 John Branscombe of Heavitree, joiner & sub-postmaster]

 

PIGOT'S 1823-24 DIRECTORY OF LONDON

Thomas Branscombe    china glass & earthenware dealer
                                               
34 High Street, Mile End

[poss bp. 1799 Morchard Bishop? Described in 1823 as a labourer, in the register of St.Mary, Whitechapel, on the baptism of his second child, Emma]

 

Thomas Telford recommends the building of a ship canal from the Bristol to English Channels.

 

@1825

3 January, Torquay: William Waymouth Branscombe born.[269] [cf: 1840. Granted Captain’s ticket 1855]

 

6 January, St. Bride's, Fleet Street: Sarah Branscomb marries John Currie. (IGI)

 

15 January: Arthur, of New Brunswick; Branscombe [b. about 1751 Devon?] dies `in his new home in the wilderness' and is buried at Grand Lake, New Brunswick, Canada, aged 74.[270]

 

8 February, Whimple: William Branscombe marries Elisabeth Granger. Both of Whimple.[271] [cf: 1823 for possible duplication. Also cf: 1767 Woodbury, William Branscombe m. Ann Granger]

 

9 March, India: Eliza Branscombe is registered as a servant to Mrs Ann Coppin. [272]

 

12 March, Wolborough: Marriage of Elizabeth Branscombe [b. 1797 Highweek, daughter of John & Mary (Mountstephen - m. 1787 Wolborough)] to Richard Beard junior, grocer, by licence. Both of Wolborough.[273] [sister of John Branscombe, draper - cf: 1851 census for St. Pancras - Richard becomes a coal dealer, one of Britain's pioneer photographers, and a "medical galvanist"]

 

17 March, Topsham: William Clare Branscombe, third child of mariner Robert & Amelia (Clare - m. 1821), baptised. (IGI) [Presbyterian Church. William was born 23 December 1823. Father possibly Robert Bradford Branscombe, aged 40, son of William & Jane (Pain), described as a fisherman on his marriage, as a rope-maker in 1837 and a mariner in the 1851 census when he has moved to Littleham. He and Amelia had at least ten other children: Susanna Mary (1821), Mary Jane Harriet (1822), George Eastman (1827), Robert (1829), Elizabeth or Amelia (1832), Harriet Garlick (1834), Susan & Sophia (1837), Thursa or Thirza (1838)]

 

20 March, East Buckland: Mary Brownscombe, aged 25, is buried.[274] [cf: 1821 Edward Brownscombe, Clerk's Award, East Buckland, 1827 Edward & William Brownscombe, 1832 Susan Brownscombe & 1834 Catherine Brownscombe, all buried East Buckland]

 

2 April, Withycombe Raleigh?: William Branscombe, son of Mary Ann Branscombe, spinster, born [bap.1827]. William emigrates to Australia with his family in 1854, and becomes a tinsmith in Mudgee, where he is buried.[275]

 

21 August, St. Mary, Whitechapel: Henry, son of labourer (E.I.H? = East India H? - Thomas is called a warehouseman on Henry's 1849 marriage certificate) Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb of High Street, baptised. Born 30 June.[276] [becomes a hatter - marries Jane Waterlow 1849 - dies between 1862-1870]

 

Children of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb

            Rebecca Branscomb                 11 Nov 21                   St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Emma Branscomb                    21 Dec 23                    St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Henry Branscomb                     21 Aug 25                    St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Eliza Branscomb                       12 Oct 28                    Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Matilda Branscomb                  18 Apr 30                    Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Thomas Branscomb                  19 Jan 34                     Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Edwin Branscomb                    25 Jun 37                     St. Dunstan, Stepney

 

26 August, St. Sidwell's, Exeter: John Austwick, fourth child of William Branscombe, common carrier of St. Sidwell's parish, & Eliza (Dacie - m. 1817, Exeter), christened. (IGI) [Dalby says this middle name is Answick.[277] Siblings: Louisa (1819), William Dacie (1821), Selina (1823), Frederick (1827), Rev. George Henry Dacie (1831), Eliza Austwick (1834). William senior d.1859 Paddington]

 

1 September, Tiverton: R. Voysey, glazier & plumber, dies.[278]

 

22 December, Newton Abbot: Report of a fire on the premises of  Samuel Branscombe, tanner.[279]

 

Charles Pearse, plumber of Topsham, has premises in Fore Street, (Exeter/Topsham?).[280] [In 1879, James Crocker sketches a ceiling and fireplace at #171 Fore Street, Exeter, then the showroom of messrs. James Pearse & Co.][281]

 

The repeal of a law preventing export of machinery and skilled men from England results in the export of textile machinery to India and North America, forming the basis of new industry in those countries.

 

The Bubble Act of 1720 is repealed. There is a financial crash in Britain - many English banks fail.

 

Oxford: Approximate year of birth of Richard Adolphus, third child of Robert Branscomb (b. 1786 London), tinman, & Eliza(beth) (Talboys - m. 1819 Oxford).[282] [Siblings: Frederick Alphonso (1820-1902), Mary Ann (1822-1896), Elizabeth (1827-1902), Emily (1833-1872), Edward (1836-1893), James Adolphus (1838)]

 

@1826

A year of widespread unemployment and distress. [cf: 1837]

 

`... over a thousand power looms were destroyed in the area around Blackburn and Bury.'[283]

 

26 January: An order to the chuchwardens and overseers of the poor in St. Sidwell's parish, Exeter and in Dawlish, for the removal of Edward & Ann Branscombe and their children from Exeter to Dawlish. The order is signed on behalf of the City of Exeter by the mayor of Exeter, ?W. Payne?, and a J.P., ?Thomas Froud? It names Edward, Ann, Ann Starling aged 8 years, Susan aged 6, William aged 5 and Thomas aged 2. It says Dawlish was place of their last legal settlement. The order is made under the provisions of the Poor Law.  A second document, dated the same day, refers to the family as paupers. It notes a suspension of the removal order has been granted because Edward is ill.

 

11 February, Exeter: Second Great Grandfather Edward Branscombe, third son of Edward & Ann (Starling - m. 1817, Dartmouth), born. [baptised Tormoham 1828]

 

4 March: A second removal order, signed by the same people. It states Edward is now well enough to travel. It also includes a bill to Dawlish churchwardens and overseers of the poor of £12.5.2, being expenses incurred in keeping the family at public expense in the interim, to be paid to William Smallridge.

 

9 March, Dawlish: The minutes of a Select Vestry meeting of the churchwardens and overseers of the poor contain the following note -

 

`It is agreed to pay Edward Branscom £3.10.0 in need, and to allow him and his family 10/- per week while (ill? jaundice?)'

 

They would normally have ended up at a workhouse, under the Poor Law [is this true at this date? cf: 1834], but may have gone to Torquay, to brother William, as Edward was baptised in Torquay.  To qualify for removal, the Branscombes must have been resident in Exeter for less than one year, or Edward must not have been in continuous work, or he was self-employed. Temporary or permanent shifts of settlement required certificates from the parish of origin. Removals sometimes followed arrival without such certification. The removal order was always to the last place of legal settlement, not always the parish of birth. There was a hearing before a magistrate to determine the last legal place of settlement, and to generate the paperwork.

 

14 May, Topsham: George Branscombe born. Goes to sea as a Boy in 1838, awarded seaman's ticket in 1848.[284] [cf: 1824,1848]

 

25 June, St. Marylebone parish church: John, son of John & Mary Branscomb, baptised.[285] [cf: 1814 Maria Mary born]

 

16 July, Bratton Fleming: Ann, daughter of Thomas Brownscombe, christened. (IGI)

 

29 July, Withycombe Raleigh?: Sarah Ann Branscombe, daughter of Mary Ann, spinster, born.[286]

 

29 August, Kingsbridge: Elizabeth Branscombe of Kingsbridge marries scrivener Francis Collins of St. Andrew's, Plymouth, by licence.[287] [parents of writer Mortimer Collins, b. 1827 Plymouth? Elizabeth was born in Kingsbridge in 1791, second child of William & Charlotte (Mortimer - m. 1789 Wolborough). By 1851, Elizabeth was a widow, as she is registered in the census of that year at Ringmore, Shaldon, living with her sister Ann. Also cf 1881 census: Patience Collins, aged 39, b. West Indies, living off investments, is living at Warberry Villa, Warberry Lane, St. Marychurch, Torquay, in the household of Martha Branscombe (Crouch - m. 1865, third wife of William Branscombe the shoemaker)]

 

14 September, Whimple: Peternella Branscombe marries William Pratt. Both of Whimple.[288] [Petronella? cf: 1806 - probably sixth child of John & Alice of Whimple]

 

30 September, Van Diemen's Land: Thomas Branscombe is a tenant and agent at Kensington.[289] [cf: 1832 a Thomas is owner of a farm at O'Brian's Bridge]

 

Governor Arthur is appointed to sort out the chaos of bushrangers and administrative disorder, in Van Diemen's Land.

 

The first permanent photographic image is produced by Joseph Neipce. [cf: Fox-Talbot 1835].

 

William Halsey, bricklayer, lives in Berkhampstead, Hertfordshire.[290] [cf: 1841 census]

 

`The first really successful reaper was brought out in 1826 by Patrick Bell of Forfarshire ... his reaper was pushed by horses, and not pulled behind them ... Before the introduction of mechanical reaping more labour per unit was required for harvesting than for any other task on the farm. It was customary to hire extra labour every year to harvest the crops.'[291]

 

Year of birth of Henry Voysey, master bootmaker of Portsmouth, father of Edwin George Voysey, master shoemaker. [1863-1941: traded in Gosport & Portsmouth][292]

 

State-run lotteries are wound up. Private lotteries were banned in England in 1698. `... even though they had helped finance such worthy schemes as fresh-water supplies for London. Politicians were worried about the evils of gambling, and the Treasury found it hard to control the profits of the private firms contracted to run the lotteries.'[293]

 

Redbourne: Approximate year of birth of George Halsey, third child of third great-grandparents James & Elizabeth (Bingham - m. 1820 Redbourn). [Baptised 1827. Siblings: Elizabeth (1821?), James (1824?), Emmanuel (1827?) John (1829?), Ann (1833?), Thomas (1834?), Emma (1837?), Charles (1839?), Eliza (1843?)]

 

Bideford: Edwin Browncombe born. Married 1853, Gloucestershire, Sarah Martin Mountjoy. [294][cf: 1829 duplicate entry]

 

@1827

13 January, Topsham: George Eastman, fourth child of Robert & Amelia (Clare - m. 1821 Topsham) Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Father possibly Robert Bradford Branscombe, aged 40, son of William & Jane (Pain), described as a fisherman on his marriage, as a rope-maker in 1837 and a mariner in the 1851 census when he has moved to Littleham. He and Amelia had at least ten other children: Susanna Mary (1821), Mary Jane Harriet (1822), William Clare (1824), Robert (1829), Elizabeth or Amelia (1832), Harriet Garlick (1834), Susan & Sophia (1837), Thursa or Thirza (1838)]

 

22 January, Withycombe Raleigh: Mary Ann Branscombe, daughter of William & Sarah, marries Josias Knight Beavis, blacksmith. She was his third wife, and his junior by 31 years. Although the register describes her as a spinster, Mary Ann had three children baptised on the day of her marriage: George (b.3 November 1819), William (b.2 April 1825), and Sarah Ann (b.29 July 1826). They were all baptised as Branscombe, although they immediately adopted the name Beavis. There is no direct evidence Josias was the father of all or any of them, but he did leave his business to George, which may indicate he was the natural heir. Josias and Ann produced two children after their marriage, Charlotte and Josias Knight.[295] [cf: 1841 census]

 

1 February, Dawlish: Joseph Branscombe marries Hannah Williams.[296] [Master mariner in the merchant service, yeoman farmer & owner of houses. b. 1784 Dawlish, son of John & Agnes (Pike - m. 1781 Dawlish). Poss siblings: John (1782-1795), Anne (1787-1787), Sarah (1790-1849), Catherine (1793-1855), John (1796), Anne (1798), Captn. William (1803)? Hannah dies, Dawlish, 1831. Joseph dies, Dawlish, 1866]

 

19 February, Bampton: James Branscombe, son of William [d.1828] dies, aged 29.[297] [possibly Chelmsford tea-dealer, husband of Susan & father of Susan, brother of Eliza, Sarah, Francis [draper], Thomas, William, Robert, John [tea-dealer], & Richard [lime-merchant/farmer?]

 

25 February, Torquay?: Elizabeth Webber Branscombe born. [daughter of William, bootmaker of Torquay?]

 

15 March, East Buckland: William Brownscombe aged 30 is buried.[298] [cf: 17 December this year - Edward Brownscombe, aged 68, buried, East Buckland. Also cf: 1821 Edward Brownscombe, Clerk's Award, East Buckland. Also 1825, Mary Brownscombe, 1832 Susan Brownscombe & 1834 Catherine Brownscombe, both buried East Buckland]

 

22 March, Hobart, Tasmania: Thomas Branscombe marries Hannah Regan.[299] [poss second marriage for Thomas, as Hannah is probably aged about 38 or 41, if she is the same Hannah Branscombe who dies in Hobart in 1873, aged 84 or 87]

 

25 March, Withycombe Raleigh: Sarah Ann Branscombe, daughter of John, carpenter, & Elizabeth, baptised.[300]

 

(16/18?) May, Wayne County, Kentucky: (Hiram/Henry?) Branscomb marries Elizabeth Burris.[301]

 

29 June, Plymouth: Poet & novelist Mortimer Collins born, son of a Plymouth solicitor. [probably the first child of Francis & Elizabeth (Branscombe - m. 1826 Kingsbridge)]

 

2 August, Wolborough, Newton Abbot: Samuel Branscombe of Highweek marries Mary Hannaford of Wolborough, by licence.[302] [b. 1805 Newton Bushel, only child of Samuel (b. 1780 Highweek - d. 1805 in Highweek) & ? (poss Mary Perrett - m. 1803 Paignton?). Samuel & Mary become parents of Samuel Hannaford Branscombe (bp. 1828 Newton Bushel), draper of Northants. Samuel d.1858, Mary d.1857]

 

2 August, Wayne County, Kentucky: Isaac Branscomb marries Ruth Gregory.[303]

 

23 August, Holy Trinity, Exeter: Harriet Underhill (Branscombe?), daughter of labourer Thomas (Branscombe?) & Mary Underhill of Magdelen Street, baptised privately. Married Andrew Badgery, 29 August 1849 as Harriet Underhill Branscombe, giving her father as Thomas Branscombe, farmer. But the birth certificates of her 9 children gave her maiden name as Underhill. She was also unsure of her birthplace. In 1851 it is St. David's, Exeter; in 1861/71 Ide; in 1881 Exeter. Her mother, Mary, describes herself as unmarried in all censuses except 1871, when she says she is a widow. She is described as the daughter, not the daughter-in-law of William & Joanna. Each of her three other children named a different father.[304] [siblings of Harriet: Anna Maria (b. 1829), William Thomas (bp. 1834), John (b. 1838, d.1858)]

 

11 September, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Henry Branscombe, tanner of Kingsbridge, marries Mary Crouch of St. Andrew's, by licence, with consent of (Mary's?) parents.[305] [she was underage? Henry may have been born in 1806, Kingsbridge, the fifth child of tanner William Branscombe & Charlotte (Mortimer - m. 1789 Wolborough)? Poss children: Elizabeth (1830-1835), Mary Crouch (1835-1853), Elizabeth (1837)]

 

11 September, St. Sidwell's, Exeter: Frederick Branscombe, fifth child of William Branscombe, gentleman of St. Sidwell's parish, & Eliza (Dacie - m. 1817, Exeter), christened. [William is described as an accomptant in 1821 and a common carrier in 1823 & 1825. This Frederick is the only candidate so far for Frederick George Branscombe, house decorator/oil & colorman of Chelsea & Mayfair, m. 1850 Elizabeth ? Siblings: Louisa (1819), William Dacie (1821), Selina (1823), John Austwick (1825), Rev. George Henry Dacie (1831), Eliza Austwick (1834)]]

 

30 September, Sundon [nr. Dunstable], Bedfordshire: Elizabeth Ann Brancom baptised, daughter of Thomas & Mary. (IGI)

 

4 October, St. Peter's, Exeter: Betty Branscombe marries Henry Rowe. Both of Cathedral Close.[306] [George Rowe, artist, born 1796 - spent some time on the goldfields of Victoria, Australia - any relation?][307]

 

6 December, Bampton: William Branscombe, yeoman, makes his will. [proved 4 September 1828][308]

 

16 December, St. Aldate's, Oxford: William Branscombe is buried, aged 66.[309] [cf: 1824 St. Aldate's, Ann Branscomb buried, aged 75. William poss bp. 1762 Clyst St. George, son of William and Elizabeth Branscomb, poss William & Elizabeth (Chapple - m. 1757 Clyst?). This may have been their only son and Elizabeth may have died in childbirth?]

 

17 December, East Buckland: Edward Brownscombe, aged 68, is buried.[310] [poss will proved in Barnstaple Archdeaconry, 25 January 1829? cf: 15 March this year - William Brownscombe, aged 30, buried, East Buckland. Also cf: 1821 Edward Brownscombe, Clerk's Award, East Buckland. And cf: 1825, Mary Brownscombe, 1832 Susan Brownscombe & 1834 Catherine Brownscombe, both buried East Buckland]

 

Newton Abbot: Approximate year of birth of Sarah Branscombe, who is registered as an unmarried fund-holder and head of household at 4 Mount Pleasant, Wolborough, in the 1881 census. This may be the daughter of John Branscombe of Newton Bushel. Both are registered in the Mecklenburgh Square household of photographer Richard Beard, in 1851. Richard is married to John's sister and Sarah is described as a neice, which could mean she is the daughter of John, who is a widower by this time, or his brothers Samuel, Richard or Philip. It may be the same Sarah who dies a spinster at 9 Mount Pleasant, Wolborough, in 1899, aged 71.

 

Approximate year of birth of Ann Branscombe, who is a 14 year-old female servant in the household of tailor William Clay of Littleham, in the 1841 census.

 

St. Aldate's, Oxford: Approximate year of birth of Elizabeth, fourth child of Robert Branscomb (b. 1786 London), tinman, & Eliza(beth) (Talboys - m. 1819 Oxford). [Elizabeth junior poss living in Abingdon and working as a music teacher, in the 1851 census for North & South Hinksey. Lived in Park Lane, Aston when she was married, in 1868, in  Birmingham, to Charles Hunt. According to a descendent, she later ran a school for young ladies. When teaching piano, she used to tap the child's knuckles with a ruler, every time there was a wrong note. When Queen Victoria died, she burst into tears and said, "Oh, the dear Queen - how I shall miss her!". She died 14 May 1902.[311] Siblings: Frederick Alphonso (1820-1902), Mary Ann (1822-1896), Richard Adolphus (1825), Emily (1833-1872), Edward (1836-1893), James Adolphus (1838)][312]

 

Redbourne: Approximate year of birth of Emmanuel Halsey, fourth child of third great-grandparents James & Elizabeth (Bingham - m. 1820 Redbourn). [Baptised 1827. Siblings: Elizabeth (1821?), James (1824?), George (1826?), John (1829?), Ann (1833?), Thomas (1834?), Emma (1837?), Charles (1839?), Eliza (1843?)]

 

Morchard Bishop: Approximate year of birth of Eliza Branscombe, registered in the 1851 census a 24 year old unmarried assistant in a linen drapers in Milsom Street, Bath.

 

@1828

January, Van Diemen's Land: Thomas Branscombe granted land in Buckingham County.

 

Sunday, 20 January, Carbonear, Newfoundland: Mr. William Branscombe marries Margaret, daughter of the late Mr. James Kennedy of Carbonear. Married by the Rev. Mr. Devereaux.[313] [according to the Summers documents, James Kennedy had two sons and five daughters. William was described as a "planter and landholder" of St. Johns. In 1829, premises in St. Johns owned by him or his father William, were leased for £140 a year, which would indicate a large establishment. A William may, in the 1830s, have been involved in the mercantile firm of William Wilking Bulley and Thomas Chancey, in Conception Bay. A William was a prominent member of St. Johns "society" until the 1850s] [314]

 

12 March, Edmonton: Richard Branscombe born. Is apprenticed to the sea in 1845. In that year, his address is given as 2 Ely Place, Edmonton.[315] [cf: 1845]

 

13 March: Branscombe senior, tanner of Gittisham/Kingsbridge/Plymouth, discharged.[316] [bankrupt? - cf: 1816 William Branscombe junior bankrupt in Plymouth - Samuel Branscombe, tanner of Newton Abbot 1825. Also 1848 - Agnes, widow of William Branscombe junior of Kingsbridge, dies in Stoke Damerel]

 

11 April, Bampton: William Branscombe, yeoman farmer, dies aged 73. Executors are John Branscombe of 88 Pall Mall, tea-dealer and Richard Branscombe of Bampton, yeoman [sons]. Proved 4 September 1828, Exeter. Effects under £600. Testator confirms marriage bond to wife Sarah Branscombe [d.1837] for £200 and gives her a further sum of £400. His daughters Sarah Greenaway and Eliza get £150. His farmer son William Branscombe [d.1835 - husband of Grace -?, father of John Hinam, draper] gets an annuity of £5 per annum out of lands in Birch Down, Bampton. Other sons mentioned are Thomas, Richard [above], Robert and Francis [draper, d.1863 Marylebone]. Also mentioned is Susan Branscombe, daughter of James Branscombe, son of testator [d.1827]. The residue of the estate to sons Richard and John Branscombe [above]. Will made and signed 6 December 1827. Witnesses John Partridge of Tiverton, Thomas Tarrant and John Edwards.[317]

 

21 April Tormoham, Torquay?: Joanna, sixth child of Edward & Ann (Starling - m. 1817, Dartmouth) Branscombe [direct ancestors], born. She is baptised privately on 3 May, possibly because she was not expected to live. [she died, aged 5, in 1833]

 

25 April, Newton Bushel: Samuel Hannaford Branscombe, son of Samuel [b.Newton Bushel 1805] & Mary Hannaford [b.Kingsbridge 1808, m. 1827 Wolborough], is born.[318] [1st m. 1861, 2nd m. 1865. d.1874 Chelveston, Northants., a draper]

 

8 June, Tormoham, Torquay: A triple Branscombe baptism. Joanna [6 weeks old - d.1833], is baptised for the second time, also Thomas Fox, aged 4 [b. 2 Oct 1823 Exeter], and second great- grandfather Edward, aged 2, children of third great-grandparents Edward & Ann (Starling - m. 1817, Dartmouth).

 

7 July, Greensville County, Virginia: Enoch Branscom marries Margaret Richardson.[319]

 

18 July, All Saints, Highweek: John Branscombe buried, aged 68.[320] [husband of Mary, d.1834]

 

19 July, St. George's, Hanover Square: George Ley Branscombe marries Mary Davis.[321] [George Ley bp. 1808 St. Austell, Cornwall, son of William & Elizabeth Branscombe, poss. William, yeoman m. 1807 Stoke Damarel, Elizabeth Steer?]

 

12 October, Sion Chapel, Union Street, (Lady Huntingdon's)-Nc, Mile End Old Town: Eliza, daughter of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb, baptised.[322] [m. 1850 John Scarlett Gale, wood-turner]

 

Children of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb

            Rebecca Branscomb                 11 Nov 21                   St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Emma Branscomb                    21 Dec 23                    St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Henry Branscomb                     21 Aug 25                    St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Eliza Branscomb                       12 Oct 28                    Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Matilda Branscomb                  18 Apr 30                    Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Thomas Branscomb                  19 Jan 34                     Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Edwin Branscomb                    25 Jun 37                     St. Dunstan, Stepney

 

24 October, St. Luke's, Old Street, Finsbury: Hellen, daughter of John & Mary Branscomb, baptised.[323] [cf: 1818 birth of brother John, 1840 - John & Emma Scales marry]

 

Plumbers working for rouse, Richard Rouse at the Corn Market, Exeter, in 1828 were paid 3s a day. In general therefore, skilled craftsmen were paid 18s to 22s 4d a week, provided employment lasted the full six days.'[324]

 

Stanton, Suffolk: Approximate year of birth of Eliza(beth), wife of Frederick George Branscombe. Married 1850 St. George Hanover Square district. Mother of Elizabeth (b. about 1851 Chelsea), George William (b. about 1855, oil & colorman), & Horatio Arthur (b. about 1857 entered New College Oxford 1875, married 1878 Holborn, poss registered in Liverpool 1905 as a Professor of Music (?), d.1941 north Wales). Frederick George was a house decorator in Chelsea, in 1861-2. cf: 1861 census for Chelsea. He became an oil & colorman in Mayfair. Eliza(beth) senior took over the business after his death in 1879 at 18 Shepherd's Market. She died 1884 Mayfair.

 

@1829

25 January, East Buckland: The will of Edward Brownscombe is proved in the Court of the Archdeaconry of Barnstaple.[325]

 

20 January, St. John's, Newfoundland: `Much and deservedly respected, Mr. William Branscombe, a native of this town, aged 78. Friends of the family are requested to attend his funeral, which takes place on the 25th at one o'clock.'[326] [b. circa 1751]

 

11 March, St. Ann's, Blackfriars: Maria Mary, daughter of John & Mary Branscomb, baptised.[327] [adult christening - born 25 February 1814 - marries Rusk 1841? Poss daughter of John & Mary Ann (Lambeth - m. 1803 London)? Poss siblings baptised in Southwark: Eleanor Ann (1804), Emily Sophia (1807), John Stephen (1809), Clara Elizabeth & Eliza Sarah (1812), Louisa Maria (bp. 1814), Maria Mary (b. 1814)]

 

14 April, St. John's, Newfoundland: Elizabeth, eldest daughter of William Branscombe, dies aged 23. Funeral on the 18th at 11 o'clock.[328] [b. circa 1806]

 

24 April, Topsham: Robert Branscombe, fifth child of mariner Robert & Amelia (Clare - m. 1821 Topsham), baptised. (IGI) [possibly Robert Bradford Branscombe, aged 40, son of William & Jane (Pain), described as a fisherman on his marriage, as a rope-maker in 1837 and a mariner in the 1851 census when he has moved to Littleham. He and Amelia had at least ten other children: Susanna Mary (1821), Mary Jane Harriet (1822), William Clare (1824), George Eastman (1827), Elizabeth or Amelia (1832), Harriet Garlick (1834), Susan & Sophia (1837), Thursa or Thirza (1838). Robert junior apprenticed to sea 1844]

 

13 May, Highweek: Samuel Branscombe marries Mary Eales by licence. Both of Highweek.[329]

 

14 May, Newton Abbott: Advertisement for Branscombe, milliner.[330]

 

2 June, Exmouth: Notice that the John & Jane will ply weekly to the Channel Isles from Topsham, for particulars to Captain Michael Perriam opposite the Dolphin, Exmouth.[331]

 

4 July, Grayson County, Virginia: Frances Branscom marries Alfred O'Neal.[332]

 

31 July: Johanna Branscombe born, daughter of William & ?

 

13 August, Tormoham, Torquay: Elizabeth Jane Sparkes, seventh child of Edward & Ann Branscombe [direct ancestors], born. Baptised, 6 September (3 weeks). [cf: William Sparks, an officer of the Exeter Relief Society - a neighbour, and on friendly terms with Edward and his family at the time of his drowning in 1843. Perhaps William showed the Branscombes some kindness in pursuit of his duties, at the time of their removal from Exeter in 1826? Perhaps they therefore called their next child after him?]

 

22 October, St. Marylebone parish church Charlotte Branscomb, daughter of ? Branscomb & Charlotte Singleton, baptised.[1]

 

December, Exeter: Anna Maria, illegitimate daughter of Mary Underhill of Magdalen Street, born. Baptised 24 January 1841. Married in 1866, giving her father as Thomas Underhill, deceased, clerk, but father possibly Thomas Branscombe, labourer? [334] [siblings: Harriet (bp. 1827), William Thomas (bp. 1834), John (b. 1838, d.1858)]

 

Hobart; is described as having rough streets and squalid houses. Drunkenness is said to be common; murder and robbery commonplace. There were chain gangs in the streets, two or three hundred yards long, in heavy irons. However a visitor from England, a Mrs. Bessie Fenton, recounts a visit to a cottage in Macquarie Street that is:

 

`... within a little compound of shrubs and flowers, with a small, cheerful drawing-room, being evidence of the high tone of its occupants.'

 

The London Metropolitan Police are formed.

 

Western Australia's first colonists arrive at the on board the Parmelia & Caroline. On board the Caroline, Henshaw, fisherman, who will become the second husband of Sarah Branscombe, in 1836.[335]

 

John & Henry Branscombe are assessed for tax on their stock-in-trade [tannery] at Kingsbridge at 5s [to 1832]. They have taken over the business established by their father William in 1792. It only lasted another two years. [defrauded?][336] [cf: 1831]

 

Redbourne: Approximate year of birth of second great-grandfather John Halsey, fifth child of third great-grandparents James and Elizabeth (Bingham - m. 1820 Redbourn). [m. 1850 Paddington to Martha Hiller. d. ABOUT 1872. Siblings: Elizabeth (1821?), James (1824?), George (1826?), Emmanuel (1827?), Ann (1833?), Thomas (1834?), Emma (1837?), Charles (1839?), Eliza (1843?)]

 

Exmouth: The largest part of Bicton Street was built during this year.[337]

 

Devonshire: Edwin Branscombe born. Marries Sarah Mountjoy in Gloucestershire. Children: William James (b. 1857 Fryer’s Creek, Victoria, Australia).[338] [duplicate entry lists Edwin Browncome, b. 1826 Bideford, married Sarah Martin Mountjoy in Gloucestershire, 1853. Also lists two more children: Mary Ann Brownscome (b. 1858 Forest Creek, Victoria), Edwin Brownscombe (b. 1861 Inglewood, Victoria]

 

Plymouth: A pre-1830 edition of Pigot’s directory lists the following:

 

Wm. Branscombe, tanner, Frankfort Street.

Wm. Branscombe, glue manufacturer, Frankfort Street.

 

@1830

24 January, Dunchideock: Thomas Branscombe marries Mary Jackman. Both of St. Thomas, Exeter.[339] [poss children baptised in St. Thomas: Thomas & William (1833), Mary (1835), Eleanor (1837)]

 

25 January, Grayson County, Virginia: Isaac Branscom marries Anne Buman.[340]

 

18 March Newton Bushel?: Letter from Sam Branscombe (jun?), tanner, to Sir Thomas Acland M.P., regarding a case Acland `mentioned in the House on Monday', of Sam's workers tanning two aprons for their own use, and thereby putting Sam `in jeopardy'. Sam refers to a court appearance connected with the matter, set down for Teignmouth, 29 March 1830.[341] [cf: 1825 Samuel Branscombe, tanner of Newton Abbot]

 

18 April, Sion Chapel, Union Street (Lady Huntingdon's - non-conformist), Mile End Old Town: Matilda, daughter of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb, baptised.[342] [m. 1853 Bethnal Green?]

 

Children of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb

            Rebecca Branscomb                 11 Nov 21                   St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Emma Branscomb                    21 Dec 23                    St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Henry Branscomb                     21 Aug 25                    St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Eliza Branscomb                       12 Oct 28                    Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Matilda Branscomb                  18 Apr 30                    Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Thomas Branscomb                  19 Jan 34                     Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Edwin Branscomb                    25 Jun 37                     St. Dunstan, Stepney

 

The Alfred or West of England Journal and General Advertiser
8 June 1830

 

WRESTLING

At Blue Ball

Competitors

John Bastin, Exmouth
24 years, 5 feet 8 inches, 8 score & 6 lbs

James Cann, Exeter
38 years, 5 feet 10 inches, 8 score

Richard Dennis, Sowton (formerly of Littleham)
30 years, 5 feet 10 inches, 8 score & 4 lbs

WRESTLING - ST.THOMAS - A.CANN

 

September: Approximate year and month of the birth of Elizabeth, daughter of John Branscombe and Mary (Crouch - m. ? Plymouth). Buried at Kingsbridge 4 November 1835. [Parents poss Henry Branscombe (b. 1806 Kingsbridge, 5th child of tanner William Branscombe & Charlotte (Mortimer - m. 1789 Wolborough)? Henry m. 1827 Plymouth, Mary Crouch. Poss siblings: Elizabeth (1837), Mary Crouch (1835-1853). Also cf: Martha Crouch, third wife of William Branscombe, shoemaker of Torquay, b. Penshurst, Kent]

 

3 November, Greensville County, Virginia: Edmund Branscom marries Martha R. Caudle.[343]

 

24 November, St. Mary Somerset, London: Elizabeth Branscomb of Upper Thames Street, buried, aged 54.[344] [cf: 1834 Richard Branscombe, wholesale ironmonger of 195 Upper Thames Street]

 

25 December, St. Gregory's, Dawlish: Lewis Gregory marries Mary Ann Branscombe. (IGI) [there appears to be some kind of family connection here, other than the name of the bride, but we don't yet know what that is. A Lewis Gregory of Bartholomew Street was the informant of the death of Ann Branscombe, first wife of William, shoemaker of Torquay, in 1849. Ann died in Bartholomew Street. Also cf: 1841 census Bartholomew Street, Exeter - Lewis Gregory (b. Exeter, circa 1796-1801) husband of Mary, (not b. Exeter, circa 1801-6. Mary poss bp. 1801, St. Andrew's, Holborn, daughter of William & Sarah Branscombe of Grays Inn Lane? Also cf: 1822 Bere Ferrers, John Gregory m. Elizabeth Branscumbe]

 

Approximate year of birth in Burford, Oxfordshire, of Henry Hambridge. In the 1851 census he is recorded as a patient at St. George's Hospital, Hanover Square.

 

Highweek: Elizabeth Branscombe, first child of tanner Samuel & Mary (Eales - m. 1829), born. [remained a spinster. cf: 1831 - sibling Anna]

 

`In the 1830s, amid the building that was going on over the western fringe of London, main drainage was not yet common; it was to be another 30 years before Joseph Bazalgette could build London's full sewerage system.'[345]

 

`By a great effort Manchester had built thirty-two miles of sewers by 1830, but this still left nearly half the town without. Things were much worse in Liverpool where there were only eleven miles of sewers, and these were in the wealthiest areas that needed them least.'[346]

 

William Branscombe, gentleman of St. Sidwell Street, Mrs. Branscombe of Heavitree & Elizabeth Branscombe, butcher of (85/86?) Fore Street. [directories] [347]

 

Reign of King George IV ends (since 1820). William IV succeeds to the throne (to 1837).

 

As late as 1830, when the cotton industry might truly be said to have lived in a turmoil of invention for sixty years, there were still, in England and , at least 200,000 hand-looms working in cotton.

 

George Augustus Robinson rounds up the last Tasmanians, and takes them to Flinders Island.

 

1830's: Commencement of Britain's main railway lines.

 

410-12 Macquarie Street, South Hobart built?

 

`... mounting rural discontent in the early nineteenth century produced widespread riots in southern England in 1830 - where `night after night [the] blazing sky told that Captain Swing had been at work'- many men found themselves condemned even more arbitrarily to imprisonment, transportation or death.'[1]

 

Branscombe: Trafalgar House (now Barnells) built by Captain Yule, R.N., into whose arms, it is said, Nelson fell, at the Battle of Trafalgar.

 

Kingsbridge: Approximate year of birth of William Branscombe, who marries Emma Bigwood in Bristol, 1860. Children: Henry James (1862 St. Kilda, Melbourne), Mary Elizabeth (1863 Richmond, Victoria), William Harcourt (1873 Bristol), John Ernest Mackay (1879 Barton K district). William d.1912 Eastbourne, Emma d.1927 Herne Bay, Kent, William Harcourt d.1901 Ashanti. William, aged 72, is registered in Swansea in the 1901 census, possibly with Emma, John and Mary.

 

PIGOT’S DIRECTORY OF DEVON (pre-1830?)

 

Branscombe                             tanner                           Fore Street, Kingsbridge

[poss William Branscombe (m. Charlotte Mortimer 1789 Wolborough) or Henry, their son?]

 

Branscombe, James                  miller                            Elmore Street, Tiverton

[poss James, nephew of Sir James of Holborn. James the miller dies intestate, in 1833]

 

Branscombe, John                    linen-draper                  East Street, Newton Abbot

[poss bp. 1789 Highweek, firstborn child of John & Mary (Mountstephen - m. 1787 Wolborough). John junior m. 1824 Wolborough, Sarah Alsop of Wolborough. They may have had a child called Sarah, who is born about 1827. She is recorded living with John in the household of Richard Beard, photographer husband of John's sister Elizabeth, in the 1851 census]

 

Branscombe, Samuel                fellmonger                     Newton Bushel, Newton Abbot

Branscombe, Samuel                tanner                           Newton Bushel, Newton Abbot

[poss Samuels junior & senior. Samuel junior b. circa 1802. Married 1829 Highweek, Mary Eales. Samuel senior poss bp. 1791 Highweek, second child of John & Mary (Mountstephen - m. 1787) poss siblings: John (1789), Richard (1793), Philip (1796), Elizabeth (1797). Samuel and Mary have nine children. Mary dies 1845-51, Samuel dies 1874 in Highweek]

 

Branscombe, William                glue manufacturer          Frankfort Street, Plymouth

Branscombe, William                tanner                           Frankfort Street, Plymouth

 

[poss William, b. 1790 Kingsbridge, first child of William bp. 1765 Wolborough Street Salem Chapel (independent) son of Samuel & Elizabeth (Shapley - m. 1758 Wolborough), m. 1789 Charlotte Mortimer in Wolborough? The couple, William junior may have moved to Kingsbridge in 1791, where Samuel becomes a tanner. Poss formerly an inn-keeper?]

 

PIGOT’S DIRECTORY OF DEVON 1830

 

Branscombe, Henry                  corn merchant               Fore Street, Kingsbridge

Branscombe, Henry                  tanner & fellmonger      Fore Street, Kingsbridge

Branscombe, Henry                  carrier from Dodbroke to Dartmouth every Saturday

 

Year of birth of Hiram Branscum. Married Mary A. Black. Children include: John James (aka Little Jim). Hiram d. 1895, Wayne County, Kentucky. USA.[349]

 

Tasmania: Thomas Branscombe subscribes to the New Town Church appeal. [Launceston Examiner] [350]

 

Ottery St Mary: William Branscombe, shopkeeper, Sandhill Street. [351]

 

@1831

3 January, St. Sepulchre, London (also known as Holy Sepulchre without Newgate): Emma, daughter of John (deceased) & Mary Branscomb of 8 West Street, Smithfield, baptised. Said to be thirteen years of age at baptism.[352] [cf: 1818 for poss. birth, 1846 for poss. marriage]

 

8/12? January, Dawlish: Hannah [Williams], wife of Captain Joseph Branscombe [m. 1827], dies, aged 42.  Buried at .

 

 

SACRED
to the memory of
HANNAH the wife of
JOSEPH BRANSCOMBE
who departed this life
January 8th 1831
aged 42 years

 

 

 

22 February, East Stonehouse, Plymouth: John Branscombe, labourer, marries Sarah Allen. Both of East Stonehouse.[353] [Bishop's transcript]

 

6 April, St. Sidwell's, Exeter: George Henry Dacie & Eliza (Dacie - m. 1817, Exeter), christened. (IGI) [Sixth child of William, gentleman, accountant & common carrier of St. Sidwell's. William d.1859 - George becomes a Reverend - cf: 1855. Siblings: Louisa (1819), William Dacie (1821), Selina (1823), John Austwick (1825), Frederick (1827), Eliza Austwick (1834)]

 

7 September, Tormoham or Dawlish: Adelaide Salome Branscombe, daughter of William the shoemaker & Ann, born. [m. Alfred Nye 1850]

 

30 September, Stoke Damerel: Charlotte Branscombe marries draper Edward Granville. Both of this parish.[354] [bp. 1794, Kingsbridge, fourth child of William Branscombe & Charlotte (Mortimer - m. 1789 Wolborough)? Siblings: William (1790 Wolborough), Elizabeth (1791), Ann (1792), Henry (1806 - Kingsbridge?), John (1808). There was also a  seventh child, Catherine, mentioned as a sister in the 1851 will of Ann, as yet unaccounted for]

 

October: Asiatic cholera first reaches Britain.

 

11 October, The Alfred or West of England Journal, Exmouth: `The fishing boat we mentioned in our last as being swamped while boming over the bar at Topsham belonged to Mr. Beavis of Exmouth. Four men perished, George Andrews leaving a widow and 7 children, Joseph Beavis a widow and a child, Thomas Parker a widow and child and George Perriam who was unmarried. Andrews belonged to Topsham and the other 3 to Exmouth.'[355]

 

6 November, Grayson County, Virginia: Rhody Branscom marries Nathan Thompson.[356]

 

28 December, Fremantle, Western Australia: Sarah Branscombe, spinster, & Thomas George Rees/Reece (b. 1801 - d.1834) arrive ex-London per the Egyptian.[357] [Sarah poss baptised 25 December 1805, Ottery St. Mary, daughter of Charles & Sarah Branscombe. Charles poss. bp. 1773 Ottery St. Mary, son of Peter Branscomb & Ann Davies? Charles of Ottery St. Mary m. 1799, Venn Ottery, Sarah Hellier. cf: John Hellier m. 1749. Poss other children of Charles & Sarah: Mary (1799), Ann (1802), William (1804) - all bp. Venn Ottery, Lydia (1808/1811?) - bp. Ottery St. Mary]

 

An account of the previous year's (?) voyage to the settlement from London, by the same ship and under the same captain (W. ) is published in Durack's book To Be Heirs Forever.[358]

 

`The settlers who arrived at the Swan River Colony after 1 June 1829 confronted an inhospitable environment. Those two hundred or more who landed from the pioneer ships Parmelia [June 2 1829] and Sulphur [December 25, 1830] spent the first three months in makeshift huts of limestone, canvas and thatched bushes built on the lee side of swan River, W.A.Garden Island. When land was eventually allocated, the settlers were too busy with survival to be concerned about the australiaAborigines, and there are few records of their first encounters.'[359]

 

2 December, Wayne County, Kentucky: Lucinda Branscomb marries Marcum Vaughan. [360]

 

North Molton: John Brownscombe marries Ann Gibbs. [361]

 

Paddington:Green; Green: Siddons dies.

 

The Helene of Russia visits Lower House, Branscombe. With about 100 servants, she took up residence in Sidmouth for some months.

 

New London Bridge opens to traffic. It cost £1,458,311.

 

`By 1830-31, a number of tradespeople were occupying premises in the Strand [Dawlish], including:

 

            No 16   Daniel Litton jun., Chemist & Druggist

                        (now #26-7 Brunswick Place)
[362]

 

 

Henry & John Branscombe are owners and occupiers of estates or property in Kingsbridge assessed for land tax at £1.1.8d, or £9 if rented [to 1832] [363]

 

James Pearce dies at Venbridge Farm, Kenton, aged 84. The farm is the property of Henry Anning & Frances (Pearce).[364] [cf: 1809]

 

William Bransome of Meppershall, Bedfordshire - probate record.[365]

 

Ashton [nr.Doddiscombsleigh, Exeter]: Approximate year of birth of Thomas Branscombe, recorded as a general carrier's clerk lodging in the household of coach-driver Peter Jones, in Plymouth St. Andrew, in the 1851 census. The 1881 census shows a Thomas Branscombe, aged 50, born in Ashton, living with his family in Islington. He is a clerk. His wife, Mary A., 47, a milliner, was born in High Laver, Essex. Their three children were born in Brixton and Highbury. This is possibly Mary Ann Nottage, who marries a Thomas Branscombe in Lambeth, 1863.

 

Calstock, Cornwall?: Possible date and place of marriage between Elizabeth -? of Calstock & John Branscombe, pilot and waterman of Bere Alston. They are recorded in the 1851 and 1881 census living in Prospect Place, Plymouth St. Andrew. Their son, John Oliver, is born in Calstock in 1832.

 

Highweek: Anna, second child of tanner Samuel & Mary (Eales - m. 1829 Highweek), is born.[366] [d.1836] [cf: 1829,1832 for siblings]

 

`In the sixty years before 1831, Manchester increased its size six times.'[367]

 

EXETER POCKET JOURNAL 1831


Eliz Branscombe, butcher, 85 Fore Street

[this entry repeated every year from 1830-1837 but not after]

 

The Earldom of Devon, held dormant since 1556 by seven successive descendants of Edward Courtenay, owners of Powderham Castle, is recovered by William, Viscount Courtenay of Powderham.[368] [There were another five earls between 1831 and 1892]

 

@1832

24 January, Kingsbridge: Elizabeth Branscombe, widow,  marries William Roberts, widower, by licence. Both of this parish.[369]

 

11 February, Topsham: Elizabeth?/Amelia? Branscombe, daughter of Robert & Amelia (Clare - m. 1821 Topsham) christened. (IGI) [possibly sixth child of mariner Robert Bradford Branscombe, aged 40, son of William & Jane (Pain), described as a fisherman on his marriage, as a rope-maker in 1837 and a mariner in the 1851 census when he has moved to Littleham. He and Amelia had at least ten other children: Susanna Mary (1821), Mary Jane Harriet (1822), William Clare (1824), George Eastman (1827), Robert (1829), Harriet Garlick (1834), Susan & Sophia (1837), Thursa or Thirza (1838)]

 

2 April, Van Diemen's Land: Henry Branscombe, steward,  departs on the James Pattison for Madras & Calcutta.[370]

 

19 May, Hobart: Thomas Branscomb sworn in as a juror in the case of Molloy vs Sorrell, Supreme Court of Van Diemen's Land, Justice Pedder presiding.

 

5 June, Dulverton: Frederick Branscombe born. Seaman's ticket issued in 1849.[371] [poss the subject of a newspaper appeal for next of kin, in 1858? Poss married Elizabeth ? Liverpool, 1862? Poss children: Matilda (1863-1863), Frederick John (1865), Elizabeth (1866), Ellen (1869)? Poss d.1869 W Derby? ]

 

3 July, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: Richard Dare marries Harriet Branscombe. Both of this parish.[372]

 

20 September, East Buckland: Susan Brownscombe aged 28 is buried.[373] [cf: 1821 Edward Brownscombe, Clerk's Award, East Buckland, 1825 Mary Brownscombe, 1827 Edward & William Brownscombe, 1834 Catherine Brownscombe, all buried East Buckland]

 

21 September: Sir Walter Scott dies.

 

20 October, Barnstaple: The will of Susanna Brownscombe is proved in the Court of the Archdeaconry of Barnstaple.[374]

 

23 November, Van Diemen's Land: Thomas Branscombe is the owner of a farm at O'Brian's Bridge.[375] [cf: 1826 - a Thomas is a tenant and agent at Kensington]

 

17 December, Tormoham, Torquay: Robert John, eighth and last child of third great-grandparents Edward Branscombe & Ann ( - m. 1817, Dartmouth), born. [bp. 27 Jan, Tormoham. Cf: 1901 census for St Pancras. Poss d.1911 Pancras?]

 

Approximate year of marriage of Walter Branscomb to Jane ? [Walter James, b. 1797 Holborn, son of James & Sarah (Jackson). Jane dies before 1861 census, Walter James d.1865, Newington. Children: Sarah Marianna (1833), Walter James (1836), (Samuel ABOUT 1837?), James Alexander (1838), Marianna Ursula (1839), Alexander Charles (1846). Descendant Joan Margaret Lubbock says Jane’s maiden name was Cowling]

 

There are two weekly coaches between Hobart and Launceston. The one-way fare is £5.

 

There are theatres operating in Sydney and Hobart.

 

The Reform Act. Registers of parliamentary voters first began to be systematically kept. Before this, constituancies were unequal, and electoral qualifications varied from district to district. Some areas of the country were entirely unrepresented in Parliament, whereas ancient boroughs returned two M.P. s to the House of Commons, even those that had dwindled in size and importance, the so-called Rotten Boroughs. The grouping of boroughs gave a preponderance of representatives to the south and east of the country, at the expense of the new industrial towns of the midlands and the north, and the boroughs returned approximately three times as many M.P. s as the counties. Most people recognized that reform of parliament was of paramount importance, since much-needed reforms in other administrative institutions, such as the church, the universities and the law courts, was unlikely to come about until its inception. The electoral system as it stood gave the landed aristocracy an unacceptable hold over the House of Commons, which needed a wider basis for its authority. The obvious remedy lay in an extension of the franchise and the redistribution of seats.

 

The Act created a uniform franchise in the boroughs, consisting of owners and occupiers of property worth £10 in annual value. Franchise in the counties was given to £10 copyholders and £50 leaseholders, while the long-standing rights of 40s. freeholders were upheld. This added about 217,000 voters to an electorate of 435,000 in England and Wales. Prior to the Act, Devon had returned 26 MPs - 2 county members, 2 for the city and county of Exeter, and 2 each for the boroughs of Ashburton, Barnstaple, Beer, Alston, Dartmouth, Honiton, Okehampton, Plymouth, Plympton, Tavistock, Tiverton and Totnes. After the Act, the number of MPs was cut to 22, and split the county into two divisions, North and South, each returning 2 MPs. The boroughs of Beer, Alston, Okehampton and Plympton were disenfranchised. Ashburton and Dartmouth each lost 1 MP, and 2 members were given to the new borough of Devonport ... Before 1832 there were no comprehensive lists of voters; the electorate was small in most boroughs, while in the counties, most voters could prove their qualification by producing receipts for payment of land tax ... the increased franchise made a list necessary, and the duty of compilation was given to the overseers of the poor. Annual lists of eligible voters were to be deposited with the Clerk of the Peace, who produced printed registers from them.'[376]

 

The decade of political frenzy that accompanied the Reform Acts of 1831 and 1832 fostered an increasing interest in science. Debates developed on such themes as `The decline of science in England', and whether the Royal Society had too dominant a role in leading English science. The computer pioneer Charles Babbage played an active part in leading these debates.

 

The British Association for the Advancement of Science came into existence in 1831 as a rival to the Royal Society, but it differed by being both provincial and itinerant.[377]

 

Carbonear, Newfoundland: (Captain) George Branscombe born.[378] [cf: 1867, receives captain’s ticket, Greenock. Poss d.1874?]

 

Great cholera epidemic, Exeter.

 

Dawlish: `When cholera was raging all over Devon, the Select Vestry took precautions about a Cholera Hospital and burial gound, but there does not appear to have been a single case in the parish, though many in the neigbouring parishes.'[379]

 

The Western Australia census mentions Sarah Branscombe [arrived Fremantle 1831], and describes her as a servant. Her daughter, Elizabeth, is born in September of this year. She is married in 1833.[380]

 

Kingswear: Approximate year of birth of Sarah Hannaford, recorded as an unmarried servant imprisoned in Devon County prison, Exeter, in the 1851 census.

 

Highweek: Emily Branscombe, daughter of Samuel & Mary (Eales - m. 1829 Highweek), born.[381] [m. 1854? to ? Cooke, d.1872]

 

Calstock, Cornwall: Approximate year of birth of John Oliver, son of pilot & waterman John & Sarah (- ?, m. 1831 Calstock?). John Oliver becomes a waterman/bargeman also & marries Sarah Northsworthy of Kingsbridge, in 1856, East Stonehouse. John Oliver dies 1908 Plymouth, by which time he is a pawnbroker. [cf: 1851,1881 censuses]

 

Kingsbridge: Last year in which the tannery of John & Henry Branscombe, established by their father William in 1792, is in their possession.

 

Chester: The 208 ton barque Jane Prowse is launched, owner W. Prowse. Registered at Liverpool. In 1838-40, her master is Captain William Branscombe. [William Prowse of Paignton, m. 1779 East Teignmouth Elizabeth Saunders.[382] cf: 1837 for sister ship "Margaret"]

 

Torquay: W. Branscombe ‘boot & shoemaker to Her Majesty’ 8 Braddens Row. Also, Henry Branscombe, tanner & fellmonger, Fore Street & Henry Branscombe, carrier, to Dartmouth every Saturday.  [383]

 

@1833

8 January, Bideford: William Brownscombe born, son of James and Ann of Alverdiscott. Baptised 13 February. [384]

 

22 January, Hastings: William Thomas Branscombe born. Apprenticed to the sea in 1845. Awarded his seaman's ticket in 1848.[385] [cf: 1841 census for Hastings. Poss son of Mary & (Samuel Stace - blacksmith?). Also cf: 1810 poss year of birth of sister Mary & 1817 year of birth of poss brother, mariner/miner Samuel (James) Henry Branscomb of Hastings]

 

Possible year of birth of William Branscomb, [house?] painter. Died St. Kilda, Melbourne, 1877.

 

Approximate year of birth of Henry Branscombe, former sailor with the Royal Navy and postman of Sheerness, Kent, who is jailed for twelve months, in 1880, for making death threats to a Post Office employee.

 

27 January, Tormoham, Torquay: Robert John (1 month), eighth & last child of Edward Branscombe & Ann ( - m. 1817, Dartmouth), baptised.

 

28 January: James Branscombe, miller, dies intestate[386] [i.e. leaving property but no will] in Tiverton, aged 73. [b. 1760?] The Gentleman's Magazine decribes him as the nephew of `... the late well-known Sir James Branscombe, stock-broker and lottery-office keeper [& lay sheriff of London]. The deceased had been in business for fifty years; and it is a remarkable fact that, though his mill [Grist Mill at Elmore - see below] was completely surrounded with water, no death had occurred under his roof for the last seventy years.'[387] He was the son of Barthomew Branscombe, who died 6 July, 1827 [1821?]. James left one child, Sarah, who married Robert Pring, baker of Bampton.[388] [cf: 1841]

 

13 February, Bideford: William Brownscombe baptised, son of James and Ann of Alverdiscott. Born 8 January. [389]

 

26 February, Tiverton: John Hussey marries Sarah Branscombe. Both of this parish.[390]

 

27 March: Mortgage by demise for 1000 years of Grist Mills Close of Land and Orchard in Elmore, Tiverton, by Robert Pring, baker of Bampton, and Sarah his wife [née Branscombe), upon trust to Rebecca Maunder, widow of Bampton, for sale, for securing £200 and interest.[391] [cf: 1821]

 

16 April, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Thomas & William, sons of Thomas & Mary Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Thomas senior, accountant of Oakhampton Street.[392] Poss Thomas & Mary Jackman `of St. Thomas', m. 1830 Dunchideock? Poss siblings, both bp. St. Thomas: Mary (1835), Eleanor (1837). Thomas junior poss b. Ashton, nr Exeter? If so, may be accountant’s clerk husband of Mary Ann Nottage (m. 1863 Lambeth)?]

 

24 April, Fremantle: Sarah Branscombe (b. 1797 - d.1867) marries Thomas George Rees/Reece. They both arrived on the same ship in 1831. Thomas was a boatman & fisherman at Fremantle. He was recorded as having recovered the Challenger Buoy (?) Both were unable to write their names on the register. They already had a child, Elizabeth Branscombe-Rees (b. 1832 - d.1883) Thomas dies the following year, 1834.[393]

 

27 April, St. Saviour's, Dartmouth: George Buckingham Branscombe buried, aged 19. Son of William & Elizabeth of St. John's, Newfoundland.[394] [b. Carbonear. Keith Matthews in the Earl Kennedy papers says he died 27 March, and that he was an employee of Samuel Codner and Company, of Dartmouth and St. John's. cf: 1834, 30 July - marriage of Leonora Sophia, fourth daughter of William Branscombe of St. John's]

 

7 May, Withycombe Raleigh: William Branscombe, aged 81, buried. Grandfather of William Branscombe, tinsmith of Mudgee.[395]

 

28 June, Hobart: A letter is published in the Hobart Mercury addressed to Thomas Anstey, Police Magistrate at Oatlands and requests that he convene a meeting to discuss the building of a church in Oatlands. [396]

 

5 July, Tormoham, Torquay: Joanna, sixth child of Edward Branscombe & Ann (Starling - m. 1817, Dartmouth), dies aged 5. [cholera? Approximate year in which Edward begins work for Messrs. White & Rouse, Exeter. By 1841, the family is resident at Bartholomew Street (North), in a small cottage opposite the New Cemetery. Employer possibly John H White, master plasterer b. about 1802 Kenton?]

 

11 July, Newton Bushel: Mary Hannaford Branscombe [d.1863], daughter of Samuel Branscombe [b.Newton Bushel 1805] & Mary Hannaford [b.Kingsbridge 1808], born.[397] [sister of Samuel Hannaford Branscombe (1828)]

 

9 September, St. Teath, Cornwall: Marriage between John Branscombe of Kingsbridge, bachelor, and Anne Graham of St. Teath, spinster [b.Gibraltar 1803], by licence. Witnessed by Robert R. Bake & John Oliver.[398] [John b. 1808, son of William & Charlotte (Mortimer). Children: John Graham (1834), Ellen (1837), Charlotte Mortimer (1841), Henry (1844). cf: 1874 death of John, & 1881 census for 166 Highbury New Park, Highbury. Executor of John's will was Samuel Graham Bake of 166 Highbury Park. St. Teath is about 2 miles from Lanteglos, home of the Chenneours]

 

24 September, Grayson County, Virginia: Horbert Branscom marries Nancey Dalton.[399]

 

24 October, St. Andrew's, Holborn: Sarah Marianna, daughter of solicitor Walter & Jane Branscomb [Walter son of Sir James Branscombe?] of 1 Wine Office Court, Fleet Street, baptised. Born (21 January?)[400] [Siblings: Walter James (1836), (Samuel ABOUT 1837?), James Alexander (1838), Marianna Ursula (1839), Alexander Charles (1846). In 1994, 1 Wine Office Court is still there, opposite the famous "Cheshire Cheese" pub, and just around the corner from Gough Square, home of Samuel Johnson. The inn and court are associated with many literary figures, including Dickens, who features Wine Office Court in "A Tale of Two Cities"]

 

17 November, Great Berkhampstead, Hertfordshire: Martha Brancom is baptised, daughter of David & Mary. (IGI)

 

6 December, Highweek: Samuel Quick dies, aged 69.[401] [cf: Samuel Branscombe & Ann (Quick - m. 1775) of Highweek. Also widow Mary Quick d.1834]

 

`From 1833, schools in England & Wales received Government grants. Before it became clear an organized system was necessary, educating the poor was a religious and moral duty; an outlet for charity. Middle-class children were brought up to learn that social inferiors were acceptable if they were diligent, and acquiescent. The schoolchild in the charity school could be tolerated, if it were clean, orderly and deferential. This attitude is clearly reflected in the juvenile literature of the period. All conform to the standards demanded; the teacher is a symbol of moral worth, rather than of intellectual power. This contrasts with the later fashions, where non-conformity is all, and the teacher is often an object of ridicule.'[402]

 

The East India Company's monopoly of trade with China ends.

 

`In these early decades of the nineteenth century, science gained a place in popular debate, helped especially by the Penny Magazine and the Penny Cyclopaedia. When the Cyclopaedia started, in 1833, 75000 copies of each issue were printed, priced at a penny. Geology was at the heart of many of the popular debates. The age of the earth came under scrutiny as scientists began to move away from a version of history taken literally from the bible. The fossils that collectors such as Mantell had gathered inspired further debates over whether species had evolved or were the results of separate acts of divine creation.'[403]

 

William Devonshire Saull, London wine merchant, opens a museum. Saull, a socialist, believed firmly in education for the masses, and his museum was open to all, even the working classes, on Thursdays.

 

The Royal William completes the first crossing of the Atlantic using steam power only. It takes 20 days.[404]

 

`... the cotton mills employed 60,000 men, 65,000 women, and 84,000 children and young persons.'[405]

 

William Halsey, baker & mealman, at High Street, Berkhampstead.[406] [cf: 1841 census & 1855]

 

Rugby: Approximate year of birth of William Branscombe, registered in the 1881 census for Rugby as a railway engine driver and married to Charlotte ?, born in Bilston, Staffordshire.

 

Oxford: Approximate year of birth of Emily, fifth child of Robert Branscomb (b. 1786 London), tinman, & Eliza(beth) (Talboys - m. 1819 Oxford). [Emily m. 1850 to glass-maker Joseph Tomey.[407] She died in 1872.[408] Siblings: Frederick Alphonso (1820-1902), Mary Ann (1822-1896), Richard Adolphus (1825), Elizabeth (1827-1902), Edward (1836-1893), James Adolphus (1838)]

 

Approximate year of birth of Ann Halsey, sixth child of third great-grandparents James & Elizabeth (Bingham - m. 1820 Redbourn). [Baptised 1843. Siblings: Elizabeth (1821?), James (1824?), George (1826?), Emmanuel (1827?) John (1829?), Thomas (1834?), Emma (1837?), Charles (1839?), Eliza (1843?)]

 

Approximate year of birth (St. Johns, Newfoundland?) of Captain George Branscombe, who dies at his residence, Victoria House, Waldegrave Street, of heart disease, aged 41, in 1874.[409]

 

@1834

19 January, Sion Chapel, Union Street, Lady Huntingdon's non-conformist, Mile End Old Town: Thomas, son of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb, baptised.[410]

 

Children of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb

            Rebecca Branscomb                 11 Nov 21                   St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Emma Branscomb                    21 Dec 23                    St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Henry Branscomb                     21 Aug 25                    St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Eliza Branscomb                       12 Oct 28                    Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Matilda Branscomb                  18 Apr 30                    Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Thomas Branscomb                  19 Jan 34                     Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Edwin Branscomb                    25 Jun 37                     St. Dunstan, Stepney

 

22 January, St. Andrew's, Plymouth: William Henry Branscombe marries Grace (Neyle?). Both of this parish.[411] [William possibly a carpenter. By the 1851 census, William & Grace had four children - (Elizabeth?) Eunice (b. about 1835), Frederick (b. about 1837), Frocham/Fracham (b. about 1839) & Dorcas/Dorchas (Garland? b. about 1841), all in Kingsbridge. In the 1841 census, Grace and the children are registered without William, in Dodsbrook. Grace poss d.1866, Kingsbridge district?]

 

22 January: William Branscombe of St. Sidwell's, gentleman, by order of the Mayor and Council, is made a Freeman of the City of Exeter. [Also on the same day, Burne Gurney, surgeon, is created a Freeman by order of the Mayor and Council]

 

14 February, St. Sidwell's Exeter: Eliza Austwick, seventh and last child of William Branscombe, gentleman of St. Sidwell's parish & Eliza (Dacie - m. 1817, Exeter), christened. [William described in 1825 as a `common carrier'. cf: 1851 census, where Eliza is found at Larkbeare House School, Topsham Road, Heavitree. m. 1858 Kingsbridge to ? Siblings: Louisa (1819), William Dacie (1821), Selina (1823), John Austwick (1825), Frederick (1827), Rev. George Henry Dacie (1831)]

 

27 February, Willand [Tiverton]: Mary Branscombe marries Thomas Richards.[412]

 

16 March, Highweek: Mary Quick, widow of Samuel [d.1833], dies, aged 69.[413] [cf: Samuel Branscombe & Ann (Quick - m. 1775) of Highweek]

 

24 May, Topsham: Harriet Garlick, Robert Branscombe & Amelia (Clare - m. 1821 Topsham), christened. (IGI) [seventh child of mariner Robert Bradford Branscombe, aged 40, son of William & Jane (Pain), described as a fisherman on his marriage, as a rope-maker in 1837 and a mariner in the 1851 census when he has moved to Littleham. He and Amelia had at least ten other children: Susanna Mary (1821), Mary Jane Harriet (1822), William Clare (1824), George Eastman (1827), Robert (1829), Elizabeth or Amelia (1832), Susan & Sophia (1837), Thursa or Thirza (1838). Also cf: 1819]

 

On Ascension Day, the first ceremony of `beating the bounds' of the new Parish of Hammersmith. (formerly included with Fulham)

 

`The West London Railway runs in the bed of an ancient stream (Counters Creek] which rose north of Wormwood Scrubs, and ended at Chelsea Creek, and this brook was crossed by a bridge at the place where the railway bridge (Addison Bridge) now stands on the Hammersmith Road. The stream was evidently the determining factor in the old parish boundary line between Hammermith and Kensington, but Hammersmith Borough includes the line in its course from Willesden to Uxbridge Road, going beyond it to the Harrow Road and Kensal Green Cemetery at the northern end; further south it runs out in an irregular loop to include Latimer Road Station, returning to the railway at Uxbridge Road; subsequently it dips just westward of the railway to Hammersmith Road. Northward it runs to the Uxbridge Road, follows this eastward for a few yards, and strikes again northward up Old Oak Road and Old Oak Common Road, until it reaches Wormwood Scrubs public and military ground. It then trends north-eastward, curves back to meet the Midland and south-Western line as it crosses the canal, and follows Old Oak Common Road until on a level with Willesden Junction Station, from thence eastward to the Harrow Road.'

 

`Goldhawke Road is an old Roman road, a fact which was conclusively proved by the discovery of the old Roman causeway, accidentally dug up by workmen in 1834.'[414]

 

16 July: John Graham Branscombe, first child of John Branscombe of Kingsbridge & Ann Graham of Gibraltar [m. 1833], born. Baptised 12 November 1834 in Kingsbridge. Went to sea in 1850, as a Boy, awarded seaman's ticket in the same year.[415] [siblings: Ellen (1837), Charlotte Mortimer (1841), Henry (1844)]

 

24 July, St. Gregory's, Dawlish: Captain William Branscombe (b. 1803), son of John & Agnes (Pike - m. 1781 Dawlish), marries Sophia Willis (aged 29 - d.1873), witnessed by Samuel and Ann Branscombe. [by licence?] [Sophia may be the daughter of Thomas & Anna Willis, and the brother of William. Thomas Willis was the tenant of the Branscombe estate in Dawlish Water 1793-8. By 1840, this is owned by Joseph Branscombe, Captain William's brother. Anna Willis, aged 75 and possibly widowed, is a farmer in Dawlish Water in the 1841 census. William Willis, aged 40 and possibly her son, is living on the farm with her. Sophia, by then married with her 6 year-old daughter Sarah Ann, is living in the same household, although marked as a separate family. Her husband, William, is away at sea, half-way through a trip to Sydney. William's poss siblings: John (1782-1795), Captn. Joseph (1784-1866), Anne (1787-1787), Sarah (1790-1849), Catherine (1793-1855), John (1796), Anne (1798)]

 

24 July, Dawlish: William Branscombe marries Elizabeth Preston, spinster? [416]

 

30 July, St. John's, Newfoundland: Leonora Sophia, fourth daughter of Mr. William Branscombe of this town, marries Mr. George Winter of Winter and Preston, Demerara. Married by the Rev. F.H. Carrington.[417]

 

13 August: The Poor Law Amendment Act. The system of Workhouses is introduced, in Britain. `... it came as near to the work of the devil as it is possible to imagine ... a reform conceived in the hard inhuman spirit of modern science.' [It] so lacked humanity that the poor preferred to starve in their cottages rather than enter the new workhouses, for these aptly named bastilles: `... lacerated their bruised souls in the only spot where feeling was left: the law tore asunder husband and wife, parents and children.''[418]

 

`...in effect, [it] nationalised the poor... [It was] the first major social reform to follow the great Reform Act. [It was] brought about by changing times... industrialisation, unemployment, and a rapid increase in the population - it established a pattern of social relief which lasted for more than 100 years. Had it worked the way it was planned as a self-operating test of need, providing humane care for the indigent, and deterring the idle from sponging off the rates, it might have proved a benefit to all. In the event, it punished the poor for even demanding the right to eat and, by many cruel economies, cutting the cost of relief to the bone, achieved substantial savings in the rates to the benefit only of those who grudgingly paid them.' [419]

 

`... working men did not have any political power. There was no party in Parliament to represent them and they did not have the vote. There was no legal way at all to make Parliament change an old law, or make a new one, except to send in a petition. It was not usual for Parliament to pay much attention to petitions from working men, so it is not surprising that many of them became frustrated and tried to win their way by illegal means.'[420]

 

11 September, East Buckland: Catherine Brownscombe, aged 25, is buried.[421] [cf: 1821 Edward Brownscombe, Clerk's Award, East Buckland, 1825 Mary Brownscombe, 1827 Edward & William Brownscombe, & 1832 Susan Brownscombe, all buried East Buckland]

 

25 September, Holy Trinity, Exeter: William Branscombe marries Betty Woolaway.[422]

 

26 September, Pilton: The will of Catherine Brownscombe is proved in the Court of the Archdeaconry of Barnstaple.[423]

 

29 December, Exeter: William Thomas, son of Mary Ann Underhill, spinster of St. James' Street, baptised privately. Married Harriet Westcott in Plymouth, 1859, giving father as William Underhill, accountant. William Thomas has been described as a splendid and proud old man who would never say who his father was. It was thought by his family that his reticence was due to resentment of the fact that his parents were not married.[424] [father possibly Thomas Branscombe, labourer/farmer/accountant? siblings: Harriet (bp. 1827), Anna Maria (b. 1829), John (b. 1838, d.1858)]

 

Thomas George Rees/Reece, fisherman of Fremantle, dies. [cf: 1833][425] His wife Sarah (Branscombe) re-marries in 1836.

 

Calstock, Cornwall: Approximate year of birth of Louisa, daughter of pilot & waterman John & Sarah (-?, m. 1831 Calstock?). [cf: 1851,1881 censuses]

 

Highweek: Charlotte Branscombe, daughter of Samuel [tanner, b. 1792, d.1874] & Mary (Eales - m. 1829, d.1847), & sister of Anna (1840-1913) born. [remained a spinster - d.1883]

 

Approximate year of birth of Thomas Halsey, seventh child of third great-grandparents James & Elizabeth (Bingham - m. 1820 Redbourn). [Baptised 1838. Siblings: Elizabeth (1821?), James (1824?), George (1826?), Emmanuel (1827?) John (1829?), Ann (1833?), Emma (1837?), Charles (1839?), Eliza (1843?)]

 

Hobart's population c.14000.

 

Point Puer juvenile reformatory opened.

 

`Any sensible Englishman of the upper or middle class might wish that he had been born in the Spring of 1834, and had died in the Spring of 1914, at the age of 80. It was the latest time when he would have had a real continuity of life, and have been warmed by a steady belief in progress; the latest when he would have enjoyed all but a minute fraction of his income; the latest when he would have left his capital and his possessions almost undiminished, to his heirs; the earliest at which he could have enjoyed inventions of the modern age-railways, steamships, good sanitation, anaesthetics, antiseptics, electric light and, in his old age, telephones and motor-cars.'[426]

 

`... the quantity of water daily supplied by the eight different water companies of London [is] upwards of 21,000,000 imperial gallons. By far the greatest portion of this [is] drawn from the Thames, a small quantity from the springs and ponds of Highgate and Hampstead, and the rest from the River Lea and the New River.[427]

 

Invention of the first mechanical reaper, in America.

 

LONDON POST OFFICE DIRECTORY 1834


R Brandscombe                        Wholesale Ironmonger
                                                195 Upper Thames Street

[May be Robert Bradford, son of William & Jane of Topsham, baptised 23 July 1797? - cf: 1841 Marylebone census. cf: 1830 Elizabeth Branscomb dies, Upper Thames Street. cf: 1840 premises at 27 Old Fish Street]

W Brandscomb                        Solicitor
                                                1 Wine Office Court, Fleet Street

 

Approximate year of birth of Henry Branscombe, former sailor with the Royal Navy and postman of Sheerness, Kent, who is jailed for twelve months, in 1880, for making death threats to a Post Office employee.

 

@1835

26 February: Title deed to John Branscombe, builder of Exmouth & Joseph Gay, mason of Exmouth. Lease of land and six houses in Bicton Street, Littleham, Exmouth, from Thomas Teed of Salterton, East Budleigh; his wife Hannah; also William Teed of Salterton, shoemaker (a minor) & others, for sixty years, at £2 a year. (EPNI) [cf: 1856] [cf: 1893 John Teed, boot & shoemaker & 1841 census - Thomas Gay, mason of Dawlish. Also John Gay Wilkinson, husband of Lydia Obrecht Branscombe]

 

5 April, St. John The Baptist, Shoreditch: Jane Branscumb marries Edward Williams. (IGI)

 

Monday 6 April, Home Circuit Kingston: Mr Justice Gaselee considers the case of Foote v Branscombe and another.

 

At a little after 8 o/c on the evening of February 4th last year, Foote was knocked down crossing Blackfriars Road by a gig which belonged to and was being driven by Branscombe, an Ironmonger, accompanied by Pocklington, a butcher.  Witnesses could not be sure if it was the gig that knocked him down or a cab behind.  Branscombe and Pocklington pleaded Not Guilty.  Verdict was a payment of damages of 20/-.  The defendants had been to Epsom that day to course. [428] [cf: 18 November. The 1834 Postal Directory for London lists an R Brandscombe, Wholesale Ironmonger, at 195 Upper Thames Street. May be Robert Bradford, son of William & Jane of Topsham, baptised 23 July 1797?  cf: 1841 Marylebone census. cf: 1830 Elizabeth Branscomb dies, Upper Thames Street. cf: 1840 premises at 27 Old Fish Street]

 

22 April, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Mary, daughter of Thomas & Mary Branscombe, and Joshua Branscombe, son of Joshua, are baptised. (IGI) [Thomas, accountant of Oakhampton Street.[429] Poss Thomas & Mary Jackman `of St. Thomas', m. 1830 Dunchideock? Poss siblings, all bp. St. Thomas: Thomas & William (1833), Eleanor (1837)]

 

6 June, Dawlish: Catherine Branscombe dies, aged 61.[430] [b. about 1774]

 

9 June, Dawlish: Sarah Ann, daughter of William Branscombe, seaman, and Sophia (Willis - m. 1834), baptised.[431] [Sarah Ann m. 1856 Henry Holman]

 

30 July, Wayne County, Kentucky: Sarah Branscomb marries Travis Thomas.[432]

 

August: William Henry Fox-Talbot makes the world's first photographic negative, a tiny exposure of an oriel window at Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire. [cf: Joseph Neipce 1826, Daguerre 1839]

 

23 August, St. James, Westminster: Eliza Branscombe marries Charles George. (IGI)

 

30 August, Tormoham: Emma, daughter of Isaac Starling/Sterling, labourer of Torr, and Elizabeth, born.

 

11 October, Castle Green Independent, Bristol: Mary Crouch Branscombe, daughter of Henry and Mary Crouch Branscombe, baptised. (IGI) [d.1853 Clifton district. Henry may have been born in 1806, Kingsbridge, the fifth child of tanner William Branscombe & Charlotte (Mortimer - m. 1789 Wolborough)? Henry m. 1827 Plymouth, Mary Crouch. Poss siblings: Elizabeth (1830-1835), Elizabeth (1837). Also cf: Martha Crouch, third wife of William Branscombe, shoemaker of Torquay, b. Penshurst, Kent]

 

18 October, Calstock: Ann Allen Branscombe baptised, daughter of John & Sarah of Calstock. [cf: 1836 Calstock, Ann Allen Branscombe buried, also 1837 Calstock, Richard Branscombe baptised]

 

4 November: Elizabeth, aged 5 years 2 months, daughter of Henry & Mary Branscombe of Bristol, dies. Buried at Kingsbridge.[433] [cf: 11 Oct.above. Elizabeth b. 1830 Sept?]

 

Wednesday 18 November, Bail Court: Foote v Branscombe and Pocklington.

 

Mr Shee applied to the Court to discharge a rule nisi for a new trial.  The action was tried at the Surrey March assizes when the plaintiff obtained a verdict for 20/- damages against both the defendants who, from careless driving, had run over and seriously injured the plaintiff in Blackfriars Road.  The application for a new trial alleged that the defendant Branscombe, who held the reins, was the only party against whom a verdict ought to have been returned, and that Pocklington should have been examined as a witness.  He had an Affidavit, stating that a collusive settlement had been since entered into with the plaintiff, under which he had accepted a reduced sum of 15/- and had been, by the hand of the defendants, removed to Ireland, the object being to deprive the attorney who had conducted the plaintiff’s case, of the means of obtaining his costs and Rule granted. [434] [cf: 6 April & 26 November]

 

Tuesday 26 November, Bail Court: Foote v Branscombe and Pocklington.:

 

Mr Turner appeared to show cause against a rule nisi obtained by Mr Shea ... to be continued. [435]

 

6 December, Bampton: William Branscombe junior, farmer, dies aged 46.[436] [son of William d.1828 - possibly husband of Grace & father of John Hinam Branscombe, b. 1823?]

 

29 December, Dodbrooke: William Henry Branscombe, aged five weeks, buried.[437] [poss son of William Henry & Grace (Neyle? - m. 22 January this year?]

 

`One of the first of the Bog People was Queen Gunhild, who was discovered in Haraldskjaer Fen, in 1835. Her fame spread immediately throughout the country, and she was given a coffin by King Frederick VI, and taken to the church of St. Nicolaj, in Vejle.'[438]

 

Time-capsules...vehicles for a 300-year journey...a wooden coffin-tree of Oak.

 

One log had a small hole cut in it...big enough for a small child to get in and loot it. In some cases, this tomb-robbing had been done soon after burial.  Either way, and in particular considering the superstitious nature of the people then, and even in recent times, the children thus employed must have developed a strong stomach, and an even stronger psyche. Another, which had been looted soon after burial, had only a small hole, big enough to insert a small, hooked Hazel branch, which was found nearby. It was suggested such a branch could not only have been the instrument of invasion, but may also have been the divining rod, by which the location of the grave, and its precious metal contents was determined.

 

John Batman founds Melbourne at Port Phillip.

 

The Neva wrecked, at Cape Wickham. 219 drowned, 7 starved to death, 15 survived.

 

The Rothschild family buys Gunnersbury Park as a suburban residence.

 

Aloysious Hansom introduces his two-wheeled closed carriage to the streets of London, where it remains a familiar feature until ousted by the motor-car, in about 1910.

 

A painting of the Jane Prowse off New Brighton [mouth of the Mersey] by Samuel Walters, is dated this year. It was in the collection of Sir Ernest Royden, of Hillbark, Frankby.[439]

 

Samuel Walters (1811-1882) ... `dominated the Liverpool scene, and understandably so ... As is well recorded, Samuel Walters was in the most literal sense born into his profession, being born on a sea passage from Bideford to London on 1 November, 1811.'[440]

 

Highweek: Louisa Branscombe, daughter of Samuel & Mary (Eales - m. 1829), born. [may have m. 1876 Totnes?]

 

Kingsbridge: Approximate year of birth of (Elizabeth?) Eunice, first child (? - cf: 1834 William Henry buried Dodbrooke aged 5 weeks) of carpenter William Branscombe of Kingsbridge & Grace (Neyle? of Chillington, nr. Kingsbridge - m. 1834 Plymouth?). [cf: 1837. Also June Q 1863 - poss marriage, Plymouth?]

 

Devon: Approximate year John Branscombe born. He is registered in the 1841 census, aged 6, in the household of William Bartlett, farmer of Goveton, nr.Kingsbridge.

 

St. John's, Newfoundland: William Branscombe donates £5 to the Winton Fund.[441]

 

@1836

24 March, Jackson, Fayette County, Ohio: Benjamin Franklin Branscombe born. Son of Joseph Edmond Branscome & Dianah Pierce.[442] [B.F. Branscombe founded the township of Branscomb, California. cf: letter from B.F., 1903]

 

The family soon moved to Dekalb County, Missouri, where Joseph became Sheriff. He was shot and killed 3 days before President Lincoln was assassinated. In 1857, Benjamin joined an ox-team wagon train that was headed for California. He settled in Somoma County and farmed there for about twenty years. He married one of the daughters of the captain of the wagon train, Mary Jane Taylor, and they had 10 children, 6 boys and 4 girls. They moved to Jackson Valley, Mendocino, in 1880, where he homesteaded 160 acres of land and 40 acres more under the Timber Act. He was instrumental in starting the first school in that area. He built a large home which, after his family had grown up, he turned into a hotel. A small grocery store, meat market and livery stable were added later. After more people came into the area, he was even able to establish a post office. This was named after him. After his death, in 1921, one of his sons, John, inherited the property and ran it until 1959, when he sold it to the Harewood family, who built the timber mill in Branscomb.[443]

 

24 April, Calstock: Ann Allen Branscombe, aged 7m, buried. [probably daughter of John & Sarah of Calstock. cf: 1835 Calstock, Ann Allen Branscombe baptised, also 1837 Calstock, Richard Branscombe baptised]

 

April: The James Matheson launched, Dumbarton. 408 tons, registered at Liverpool. Built of spruce with copper bottom. Owner in 1842/3: W. Prowse. Wrecked 1844/5, on a voyage from Liverpool to China. [William Prowse of Paignton, m. 1779 East Teignmouth, Elizabeth Saunders]

 

3 May, St. Mary Major, Exeter: Henry Branscombe marries Mary Ann Horn. Both of this parish.[444] [carpenter & builder, b. & bp. 1817 Withycombe Raleigh, son of John Branscombe, joiner, & Elizabeth (Seward - m. 1816 Exeter?). cf: 1851 census. Henry d.1876 Victoria, Australia. cf: 1780 Littleham, Mary Brandscombe Horn buried]

 

a.m., 21 June, St. George's, Demerara, Newfoundland: Mary Branscombe, daughter of Mr. William Branscombe of St. John's marries George Smith Crawford, M.D., son of the late Rev. Oliver Crawford of Trinity College, Dublin. Married by the Rev. James Lugur.[445]

 

9 August, Withycombe Raleigh: Henry, son of John Branscombe, joiner, & Elizabeth, baptised.[446] [b. 1 Aug cf: 1851 census. Henry becomes a builder in Withycombe Raleigh, after some years in Bath]

 

13 June, St. Andrew's, Holborn: Walter James, (second child? - cf: 1833) of solicitor Walter & Jane Branscomb of 1 Wine Office Court, Fleet Street, baptised. Born 21 January.[447] [siblings: Sarah Marianna (1833), (Samuel c1837?), James Alexander (1838), Marianna Ursula (1839), Alexander Charles (1846). In 1859, a Walter James Branscomb is the proprietor of a "fancy repository" in King Street, Hammersmith. Walter James married Maria ? in Southwark, in 1860; he died 1865, in Newington. Also cf: 1863 Henry Branscomb's death registered in Newington. Walter senior, b. 1897, may be son of James & Sarah of Holborn]

 

27 July, Reeves' Point, Kangaroo Island: Official colonisation of South Australia.

 

22 September, Dawlish: Agnes (Pike), wife of John Branscombe, dies aged 76 years.[448]

 

 

SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF
AGNESS
WIFE OF JOHN BRANSCOMBE
WHO DIED ?? SEPTEMBER 1836
AGED 76 YEARS

 

 

 

September, Perth, Western Australia: Sarah Branscombe-Rees remarries, Thomas Henshaw [cf: 1833].[449]

 

8 October: Admiral James, Lord de Saumerez, dies.

 

30 November, Clyst St. George: George Waldron Pearse, bachelor of Topsham, marries Ellen Gaynor (Finch?), spinster of Clyst St. George. Witnesses are Anna Maria Pearce & P.J. Pearce.[450]

 

6 December, Wayne County, Kentucky: Polly Branscomb marries John Bertram.[451]

 

Francis Smith and John Ericsson individually solve the problem of screw propulsion, and its superiority [over paddle wheels] was soon apparent.[452]

 

Heavitree: Approximate year of birth of Ellen ? [d.1911 Heavitree], future wife of John Branscombe.[453]

 

Robert Bowden Branscombe becomes an apprentice at sea.[454] [b. 1820, Torquay - son of William the shoemaker & Ann(e) cf: 1845]

 

The Dissenter's Marriage Act allows non-conformist churches to be licenced for marriage ceremonies.

 

Oxford: Birth of Edward Branscomb, glass manufacturer. [marries Sarah Yardley, Birmingham 1854.[455] Sixth child of Robert Branscomb (b. 1786 London), tinman, & Eliza(beth) (Talboys - m. 1819 Oxford).[456] Edward died 1893. cf: 1855 for son Frederick's birth]

 

Admiral Saumarez dies.

 

The United States takes 25% of all British exports. 80% of Lancashire's raw cotton comes from the Southern states.

 

The Breech-loading gun is invented, in Prussia.

 

London's first railway station, at London Bridge, opens.

 

Elizabeth Branscombe, daughter of William (dec'd) & Sarah. (EBMI)

 

The Tithe Commutation Act establishes a Tithe Commission, empowered to effect a commutation of tithes in kind to an annual money payment, by voluntary agreement between tithe owner and landowner wherever possible, but by compulsion if necessary ... The principles of the 1836 Act remained the basis of rent-charge conversion until the 1936 Tithe Act provided for the gradual redemption of all tithes by the end of the century.'[457] [cf: 1839 for Dawlish]

 

Newfoundland: Arthur Kennedy Branscombe, poss son of William Branscombe, planter of St. Johns & Margaret (Kennedy - m. 1828 Carboneur), dies in this year.[458]

 

@1837

14 February, Bampton: Sarah Branscombe, wife of William [d.1828] dies, aged 73.[459]

 

17 March, Kingsbridge: Ellen Branscombe, daughter of John Branscombe of Kingsbridge & Anne (Graham - m. 1833), born. Baptised at Kingsbridge on 9 April 1837.[460] [remained a spinster. cf: 1881 census for Highbury. Siblings: John Graham (1834), Charlotte Mortimer (1841), Henry (1844)]

 

31 March, Topsham: George Waldron Pearse, son of yeoman George Waldron Pearse & Eleanor Gaynor Pearse, is baptised.[461] [m. 1836 Clyst St. George, d.1838]

 

19 April, St. Thomas the Apostle, Exeter: Eleanor, daughter of Thomas & Mary Branscombe, christened. (IGI) [Thomas, accountant of Oakhampton Street.[462] Poss Thomas & Mary Jackman `of St. Thomas', m. 1830 Dunchideock? Poss siblings, all bp. St. Thomas: Thomas & William (1833), Mary (1835)]

 

26 April, Moretonhampstead: Mary Branscombe marries Walter Mortimore. Both of this parish.[463]

 

22 May, Cheltenham: Death of Sarah, wife of Robert Long esq., of the Manor House, Dawlish. Buried in a vault at Swindon with her husband, who died at Leamington on 13 December, 1842.[464]

 

25 May, Castle Green Independent, Bristol: Elizabeth, daughter of Henry and Mary Crouch Branscombe, baptised. (IGI) [Henry Branscombe m. 1827 Plymouth, Mary Crouch. Henry may have been born in 1806, Kingsbridge, the fifth child of tanner William Branscombe & Charlotte (Mortimer - m. 1789 Wolborough)? Poss siblings: Elizabeth (1830-1835), Mary Crouch (1835-1853). Also cf: Martha Crouch, third wife of William Branscombe, shoemaker of Torquay]

 

15 June, Calstock: Richard Branscombe baptised, son of John, a labourer, and Sarah. [poss sibling Ann Allen (1835-36)]

 

25 June, St. Dunstan's, Stepney: Edwin, son of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb, baptised.[465] [possibly d. December quarter, Whitechapel district?]

 

Children of Thomas & Mary Elizabeth Branscomb

            Rebecca Branscomb                 11 Nov 21                   St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Emma Branscomb                    21 Dec 23                    St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Henry Branscomb                     21 Aug 25                    St. Mary, Whitechapel
            Eliza Branscomb                       12 Oct 28                    Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Matilda Branscomb                  18 Apr 30                    Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Thomas Branscomb                  19 Jan 34                     Sion Chapel, Mile End
            Edwin Branscomb                    25 Jun 37                     St. Dunstan, Stepney

 

1 July: Civil registration of births, deaths and marriages commences in England & Wales.

 

`... following a Royal Commission, 7000 non-parochial registers from all over the country were sent to Somerset House. These were subsequently transferred to the Public Records Office... '[466]

 

30 July, Holwell, Bedfordshire (later Herts): James, son of James Branscombe, labourer of (Fakeswell?) and Mary, baptised.[467] [Possibly son of John & Mary Bransome, bp. Sharnbrook 1811, or son of Samuel & Sarah Bransome, bp. Meppershall 1803?]

 

16 August, Topsham: Susan & Sophia Branscomb